Anker’s Latest USB-C Docking Station Brings Triple-Display Support to M1 Macs

While Apple’s early M1-based Macs can only officially support a single external display, there are ways around the limitation. Anker is launching a new 10-in-1 USB-C docking station today which delivers just that.



The Anker 563 USB-C dock includes two HDMI ports and a DisplayPort port, and it leverages Multi-Stream Transport to carry multiple video signals over a single connection. Given that this hub operates over a single USB-C cable, there are bandwidth limitations that limit the quality of displays you can attach.



If you want to add a single 4K display, you can do that from one of the HDMI ports, but it will only run at 30Hz. A second HDMI display and/or a DisplayPort display will be then limited to 2K resolution each at either 50Hz or 60Hz depending on configuration, so while this dock may be a solid solution for productivity setups where you don’t necessarily need high resolutions and refresh rates, users should be aware of the limitations.

Beyond the display support, the Anker 563 dock includes a wealth of other ports, including a USB-C Power Delivery port that provides up to 100 watts to the host computer, and a pair of 5 Gbps downstream USB ports: one USB-C at up to 30 watts and one USB-A at up to 7.5 watts. Two additional USB-A 2.0 ports are good for peripherals like mice and keyboards, while a Gigabit Ethernet port and an AUX in/out port round out the setup.



The Anker 563 measures in at a little under 7 inches by a little over 3 inches and just about an inch thick, although it’s powered by a 180-watt external brick. It’s priced at $249.99 and is available now from Anker and Amazon.

In other Anker news, several of the company’s recently announced products are now available to ship, including the massive 757 Portable Power Station ($1399 at Anker and Amazon) and the Nebula Cosmos Laser 4K Projector ($2199 at Nebula and Amazon).



The highly anticipated Anker 736 100-watt GaN charger that immediately sold out when it launched in black last month is also now available in white for $79.99 at Amazon. And finally, the AnkerMake M5 3D printer is in its final days on Kickstarter, where it has seen over 11,000 backers and is looking to hit its final stretch goal at $9 million in pledges.

MacRumors is an affiliate partner with Anker and Amazon. When you click a link and make a purchase, we may receive a small payment, which helps us keep the site running.

Tag: Anker

This article, “Anker’s Latest USB-C Docking Station Brings Triple-Display Support to M1 Macs” first appeared on MacRumors.com

Discuss this article in our forums

While Apple's early M1-based Macs can only officially support a single external display, there are ways around the limitation. Anker is launching a new 10-in-1 USB-C docking station today which delivers just that.


The Anker 563 USB-C dock includes two HDMI ports and a DisplayPort port, and it leverages Multi-Stream Transport to carry multiple video signals over a single connection. Given that this hub operates over a single USB-C cable, there are bandwidth limitations that limit the quality of displays you can attach.


If you want to add a single 4K display, you can do that from one of the HDMI ports, but it will only run at 30Hz. A second HDMI display and/or a DisplayPort display will be then limited to 2K resolution each at either 50Hz or 60Hz depending on configuration, so while this dock may be a solid solution for productivity setups where you don't necessarily need high resolutions and refresh rates, users should be aware of the limitations.


Beyond the display support, the Anker 563 dock includes a wealth of other ports, including a USB-C Power Delivery port that provides up to 100 watts to the host computer, and a pair of 5 Gbps downstream USB ports: one USB-C at up to 30 watts and one USB-A at up to 7.5 watts. Two additional USB-A 2.0 ports are good for peripherals like mice and keyboards, while a Gigabit Ethernet port and an AUX in/out port round out the setup.


The Anker 563 measures in at a little under 7 inches by a little over 3 inches and just about an inch thick, although it's powered by a 180-watt external brick. It's priced at $249.99 and is available now from Anker and Amazon.

In other Anker news, several of the company's recently announced products are now available to ship, including the massive 757 Portable Power Station ($1399 at Anker and Amazon) and the Nebula Cosmos Laser 4K Projector ($2199 at Nebula and Amazon).


The highly anticipated Anker 736 100-watt GaN charger that immediately sold out when it launched in black last month is also now available in white for $79.99 at Amazon. And finally, the AnkerMake M5 3D printer is in its final days on Kickstarter, where it has seen over 11,000 backers and is looking to hit its final stretch goal at $9 million in pledges.

MacRumors is an affiliate partner with Anker and Amazon. When you click a link and make a purchase, we may receive a small payment, which helps us keep the site running.
Tag: Anker

This article, "Anker's Latest USB-C Docking Station Brings Triple-Display Support to M1 Macs" first appeared on MacRumors.com

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Apple’s Merger of ‘iCloud Documents and Data’ Into iCloud Drive Now Complete

Last May, Apple Apple announced that it would be merging its iCloud Documents and Data service into iCloud Drive in May of 2022, and that transition has now been completed.



As noted in a support document updated today, users who previously relied on ‌iCloud‌ Documents and Data for syncing files across devices will need to turn ‌iCloud Drive‌ on in order to see their files.

iCloud Documents and Data, our legacy document syncing service, has been discontinued and replaced by iCloud Drive. If you used iCloud Documents and Data, your account has been migrated to iCloud Drive.

If you used the iCloud Documents and Data service, you need to turn on iCloud Drive to see your files. When you switch to iCloud Drive, the amount of storage space your saved files use in iCloud doesn’t change.

Apple’s support document provides instructions and minimum system requirements for ‌iCloud Drive‌ on iOS devices, Macs, and on the web at iCloud.com.

The vast majority of ‌iCloud‌ users already have ‌iCloud Drive‌ enabled, so they won’t see any changes. But for users who had ‌iCloud‌ accounts prior to the introduction of ‌iCloud Drive‌ in 2014 and never enabled it, perhaps to maintain compatibility with pre-iOS 8 and pre-OS X Yosemite devices that couldn’t support ‌iCloud Drive‌, they will now need to turn it on in order to regain access to their files.

The older ‌iCloud‌ Documents and Data service kept cloud-synced data stored in folders specific to a given app, only allowing access to the data from that app. With ‌iCloud Drive‌ being a more full-featured syncing service, all of those files can now be accessed from a single location: the Files app on iOS and iPadOS, the ‌iCloud Drive‌ section of Finder on macOS, or the ‌iCloud Drive‌ section of iCloud.com.

This article, “Apple’s Merger of ‘iCloud Documents and Data’ Into iCloud Drive Now Complete” first appeared on MacRumors.com

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Last May, Apple Apple announced that it would be merging its iCloud Documents and Data service into iCloud Drive in May of 2022, and that transition has now been completed.


As noted in a support document updated today, users who previously relied on ‌iCloud‌ Documents and Data for syncing files across devices will need to turn ‌iCloud Drive‌ on in order to see their files.
iCloud Documents and Data, our legacy document syncing service, has been discontinued and replaced by iCloud Drive. If you used iCloud Documents and Data, your account has been migrated to iCloud Drive.

If you used the iCloud Documents and Data service, you need to turn on iCloud Drive to see your files. When you switch to iCloud Drive, the amount of storage space your saved files use in iCloud doesn't change.
Apple's support document provides instructions and minimum system requirements for ‌iCloud Drive‌ on iOS devices, Macs, and on the web at iCloud.com.

The vast majority of ‌iCloud‌ users already have ‌iCloud Drive‌ enabled, so they won't see any changes. But for users who had ‌iCloud‌ accounts prior to the introduction of ‌iCloud Drive‌ in 2014 and never enabled it, perhaps to maintain compatibility with pre-iOS 8 and pre-OS X Yosemite devices that couldn't support ‌iCloud Drive‌, they will now need to turn it on in order to regain access to their files.

The older ‌iCloud‌ Documents and Data service kept cloud-synced data stored in folders specific to a given app, only allowing access to the data from that app. With ‌iCloud Drive‌ being a more full-featured syncing service, all of those files can now be accessed from a single location: the Files app on iOS and iPadOS, the ‌iCloud Drive‌ section of Finder on macOS, or the ‌iCloud Drive‌ section of iCloud.com.
This article, "Apple's Merger of 'iCloud Documents and Data' Into iCloud Drive Now Complete" first appeared on MacRumors.com

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EU Officially Objects to Apple Limiting Third-Party Access to Apple Pay NFC Capabilities

In line with a report late last week, the European Commission today officially announced that it has issued a Statement of Objections to Apple over its restrictions that prevent third-party services from accessing the NFC capabilities of the iPhone, thereby restricting competition in mobile wallets on iOS.



The statement is a preliminary view that will need to be confirmed with further investigation before any consequences can be administered, but lays out the direction the investigation is headed.

The European Commission has informed Apple of its preliminary view that it abused its dominant position in markets for mobile wallets on iOS devices. By limiting access to a standard technology used for contactless payments with mobile devices in stores (‘Near-Field Communication (NFC)’ or ‘tap and go’), Apple restricts competition in the mobile wallets market on iOS.

European Commission Executive Vice-President Margrethe Vestager argues that access to NFC is a requirement for viable mobile wallet services at brick-and-mortar locations.

Our concerns relate to Apple’s decision to block access to the NFC technology for payment purposes and use it solely for its own mobile wallet, Apple Pay. As a result, users of Apple devices can only pay with the ‘tap and go’ function using Apple Pay and not with other wallets. This is because competing wallet developpers need access to the NFC on Apple devices to reach Apple users.

Developing a mobile payment application is costly. Investment may only be worth it if developers can reach both Apple and Android customers. Evidence on our file indicates that some developers did not go ahead with their plans as they were not able to to reach iPhone users. This behaviour stifled innovation and prevented competition in the mobile wallet market. As a result, European consumers have little choice of mobile payment solutions when paying in shops.

Vestager mentions that Apple has cited security as its rationale for not allowing third-party access to NFC, but that regulators’ investigation have not found any evidence of that risk.

This article, “EU Officially Objects to Apple Limiting Third-Party Access to Apple Pay NFC Capabilities” first appeared on MacRumors.com

Discuss this article in our forums

In line with a report late last week, the European Commission today officially announced that it has issued a Statement of Objections to Apple over its restrictions that prevent third-party services from accessing the NFC capabilities of the iPhone, thereby restricting competition in mobile wallets on iOS.


The statement is a preliminary view that will need to be confirmed with further investigation before any consequences can be administered, but lays out the direction the investigation is headed.
The European Commission has informed Apple of its preliminary view that it abused its dominant position in markets for mobile wallets on iOS devices. By limiting access to a standard technology used for contactless payments with mobile devices in stores (‘Near-Field Communication (NFC)' or ‘tap and go'), Apple restricts competition in the mobile wallets market on iOS.
European Commission Executive Vice-President Margrethe Vestager argues that access to NFC is a requirement for viable mobile wallet services at brick-and-mortar locations.
Our concerns relate to Apple's decision to block access to the NFC technology for payment purposes and use it solely for its own mobile wallet, Apple Pay. As a result, users of Apple devices can only pay with the ‘tap and go' function using Apple Pay and not with other wallets. This is because competing wallet developpers need access to the NFC on Apple devices to reach Apple users.

Developing a mobile payment application is costly. Investment may only be worth it if developers can reach both Apple and Android customers. Evidence on our file indicates that some developers did not go ahead with their plans as they were not able to to reach iPhone users. This behaviour stifled innovation and prevented competition in the mobile wallet market. As a result, European consumers have little choice of mobile payment solutions when paying in shops.
Vestager mentions that Apple has cited security as its rationale for not allowing third-party access to NFC, but that regulators' investigation have not found any evidence of that risk.
This article, "EU Officially Objects to Apple Limiting Third-Party Access to Apple Pay NFC Capabilities" first appeared on MacRumors.com

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‘After Steve’ Examines the Tensions That Led to Jony Ive’s Departure From Apple

Tripp Mickle, a technology reporter who recently moved from The Wall Street Journal to The New York Times, is releasing a new book on Apple this week, entitled “After Steve: How Apple Became a Trillion-Dollar Company and Lost Its Soul,” and an adapted excerpt of the book was shared today that provides a look at the tensions between Tim Cook and Jony Ive that ultimately led to Ive’s departure.



The main anecdotes in the piece focus on the Apple Watch, which Ive wanted to be a fashionable accessory launched with all of the glitz of a runway show complete with a $25 million white tent. Apple’s marketing team questioned the expense and the emphasis on fashion, preferring a more traditional introduction focused on the Apple Watch’s capabilities.

While Cook ultimately sided with Ive on the fashion-oriented introduction, sources interviewed for the book suggest it was the beginning of the end for Ive’s time at Apple.

To many present, Mr. Cook’s approval seemed like a win for Mr. Ive. But the designer would later recast it as a Pyrrhic victory. He would tell colleagues that the debate over the event and the larger struggle over the watch’s marketing were among the first moments that he felt unsupported at Apple.

As the Apple Watch was pivoted to become a fitness-oriented device with broad retail distribution, Ive reportedly began to chafe at the “rise of operational leaders” within the company and an increasing emphasis on services rather than hardware, and ultimately he transitioned out of Apple to found his own design firm, Lovefrom.

The piece goes into more detail on Ive’s early days at Apple, his relationship with Steve Jobs, and additional anecdotes on Ive’s evolution following Jobs’ death.

Without Mr. Jobs, he had assumed much of the responsibility for the product’s design and its marketing. People close to Mr. Ive said he had found it draining to fight with his colleagues over promotion and had become overwhelmed by managing a staff that stretched into the hundreds, multiples of the 20-person design team he ran for years.

Cook and Ive ultimately agreed on a new Chief Design Officer role for Ive that would see him turn over daily management of the design group and shift to a part-time role laser-focused on product development.

Ive’s participation and presence waned with his new role, with Ive reportedly often going weeks without weighing in on work going on in the team. The report includes an anecdote from the iPhone X development process when Ive called an important product review meeting that he ended up being nearly three hours late for and ultimately concluded without making any final decisions.

In Ive’s absence, Apple continued to pivot more toward services while Cook’s eye for operational efficiency evolved the company even further. With Apple Park essentially finished in mid-2019, Ive decided it was time to move on.

Few knew the full extent of Mr. Ive’s battles. Few were aware of his clash with Apple’s finance team. Few understood how draining he found it to fight over marketing the watch, a product that had increased sales over time and become core to the company’s $38 billion wearables business. Yet many could recognize the tediousness of annually updating the company’s iPhones, iPads and Macs.

A review of After Steve by The New York Times praises it for Mickle’s thorough efforts to interview over 200 former and current employees and advisors. It takes issue, however, with Mickle’s epilogue that places blame on Cook for being “aloof and unknowable, a bad partner for Ive” and largely responsible for Apple’s failure to launch another product on the scale of the ‌iPhone‌. The review argues that the ‌iPhone‌ was a singular opportunity as evidenced by the fact that the Jobs–Ive partnership never yielded anything else on that scale, either before or after.

“After Steve” debuts this Tuesday, May 3 in the U.S. and is available from Amazon and other retailers.
This article, “‘After Steve’ Examines the Tensions That Led to Jony Ive’s Departure From Apple” first appeared on MacRumors.com

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Tripp Mickle, a technology reporter who recently moved from The Wall Street Journal to The New York Times, is releasing a new book on Apple this week, entitled "After Steve: How Apple Became a Trillion-Dollar Company and Lost Its Soul," and an adapted excerpt of the book was shared today that provides a look at the tensions between Tim Cook and Jony Ive that ultimately led to Ive's departure.


The main anecdotes in the piece focus on the Apple Watch, which Ive wanted to be a fashionable accessory launched with all of the glitz of a runway show complete with a $25 million white tent. Apple's marketing team questioned the expense and the emphasis on fashion, preferring a more traditional introduction focused on the Apple Watch's capabilities.

While Cook ultimately sided with Ive on the fashion-oriented introduction, sources interviewed for the book suggest it was the beginning of the end for Ive's time at Apple.
To many present, Mr. Cook’s approval seemed like a win for Mr. Ive. But the designer would later recast it as a Pyrrhic victory. He would tell colleagues that the debate over the event and the larger struggle over the watch’s marketing were among the first moments that he felt unsupported at Apple.
As the Apple Watch was pivoted to become a fitness-oriented device with broad retail distribution, Ive reportedly began to chafe at the "rise of operational leaders" within the company and an increasing emphasis on services rather than hardware, and ultimately he transitioned out of Apple to found his own design firm, Lovefrom.

The piece goes into more detail on Ive's early days at Apple, his relationship with Steve Jobs, and additional anecdotes on Ive's evolution following Jobs' death.
Without Mr. Jobs, he had assumed much of the responsibility for the product’s design and its marketing. People close to Mr. Ive said he had found it draining to fight with his colleagues over promotion and had become overwhelmed by managing a staff that stretched into the hundreds, multiples of the 20-person design team he ran for years.
Cook and Ive ultimately agreed on a new Chief Design Officer role for Ive that would see him turn over daily management of the design group and shift to a part-time role laser-focused on product development.

Ive's participation and presence waned with his new role, with Ive reportedly often going weeks without weighing in on work going on in the team. The report includes an anecdote from the iPhone X development process when Ive called an important product review meeting that he ended up being nearly three hours late for and ultimately concluded without making any final decisions.

In Ive's absence, Apple continued to pivot more toward services while Cook's eye for operational efficiency evolved the company even further. With Apple Park essentially finished in mid-2019, Ive decided it was time to move on.
Few knew the full extent of Mr. Ive’s battles. Few were aware of his clash with Apple’s finance team. Few understood how draining he found it to fight over marketing the watch, a product that had increased sales over time and become core to the company’s $38 billion wearables business. Yet many could recognize the tediousness of annually updating the company’s iPhones, iPads and Macs.
A review of After Steve by The New York Times praises it for Mickle's thorough efforts to interview over 200 former and current employees and advisors. It takes issue, however, with Mickle's epilogue that places blame on Cook for being "aloof and unknowable, a bad partner for Ive" and largely responsible for Apple's failure to launch another product on the scale of the ‌iPhone‌. The review argues that the ‌iPhone‌ was a singular opportunity as evidenced by the fact that the Jobs–Ive partnership never yielded anything else on that scale, either before or after.

"After Steve" debuts this Tuesday, May 3 in the U.S. and is available from Amazon and other retailers.
This article, "'After Steve' Examines the Tensions That Led to Jony Ive's Departure From Apple" first appeared on MacRumors.com

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Deals: iPad Mini 6 Drops to All-Time Low Price of $399.99 ($99 Off)

Amazon today has the Space Gray version of the latest 64GB Wi-Fi iPad mini available for a record-low price of $399.99, a savings of $99 off the regular price of $499.

Note: MacRumors is an affiliate partner with some of these vendors. When you click a link and make a purchase, we may receive a small payment, which helps us keep the site running.

This is by far the lowest price we’ve ever tracked on the iPad mini 6, which debuted last September, but unfortunately, it is only available in the Space Gray color option. Pink, Purple, and Starlight models are priced at $459, which is still a solid discount but nowhere near the Space Gray pricing.

256GB Wi-Fi models are priced at $599, a $50 savings compared to normal retail price. This is a solid discount that we’ve been tracking at Amazon for a while now.

For even more iPad deals, head to our full Best Deals guide for iPad. In that guide, we track the best discounts online for iPad, iPad mini, iPad Air, and iPad Pro.

Related Roundup: Apple Deals

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Amazon today has the Space Gray version of the latest 64GB Wi-Fi iPad mini available for a record-low price of $399.99, a savings of $99 off the regular price of $499.

Note: MacRumors is an affiliate partner with some of these vendors. When you click a link and make a purchase, we may receive a small payment, which helps us keep the site running.

This is by far the lowest price we've ever tracked on the iPad mini 6, which debuted last September, but unfortunately, it is only available in the Space Gray color option. Pink, Purple, and Starlight models are priced at $459, which is still a solid discount but nowhere near the Space Gray pricing.



256GB Wi-Fi models are priced at $599, a $50 savings compared to normal retail price. This is a solid discount that we've been tracking at Amazon for a while now.

For even more iPad deals, head to our full Best Deals guide for iPad. In that guide, we track the best discounts online for iPad, iPad mini, iPad Air, and iPad Pro.
Related Roundup: Apple Deals

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Apple Teases Star Wars-Themed ‘Behind the Mac’ Film Featuring Skywalker Sound

Apple today released a brief teaser trailer for an upcoming “Behind the Mac” film featuring Skywalker Sound, the sound effects division of Lucasfilm known for the Star Wars franchise and many other high-profile movies.

The full film will be released on Apple’s YouTube channel on May 4, Star Wars Day, and will examine how artists at Skywalker Sound use Macs and other tools to generate the sounds featured in the iconic films.
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Apple today released a brief teaser trailer for an upcoming "Behind the Mac" film featuring Skywalker Sound, the sound effects division of Lucasfilm known for the Star Wars franchise and many other high-profile movies.


The full film will be released on Apple's YouTube channel on May 4, Star Wars Day, and will examine how artists at Skywalker Sound use Macs and other tools to generate the sounds featured in the iconic films.
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Apple Gives Developers More Time to Update ‘Outdated’ Apps Before Removal

Late last week, controversy erupted after Apple began notifying some developers that their apps that had not been updated in some time would be removed from the App Store as part of an “‌App Store‌ Improvements” project to clean up “outdated” apps.



Many of the affected developers objected to Apple’s policy, noting that their apps continued to function just fine despite a lack of updates, highlighting the amount of work that might be needed to submit even a minor update, and pointing out that many apps can exist as finished works without a need for continual updates.

Apple has now shared a new developer update clarifying its ‌App Store‌ Improvements policies and extending the amount of time it is giving developers to update their affected apps from 30 days to 90 days.

Apple says that apps that have not been updated within the past three years and which do not meet a minimum threshold for downloads (“not been downloaded at all or extremely few times during a rolling 12 month period”) are subject to the policy, with developers receiving notices via email.

As part of the App Store Improvements process, developers of apps that have not been updated within the last three years and fail to meet a minimal download threshold — meaning the app has not been downloaded at all or extremely few times during a rolling 12 month period — receive an email notifying them that their app has been identified for possible removal from the App Store.

Developers can either appeal the pending removal or submit an update within 90 days in order to keep their apps live on the ‌App Store‌. Apps that are removed will continue to function normally for users who previously downloaded them.

This article, “Apple Gives Developers More Time to Update ‘Outdated’ Apps Before Removal” first appeared on MacRumors.com

Discuss this article in our forums

Late last week, controversy erupted after Apple began notifying some developers that their apps that had not been updated in some time would be removed from the App Store as part of an "‌App Store‌ Improvements" project to clean up "outdated" apps.


Many of the affected developers objected to Apple's policy, noting that their apps continued to function just fine despite a lack of updates, highlighting the amount of work that might be needed to submit even a minor update, and pointing out that many apps can exist as finished works without a need for continual updates.

Apple has now shared a new developer update clarifying its ‌App Store‌ Improvements policies and extending the amount of time it is giving developers to update their affected apps from 30 days to 90 days.

Apple says that apps that have not been updated within the past three years and which do not meet a minimum threshold for downloads ("not been downloaded at all or extremely few times during a rolling 12 month period") are subject to the policy, with developers receiving notices via email.
As part of the App Store Improvements process, developers of apps that have not been updated within the last three years and fail to meet a minimal download threshold — meaning the app has not been downloaded at all or extremely few times during a rolling 12 month period — receive an email notifying them that their app has been identified for possible removal from the App Store.
Developers can either appeal the pending removal or submit an update within 90 days in order to keep their apps live on the ‌App Store‌. Apps that are removed will continue to function normally for users who previously downloaded them.
This article, "Apple Gives Developers More Time to Update 'Outdated' Apps Before Removal" first appeared on MacRumors.com

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Latest AirTags Firmware Update Tunes the Unwanted Tracking Sound for Easier Detection

Earlier this week, Apple began rolling out a firmware update for AirTags, and while it wasn’t clear at the time what changes were included in the update, Apple has now revealed in a new support document that it tweaks the sound made by unknown ‌AirTags‌ found to be traveling with you.


AirTag Firmware Update 1.0.301

Tuning the unwanted tracking sound to more easily locate an unknown AirTag.

Apple has made several changes to the way ‌AirTags‌ function since their release in order to address concerns about the trackers being used for stalking purposes. Apple in February announced a suite of changes it would be making with regard to stalking concerns, with some of the changes rolling out in March with iOS 15.4 and others coming later.

One of those changes coming later involved using more of the loudest tones in the tone sequence played by an unknown AirTag to help locate it more easily, and that appears to be what this week’s firmware update includes.

Tuning AirTag’s sound: Currently, iOS users receiving an unwanted tracking alert can play a sound to help them find the unknown AirTag. We will be adjusting the tone sequence to use more of the loudest tones to make an unknown AirTag more easily findable.

While not mentioned in the release notes, Apple is rolling this firmware out on a staggered basis, and there is no way to force your ‌AirTags‌ to update. The update was capped at being delivered to 1% of AirTag users as of Tuesday when it started rolling out, which will rise to 10% on May 3 and 25% on May 9, and it will go fully live to everyone on May 13.

Tag: AirTags
Related Forum: AirTags

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Discuss this article in our forums

Earlier this week, Apple began rolling out a firmware update for AirTags, and while it wasn't clear at the time what changes were included in the update, Apple has now revealed in a new support document that it tweaks the sound made by unknown ‌AirTags‌ found to be traveling with you.


AirTag Firmware Update 1.0.301

Tuning the unwanted tracking sound to more easily locate an unknown AirTag.
Apple has made several changes to the way ‌AirTags‌ function since their release in order to address concerns about the trackers being used for stalking purposes. Apple in February announced a suite of changes it would be making with regard to stalking concerns, with some of the changes rolling out in March with iOS 15.4 and others coming later.

One of those changes coming later involved using more of the loudest tones in the tone sequence played by an unknown AirTag to help locate it more easily, and that appears to be what this week's firmware update includes.
Tuning AirTag’s sound: Currently, iOS users receiving an unwanted tracking alert can play a sound to help them find the unknown AirTag. We will be adjusting the tone sequence to use more of the loudest tones to make an unknown AirTag more easily findable.
While not mentioned in the release notes, Apple is rolling this firmware out on a staggered basis, and there is no way to force your ‌AirTags‌ to update. The update was capped at being delivered to 1% of AirTag users as of Tuesday when it started rolling out, which will rise to 10% on May 3 and 25% on May 9, and it will go fully live to everyone on May 13.
Tag: AirTags
Related Forum: AirTags

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Review: Transcend’s 1TB JetDrive Lite 330 Adds Convenient Removable Storage to Your MacBook Pro

Last week, Transcend launched a 1TB version of its JetDrive Lite 330 expansion card for the 14-inch and 16-inch MacBook Pro, giving users a convenient way to add significant amounts of storage to their machines without any extra bulk. I’ve had a chance to spend some time with the new card, and while there are limitations for some of the things you might want to do with it, the JetDrive Lite 330 can be a very handy addition to your setup.



While the JetDrive Lite 330 is at its heart simply an SD card, the novel aspect of it is that it’s designed to specifically fit flush with the MacBook Pro’s edge, allowing you to essentially leave the card inserted at all times without having to worry about the card or the slot being damaged from pressure being put on a normal-sized SD card that sticks out a bit.

The JetDrive Lite 330 has a thin plastic face that rests up against the edge of the MacBook Pro, and it provides just enough of a surface to get a fingernail behind it to remove the card. It’s a simple but great design that all but guarantees the card will stay in place throughout day-to-day usage, packing your machine in and out of a bag, and more.



Transcend says the JetDrive Lite 330 card offers read speeds of up to 95 MB/s and write speeds of up to 75 MB/s per second, and I came close to that in my testing, with Blackmagic Speed Test registering roughly 90 MB/s and 75 MB/s respectively. That’s of course well over an order of magnitude slower than the internal SSD on a MacBook Pro or even a Thunderbolt or USB 3.1+ external drive, but for certain tasks, it’s definitely sufficient.



Given the transfer speeds, you definitely can’t use the JetDrive Lite 330 as a boot drive or anything where you’re rapidly reading and writing data. It’s simply not designed for those tasks, but it’s ideal as some extra onboard storage for documents, media, and other types of data.

One popular use case for the JetDrive Lite is as an onboard Time Machine backup drive, and the new 1 TB capacity option makes this a more reasonable solution than ever. My 16-inch MacBook Pro has a 1 TB SSD, but only about 230 GB is currently used. It’s frequently recommended that your Time Machine drive be at least two or three times as large as the drive you’re backing up, in order to have enough room to save a sufficient amount of history, so this new 1 TB JetDrive Pro 330 is perfect for me as a test case.

It should be obvious, but it’s important to note that onboard Time Machine storage isn’t an ideal solution, as if your Mac is lost or stolen, so is your backup. I back up to an Apple Time Capsule at home (offsite backups would be even safer to protect against larger losses such as a fire or home burglary), but I’m currently doing a lot of international travel and the JetDrive Lite is a great way to tide me over with some sort of backup without needing an online service or potentially cumbersome external drive solutions.

Setting the JetDrive Lite up as a Time Machine drive was incredibly simple, with the card being recognized as a standard drive in Finder immediately after insertion, and then showing up in Time Machine settings as an available backup destination. Once I selected it and initiated Time Machine, it took a little over 80 minutes to complete the initial backup. Subsequent backups have taken no more than a minute or two as Time Machine looks for changes and pushes 500 MB or so onto the card.

Overall, backups are actually much faster and smoother than my usual Time Machine backups over Wi-Fi to the spinning hard drive of my Time Capsule at home. Browsing through Time Machine backups is also smoother.

Banana for scale

Once I’m done with my international travels and back to regularly backing up at home, I’ll be able to make more use of the JetDrive Lite 330 for general storage, perhaps bringing some music and photos over that currently live on external drives. Having all of that accessible right from my Mac without having to worry about carrying external drives is nice.

Apple charges $400 to double the storage on a MacBook Pro from 1 TB to 2 TB, and of course a single speedy 2 TB drive has certain benefits over this JetDrive Lite solution, but the reverse is also true. The JetDrive Lite offers additional flexibility as it can be easily added after the fact and can be removed as needed for safe storage or transfer to another machine.

The 1 TB JetDrive Lite 330 is available now for $249.99 from Amazon, and for those who don’t need as much storage, there are cheaper 512 GB, 256 GB, and 128 GB options also available.

In addition to the latest 14-inch and 16-inch MacBook Pro models from 2021, the JetDrive Lite 330 is also compatible with 13-MacBook Pro models (Late 2012 through Early 2015 generations), and Transcend offers other JetDrive Lite products to fit various 2010–2017 MacBook Air and 2012–2015 MacBook Pro models with different SD card slot designs.

Transcend offers a JetDrive Toolbox app for Mac and Windows that supports a couple of functions like tools for recovering deleted files and automatically unmounting and remounting the card depending on your machine’s standby status in order to save power, but unfortunately, it’s not compatible with M1-based Macs.

Note: Transcend provided MacRumors with the JetDrive Lite 330 for the purpose of this review. No other compensation was received. MacRumors is an affiliate partner with Amazon. When you click a link and make a purchase, we may receive a small payment, which helps us keep the site running.

This article, “Review: Transcend’s 1TB JetDrive Lite 330 Adds Convenient Removable Storage to Your MacBook Pro” first appeared on MacRumors.com

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Last week, Transcend launched a 1TB version of its JetDrive Lite 330 expansion card for the 14-inch and 16-inch MacBook Pro, giving users a convenient way to add significant amounts of storage to their machines without any extra bulk. I've had a chance to spend some time with the new card, and while there are limitations for some of the things you might want to do with it, the JetDrive Lite 330 can be a very handy addition to your setup.


While the JetDrive Lite 330 is at its heart simply an SD card, the novel aspect of it is that it's designed to specifically fit flush with the MacBook Pro's edge, allowing you to essentially leave the card inserted at all times without having to worry about the card or the slot being damaged from pressure being put on a normal-sized SD card that sticks out a bit.

The JetDrive Lite 330 has a thin plastic face that rests up against the edge of the MacBook Pro, and it provides just enough of a surface to get a fingernail behind it to remove the card. It's a simple but great design that all but guarantees the card will stay in place throughout day-to-day usage, packing your machine in and out of a bag, and more.


Transcend says the JetDrive Lite 330 card offers read speeds of up to 95 MB/s and write speeds of up to 75 MB/s per second, and I came close to that in my testing, with Blackmagic Speed Test registering roughly 90 MB/s and 75 MB/s respectively. That's of course well over an order of magnitude slower than the internal SSD on a MacBook Pro or even a Thunderbolt or USB 3.1+ external drive, but for certain tasks, it's definitely sufficient.


Given the transfer speeds, you definitely can't use the JetDrive Lite 330 as a boot drive or anything where you're rapidly reading and writing data. It's simply not designed for those tasks, but it's ideal as some extra onboard storage for documents, media, and other types of data.

One popular use case for the JetDrive Lite is as an onboard Time Machine backup drive, and the new 1 TB capacity option makes this a more reasonable solution than ever. My 16-inch MacBook Pro has a 1 TB SSD, but only about 230 GB is currently used. It's frequently recommended that your Time Machine drive be at least two or three times as large as the drive you're backing up, in order to have enough room to save a sufficient amount of history, so this new 1 TB JetDrive Pro 330 is perfect for me as a test case.

It should be obvious, but it's important to note that onboard Time Machine storage isn't an ideal solution, as if your Mac is lost or stolen, so is your backup. I back up to an Apple Time Capsule at home (offsite backups would be even safer to protect against larger losses such as a fire or home burglary), but I'm currently doing a lot of international travel and the JetDrive Lite is a great way to tide me over with some sort of backup without needing an online service or potentially cumbersome external drive solutions.

Setting the JetDrive Lite up as a Time Machine drive was incredibly simple, with the card being recognized as a standard drive in Finder immediately after insertion, and then showing up in Time Machine settings as an available backup destination. Once I selected it and initiated Time Machine, it took a little over 80 minutes to complete the initial backup. Subsequent backups have taken no more than a minute or two as Time Machine looks for changes and pushes 500 MB or so onto the card.

Overall, backups are actually much faster and smoother than my usual Time Machine backups over Wi-Fi to the spinning hard drive of my Time Capsule at home. Browsing through Time Machine backups is also smoother.

Banana for scale

Once I'm done with my international travels and back to regularly backing up at home, I'll be able to make more use of the JetDrive Lite 330 for general storage, perhaps bringing some music and photos over that currently live on external drives. Having all of that accessible right from my Mac without having to worry about carrying external drives is nice.

Apple charges $400 to double the storage on a MacBook Pro from 1 TB to 2 TB, and of course a single speedy 2 TB drive has certain benefits over this JetDrive Lite solution, but the reverse is also true. The JetDrive Lite offers additional flexibility as it can be easily added after the fact and can be removed as needed for safe storage or transfer to another machine.

The 1 TB JetDrive Lite 330 is available now for $249.99 from Amazon, and for those who don't need as much storage, there are cheaper 512 GB, 256 GB, and 128 GB options also available.

In addition to the latest 14-inch and 16-inch MacBook Pro models from 2021, the JetDrive Lite 330 is also compatible with 13-MacBook Pro models (Late 2012 through Early 2015 generations), and Transcend offers other JetDrive Lite products to fit various 2010–2017 MacBook Air and 2012–2015 MacBook Pro models with different SD card slot designs.

Transcend offers a JetDrive Toolbox app for Mac and Windows that supports a couple of functions like tools for recovering deleted files and automatically unmounting and remounting the card depending on your machine's standby status in order to save power, but unfortunately, it's not compatible with M1-based Macs.

Note: Transcend provided MacRumors with the JetDrive Lite 330 for the purpose of this review. No other compensation was received. MacRumors is an affiliate partner with Amazon. When you click a link and make a purchase, we may receive a small payment, which helps us keep the site running.
This article, "Review: Transcend's 1TB JetDrive Lite 330 Adds Convenient Removable Storage to Your MacBook Pro" first appeared on MacRumors.com

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Apple Now Selling Two New HidrateSpark Smart Water Bottles With Apple Health Integration

Two new smart water bottles from HidrateSpark are now being sold in Apple’s online and retail stores, allowing users to automatically track their water intake and sync it to Apple Health.



The $80 HidrateSpark PRO STEEL, available in silver or black, is a vacuum-insulated 32-ounce water bottle with both chug and straw lids and an LED puck at the base that lights up in customizable colors and patterns to remind you to drink water throughout the day. The puck also senses your water consumption, transmitting the data via Bluetooth to your phone and on to Apple Health.

The vacuum-insulated bottle can keep liquids cold for up to 24 hours, and the bottle and lid are BPA free and dishwasher-safe while the rechargeable LED puck should be cleaned with a damp cloth.



For a cheaper and lighter option, the 24-ounce HidrateSpark PRO Smart Water Bottle priced at $60 is available in green or black and is made of shatter- and odor-resistant Tritan plastic rather than vacuum-insulated steel. It includes the same LED sensor puck as on the more expensive model and similarly comes with both chug and straw lids and is BPA-free.

The two new bottles join two other HidrateSpark models that were already available through Apple, the 21-ounce HidrateSpark STEEL priced at $70 and the 20-ounce Hidrate Spark 3 priced at $60.

This article, “Apple Now Selling Two New HidrateSpark Smart Water Bottles With Apple Health Integration” first appeared on MacRumors.com

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Two new smart water bottles from HidrateSpark are now being sold in Apple's online and retail stores, allowing users to automatically track their water intake and sync it to Apple Health.


The $80 HidrateSpark PRO STEEL, available in silver or black, is a vacuum-insulated 32-ounce water bottle with both chug and straw lids and an LED puck at the base that lights up in customizable colors and patterns to remind you to drink water throughout the day. The puck also senses your water consumption, transmitting the data via Bluetooth to your phone and on to Apple Health.

The vacuum-insulated bottle can keep liquids cold for up to 24 hours, and the bottle and lid are BPA free and dishwasher-safe while the rechargeable LED puck should be cleaned with a damp cloth.


For a cheaper and lighter option, the 24-ounce HidrateSpark PRO Smart Water Bottle priced at $60 is available in green or black and is made of shatter- and odor-resistant Tritan plastic rather than vacuum-insulated steel. It includes the same LED sensor puck as on the more expensive model and similarly comes with both chug and straw lids and is BPA-free.

The two new bottles join two other HidrateSpark models that were already available through Apple, the 21-ounce HidrateSpark STEEL priced at $70 and the 20-ounce Hidrate Spark 3 priced at $60.
This article, "Apple Now Selling Two New HidrateSpark Smart Water Bottles With Apple Health Integration" first appeared on MacRumors.com

Discuss this article in our forums