‘The Lullaby of Life’ Comes to Apple Arcade

This week’s addition to the Apple Arcade subscription gaming service is “The Lullaby of Life,” a new title from developer 1 Simple Game that explores the origins of life through a relaxing, immersive, sonic experience.


In The Lullaby of Life you are the catalyst for change in a universe currently inert but filled with potential.

Explore this amazing world that combines relaxation, dexterity and agility, and help it reach its maximum splendor using the power of music to make life bloom.

This adventure has no textual elements, and wearing headphones is highly recommended. Let’s write together a new story about the origin of life!

We’re celebrating that we can finally share our newest launch 🥳🤩. The Lullaby of Life 🎵🎧! The excellent calm and immersive atmosphere is ideal for relaxing. Available only on #AppleArcade!

👉 https://t.co/YDAvPPUBZx pic.twitter.com/TmgPumKdw1

— 1 Simple Game (@1SimpleGame) July 24, 2020

“The Lullaby of Life” is available to ‌Apple Arcade‌ subscribers on the App Store for iPhone, iPad, and Apple TV, as well as in the Mac App Store. ‌Apple Arcade‌ provides ‌iPhone‌, ‌iPad‌, ‌Apple TV‌, and Mac users with access to over 100 games with no in-app purchases or ads for $4.99 per month after a free one-month trial.

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This week's addition to the Apple Arcade subscription gaming service is "The Lullaby of Life," a new title from developer 1 Simple Game that explores the origins of life through a relaxing, immersive, sonic experience.

In The Lullaby of Life you are the catalyst for change in a universe currently inert but filled with potential.

Explore this amazing world that combines relaxation, dexterity and agility, and help it reach its maximum splendor using the power of music to make life bloom.

This adventure has no textual elements, and wearing headphones is highly recommended. Let’s write together a new story about the origin of life!

"The Lullaby of Life" is available to ‌Apple Arcade‌ subscribers on the App Store for iPhone, iPad, and Apple TV, as well as in the Mac App Store. ‌Apple Arcade‌ provides ‌iPhone‌, ‌iPad‌, ‌Apple TV‌, and Mac users with access to over 100 games with no in-app purchases or ads for $4.99 per month after a free one-month trial.
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Inside Apple’s Coronavirus Store Closure Strategies

With Apple gradually reclosing many of its U.S. stores as coronavirus cases increase, The Wall Street Journal has taken a look at Apple’s strategies and criteria for deciding when and where to close stores, viewing the company as a retail bellwether.


As noted by analyst Gene Munster in the video, Apple’s massive cash reserves and its heavy online presence mean that the company can be more aggressive about closing its locations than many other retail companies. As a result, tracking the company’s store closures provides an interesting glimpse of what’s happening in various areas of the country and trends looking forward.

Apple shared a few specific details about its store closure criteria with The Wall Street Journal, noting that it takes into account the following factors from county-level data:

  • Case numbers
  • Positivity rates
  • Hospital, ICU and ventilator usage
  • Asymptomatic testing
  • Other factors

Apple says it uses publicly available data as much as possible, but if that data isn’t available, it will contact public health departments to request it.

Apple closed all of its retail stores outside of Greater China in mid-March, and in mid-May it began reopening most of its U.S. stores. Just a month later, however, Apple began reclosing many of its retail locations, and nearly half of its U.S. stores are currently closed.

This article, “Inside Apple’s Coronavirus Store Closure Strategies” first appeared on MacRumors.com

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With Apple gradually reclosing many of its U.S. stores as coronavirus cases increase, The Wall Street Journal has taken a look at Apple's strategies and criteria for deciding when and where to close stores, viewing the company as a retail bellwether.


As noted by analyst Gene Munster in the video, Apple's massive cash reserves and its heavy online presence mean that the company can be more aggressive about closing its locations than many other retail companies. As a result, tracking the company's store closures provides an interesting glimpse of what's happening in various areas of the country and trends looking forward.


Apple shared a few specific details about its store closure criteria with The Wall Street Journal, noting that it takes into account the following factors from county-level data:
  • Case numbers

  • Positivity rates

  • Hospital, ICU and ventilator usage

  • Asymptomatic testing

  • Other factors
Apple says it uses publicly available data as much as possible, but if that data isn't available, it will contact public health departments to request it.

Apple closed all of its retail stores outside of Greater China in mid-March, and in mid-May it began reopening most of its U.S. stores. Just a month later, however, Apple began reclosing many of its retail locations, and nearly half of its U.S. stores are currently closed.
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Tim Cook’s Appearance at Upcoming Antitrust Hearing Highlights Apple’s Political Balancing Act

Apple CEO Tim Cook is set to join Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos, Alphabet/Google CEO Sundar Pichai, and Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg in an antitrust hearing held by the House Judiciary Antitrust Subcommittee next Monday, but a new report by The Information takes a look at Cook’s reluctance to participate in the hearing and how he and Apple have tried to navigate a polarized political environment.


Some two weeks after the other tech CEOs had agreed to participate in the hearing, Cook was still holding out for fear of getting caught up in issues more relevant to those other companies than Apple.

There was a simple reason for his holdout. According to people familiar with his thinking, Cook was firm in his belief that Apple didn’t belong with a group of companies increasingly viewed as antitrust malefactors by lawmakers and regulators, including Amazon, Facebook and Google. What’s more, Cook had spent much of the last four years mostly avoiding the kind of toxic political environment that has engulfed the CEOs of those companies over everything from privacy to censorship to treatment of workers.

But under the pressure of a potential subpoena from Representative David Cicilline, chairman of the committee and a critic of Apple’s App Store policies, Cook ultimately agreed to participate in the hearing.

The report indicates that Cook has spent the better part of a month preparing for the hearing, which may touch on a wide range of subjects from App Store policies to Apple’s disputes with the FBI over providing methods for law enforcement to access locked devices to Apple’s relationships with China.

The full paywalled report goes into much more detail about how Cook has delicately balanced relationships on both ends of the political spectrum, trying to stay above the fray largely by keeping quiet. That approach has helped Apple maintain stability in turbulent times, winning exemptions from tariffs on many of its products and avoiding much of the scrutiny that has been aimed at other tech companies.

Still, Apple and Cook aren’t completely immune to criticism, and it remains to be seen whether next week’s hearing will lead to any action on antitrust and other fronts.

Note: Due to the political or social nature of the discussion regarding this topic, the discussion thread is located in our Political News forum. All forum members and site visitors are welcome to read and follow the thread, but posting is limited to forum members with at least 100 posts.

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Apple CEO Tim Cook is set to join Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos, Alphabet/Google CEO Sundar Pichai, and Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg in an antitrust hearing held by the House Judiciary Antitrust Subcommittee next Monday, but a new report by The Information takes a look at Cook's reluctance to participate in the hearing and how he and Apple have tried to navigate a polarized political environment.


Some two weeks after the other tech CEOs had agreed to participate in the hearing, Cook was still holding out for fear of getting caught up in issues more relevant to those other companies than Apple.
There was a simple reason for his holdout. According to people familiar with his thinking, Cook was firm in his belief that Apple didn't belong with a group of companies increasingly viewed as antitrust malefactors by lawmakers and regulators, including Amazon, Facebook and Google. What’s more, Cook had spent much of the last four years mostly avoiding the kind of toxic political environment that has engulfed the CEOs of those companies over everything from privacy to censorship to treatment of workers.
But under the pressure of a potential subpoena from Representative David Cicilline, chairman of the committee and a critic of Apple's App Store policies, Cook ultimately agreed to participate in the hearing.

The report indicates that Cook has spent the better part of a month preparing for the hearing, which may touch on a wide range of subjects from App Store policies to Apple's disputes with the FBI over providing methods for law enforcement to access locked devices to Apple's relationships with China.

The full paywalled report goes into much more detail about how Cook has delicately balanced relationships on both ends of the political spectrum, trying to stay above the fray largely by keeping quiet. That approach has helped Apple maintain stability in turbulent times, winning exemptions from tariffs on many of its products and avoiding much of the scrutiny that has been aimed at other tech companies.

Still, Apple and Cook aren't completely immune to criticism, and it remains to be seen whether next week's hearing will lead to any action on antitrust and other fronts.

Note: Due to the political or social nature of the discussion regarding this topic, the discussion thread is located in our Political News forum. All forum members and site visitors are welcome to read and follow the thread, but posting is limited to forum members with at least 100 posts.
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Apple Celebrates 25 Years of the Apple Distinguished Educator Program

Apple today celebrated the 25th anniversary of its Apple Distinguished Educator program by sharing a profile of Tennessee Tech University professor Carl Owens, one of more than 3,000 educators from 45 countries who have been part of the program over the years.


Owens, who is retiring at the end of this year after a 40-year career in education, is a professor in Tennessee Tech’s College of Education and he has relied on Apple products since the original Macintosh in 1984, including in his classes and the learning resource center he runs.

“Apple cut its teeth in education,” says Owens. “In the beginning, before the iPhone or iPad, Apple was the company that had a computer that enabled educators to become greater than what they ever knew they could be.”

Owens has been provisioning each of his students with an ‌iPad‌ for years and uses Apple products to help teach them how to imagine different and creative ways to approach learning.

Collaboration and remote learning have been an emphasis for Owens over the years, and so he was naturally a key figure at Tennessee Tech when the global health crisis began shutting down campuses around the world.

The Apple Distinguished Educator program fosters an international community of K–12 and higher-education teachers focused on innovation, excellence, and leadership tied into the use of Apple products, and is an application-based program.

This article, “Apple Celebrates 25 Years of the Apple Distinguished Educator Program” first appeared on MacRumors.com

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Apple today celebrated the 25th anniversary of its Apple Distinguished Educator program by sharing a profile of Tennessee Tech University professor Carl Owens, one of more than 3,000 educators from 45 countries who have been part of the program over the years.


Owens, who is retiring at the end of this year after a 40-year career in education, is a professor in Tennessee Tech's College of Education and he has relied on Apple products since the original Macintosh in 1984, including in his classes and the learning resource center he runs.
“Apple cut its teeth in education,” says Owens. “In the beginning, before the iPhone or iPad, Apple was the company that had a computer that enabled educators to become greater than what they ever knew they could be.”

Owens has been provisioning each of his students with an ‌iPad‌ for years and uses Apple products to help teach them how to imagine different and creative ways to approach learning.
Collaboration and remote learning have been an emphasis for Owens over the years, and so he was naturally a key figure at Tennessee Tech when the global health crisis began shutting down campuses around the world.

The Apple Distinguished Educator program fosters an international community of K–12 and higher-education teachers focused on innovation, excellence, and leadership tied into the use of Apple products, and is an application-based program.
This article, "Apple Celebrates 25 Years of the Apple Distinguished Educator Program" first appeared on MacRumors.com

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Apple Celebrates 30 Years of the Americans With Disabilities Act

Apple today shared a new feature celebrating the 30th anniversary of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), which was signed into law on July 26, 1990. The law prohibits discrimination due to disability, and has led to significant improvements and awareness of accessibility to help disabled individuals navigate their worlds.


Apple has long been a champion of accessibility in its products, including numerous features and technologies as core components of its products, operating systems, and apps. The company’s feature piece today shares quotes from an Apple employee, ADA activists, and others about both the overall benefits of the ADA and the part Apple has played in the movement.

Jazz musician Matthew Whitaker, who is blind, shares his thoughts on using VoiceOver on an iPod touch as a child, and has graduated to using Logic Pro X on a MacBook Pro to record his music.

Disability rights lawyer Haben Girma was the first Deafblind student at Harvard Law School, where she focused her studies on the intersection of the ADA and technology and has since helped push forward ADA accommodations in the online world.

Actor and model Tatiana Lee, who is paralyzed from the waist down due to spina bifida, discusses her efforts to support disability representation in Hollywood films and how Apple’s technology like Voice to Text and Siri Shortcuts helps her be productive even when her hands are occupied performing other tasks.

And finally, Dean Hudson, an accessibility technology evangelist at Apple, talks about the strides Apple has made since he arrived in 2006, including VoiceOver for iPhone and the more recent Switch Control.

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Apple today shared a new feature celebrating the 30th anniversary of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), which was signed into law on July 26, 1990. The law prohibits discrimination due to disability, and has led to significant improvements and awareness of accessibility to help disabled individuals navigate their worlds.


Apple has long been a champion of accessibility in its products, including numerous features and technologies as core components of its products, operating systems, and apps. The company's feature piece today shares quotes from an Apple employee, ADA activists, and others about both the overall benefits of the ADA and the part Apple has played in the movement.

Jazz musician Matthew Whitaker, who is blind, shares his thoughts on using VoiceOver on an iPod touch as a child, and has graduated to using Logic Pro X on a MacBook Pro to record his music.

Disability rights lawyer Haben Girma was the first Deafblind student at Harvard Law School, where she focused her studies on the intersection of the ADA and technology and has since helped push forward ADA accommodations in the online world.

Actor and model Tatiana Lee, who is paralyzed from the waist down due to spina bifida, discusses her efforts to support disability representation in Hollywood films and how Apple's technology like Voice to Text and Siri Shortcuts helps her be productive even when her hands are occupied performing other tasks.

And finally, Dean Hudson, an accessibility technology evangelist at Apple, talks about the strides Apple has made since he arrived in 2006, including VoiceOver for iPhone and the more recent Switch Control.
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Apple Moving Forward on Semitransparent Lenses for Upcoming AR Headset

Apple and Foxconn have reached a key milestone in the development of Apple’s long-rumored augmented reality headset, with the semitransparent lenses for the device moving from prototype to trial production, reports The Information.


Apple is developing the lenses on a single production line at a Foxconn factory in Chengdu in southwestern China, where most of Apple’s iPad production is centered, the person said.

Apple has multiple phases in the development of new products, starting with periods of prototyping in California and China, during which it makes dozens and hundreds of units, respectively, of the products and their parts. As of May, the lenses had entered a stage known as engineering validation test, or EVT, during which Apple typically makes thousands of units, said the person familiar with the matter. During that period, Apple has locked down the design and begins testing its suitability for mass production.

The report indicates that the lenses (and thus the headset itself) are still at least a year or two away from mass production, and various rumors have pointed toward a launch around 2022.

A recent report from Bloomberg‘s Mark Gurman indicated that Apple’s AR and VR projects have been hampered by internal divisions over whether Apple should emphasize graphics and processing power in a design that would connect wirelessly to a nearby hub or a more personal approach with lesser capabilities but which can be contained entirely within the headset.

Apple is said to have multiple AR and VR projects in the works beyond the initial headset, known by the code name of N301, with a sleeker pair of AR glasses known as N421 that could launch in 2023.

Related Roundup: Apple Glasses

This article, “Apple Moving Forward on Semitransparent Lenses for Upcoming AR Headset” first appeared on MacRumors.com

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Apple and Foxconn have reached a key milestone in the development of Apple's long-rumored augmented reality headset, with the semitransparent lenses for the device moving from prototype to trial production, reports The Information.


Apple is developing the lenses on a single production line at a Foxconn factory in Chengdu in southwestern China, where most of Apple’s iPad production is centered, the person said.

Apple has multiple phases in the development of new products, starting with periods of prototyping in California and China, during which it makes dozens and hundreds of units, respectively, of the products and their parts. As of May, the lenses had entered a stage known as engineering validation test, or EVT, during which Apple typically makes thousands of units, said the person familiar with the matter. During that period, Apple has locked down the design and begins testing its suitability for mass production.
The report indicates that the lenses (and thus the headset itself) are still at least a year or two away from mass production, and various rumors have pointed toward a launch around 2022.

A recent report from Bloomberg's Mark Gurman indicated that Apple's AR and VR projects have been hampered by internal divisions over whether Apple should emphasize graphics and processing power in a design that would connect wirelessly to a nearby hub or a more personal approach with lesser capabilities but which can be contained entirely within the headset.

Apple is said to have multiple AR and VR projects in the works beyond the initial headset, known by the code name of N301, with a sleeker pair of AR glasses known as N421 that could launch in 2023.
Related Roundup: Apple Glasses

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Epic’s ‘Live Link Face’ Leverages ARKit and iPhone’s TrueDepth Camera for Real-Time Facial Animation

Epic Games has launched a new iOS app, Live Link Face, that lets creators using the company’s Unreal Engine game engine leverage Apple’s ARKit platform and the iPhone‘s TrueDepth camera to capture and stream facial expressions for real-time rendering (via The Verge).


Capable of working with just a single actor at a desk or as part of a complex motion-capture stage setup, Live Link Face supports timecode syncing to ensure it stays synchronized with any other recording devices involved in the capture process.

And when used at a desk setup, Live Link Face can track head and neck rotation data in addition to facial expressions, for more realistic avatar behavior using nothing more than an ‌iPhone‌.

For more details on what Live Link Face can do, check out Epic’s blog post.

This article, “Epic’s ‘Live Link Face’ Leverages ARKit and iPhone’s TrueDepth Camera for Real-Time Facial Animation” first appeared on MacRumors.com

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Epic Games has launched a new iOS app, Live Link Face, that lets creators using the company's Unreal Engine game engine leverage Apple's ARKit platform and the iPhone's TrueDepth camera to capture and stream facial expressions for real-time rendering (via The Verge).


Capable of working with just a single actor at a desk or as part of a complex motion-capture stage setup, Live Link Face supports timecode syncing to ensure it stays synchronized with any other recording devices involved in the capture process.

And when used at a desk setup, Live Link Face can track head and neck rotation data in addition to facial expressions, for more realistic avatar behavior using nothing more than an ‌iPhone‌.

For more details on what Live Link Face can do, check out Epic's blog post.
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Apple Launches New Educational Curricula for Develop in Swift and Everyone Can Code

Apple today announced significant enhancements for its Develop in Swift and Everyone Can Code educational programs, delivering free curricula and a new Develop in Swift online course to help teachers get up to speed for teaching app development in Swift.


“Apple has worked alongside educators for 40 years, and we’re especially proud to see how Develop in Swift and Everyone Can Code have been instrumental in helping teachers and students make an impact in their communities,” said Susan Prescott, Apple’s vice president of Markets, Apps, and Services. “We’ve seen community college students build food security apps for their campus and watched middle school educators host virtual coding clubs over summer break. As part of our commitment to help expand access to computer science education, we are thrilled to be adding a new professional learning course to help more educators, regardless of their experience, have the opportunity to learn coding and teach the next generation of developers and designers.”

Develop in Swift, which is aimed at students in high school and above, has seen its curriculum completely redesigned and includes four free books available through Apple Books: “Develop in Swift Explorations,” “Develop in Swift AP CS Principles,” “Develop in Swift Fundamentals,” and “Develop in Swift Data Collections,” with the first three available now and the fourth coming this fall.

For younger students and other beginners, Apple is also expanding its Everyone Can Code curriculum, launching a new “Everyone Can Code Adventures” book that builds on previous content in the program to allow for more advanced coding exercises using Swift Playgrounds.

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Apple today announced significant enhancements for its Develop in Swift and Everyone Can Code educational programs, delivering free curricula and a new Develop in Swift online course to help teachers get up to speed for teaching app development in Swift.

“Apple has worked alongside educators for 40 years, and we’re especially proud to see how Develop in Swift and Everyone Can Code have been instrumental in helping teachers and students make an impact in their communities,” said Susan Prescott, Apple’s vice president of Markets, Apps, and Services. “We’ve seen community college students build food security apps for their campus and watched middle school educators host virtual coding clubs over summer break. As part of our commitment to help expand access to computer science education, we are thrilled to be adding a new professional learning course to help more educators, regardless of their experience, have the opportunity to learn coding and teach the next generation of developers and designers.”
Develop in Swift, which is aimed at students in high school and above, has seen its curriculum completely redesigned and includes four free books available through Apple Books: "Develop in Swift Explorations," "Develop in Swift AP CS Principles," "Develop in Swift Fundamentals," and "Develop in Swift Data Collections," with the first three available now and the fourth coming this fall.

For younger students and other beginners, Apple is also expanding its Everyone Can Code curriculum, launching a new "Everyone Can Code Adventures" book that builds on previous content in the program to allow for more advanced coding exercises using Swift Playgrounds.
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OWC’s ThunderBay Flex 8 Storage and Expansion Tower for Macs Now Available

Popular Mac accessory maker OWC today announced the launch of its ThunderBay Flex 8 tower for media professionals, offering eight drive bays, a handful of ports for connecting peripherals, and a PCIe slot for expansion capabilities, all connected to your Mac over Thunderbolt 3.


The ThunderBay Flex 8 resembles a black version of the Power Mac G5 and original Mac Pro design, and it opens up to reveal eight SATA/SAS drive bays capable of accepting both 3.5-inch and 2.5-inch drives, with the top four bays also able to accept U.2/M.2 NVMe drives. There’s also a PCIe x16 connector/x4 lane slot for adding cards such as audio/video capture or additional SSD storage.


Near the bottom of the front of the ThunderBay Flex 8 is a string of ports for connecting peripherals, including a pair of 10Gb/s USB-A ports, a 10Gb/s USB-C port, and CFexpress and SD 4.0 card readers. On the rear of the tower are a pair of Thunderbolt 3 ports (one upstream and one 15W downstream) and a DisplayPort 1.4 port.

Pricing on the ThunderBay Flex 8 starts at $1,299 for just the enclosure, or it can be ordered with various combinations of drive types and capacities that can push a maxed-out configuration to nearly $8,000.

Note: MacRumors is an affiliate partner with OWC. When you click a link and make a purchase, we may receive a small payment, which helps us keep the site running.

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Popular Mac accessory maker OWC today announced the launch of its ThunderBay Flex 8 tower for media professionals, offering eight drive bays, a handful of ports for connecting peripherals, and a PCIe slot for expansion capabilities, all connected to your Mac over Thunderbolt 3.


The ThunderBay Flex 8 resembles a black version of the Power Mac G5 and original Mac Pro design, and it opens up to reveal eight SATA/SAS drive bays capable of accepting both 3.5-inch and 2.5-inch drives, with the top four bays also able to accept U.2/M.2 NVMe drives. There's also a PCIe x16 connector/x4 lane slot for adding cards such as audio/video capture or additional SSD storage.


Near the bottom of the front of the ThunderBay Flex 8 is a string of ports for connecting peripherals, including a pair of 10Gb/s USB-A ports, a 10Gb/s USB-C port, and CFexpress and SD 4.0 card readers. On the rear of the tower are a pair of Thunderbolt 3 ports (one upstream and one 15W downstream) and a DisplayPort 1.4 port.

Pricing on the ThunderBay Flex 8 starts at $1,299 for just the enclosure, or it can be ordered with various combinations of drive types and capacities that can push a maxed-out configuration to nearly $8,000.

Note: MacRumors is an affiliate partner with OWC. When you click a link and make a purchase, we may receive a small payment, which helps us keep the site running.
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Intel Shares Details on Thunderbolt 4, Launching Later This Year

Intel today shared some new details on the upcoming launch of Thunderbolt 4, which is set debut later this year.

While Thunderbolt 4 won’t deliver any increase over the maximum 40 Gb/s available on Thunderbolt 3, there are some notable improvements such as universal cables up to two meters long without needing to resort to active cables that omit support for slower USB standards as on Thunderbolt 3, the ability to support docks and other accessories with up to four Thunderbolt 4 ports (one upstream, three downstream), and more.

Thunderbolt 4 certification requirements include:

  • Double the minimum video and data requirements of Thunderbolt 3.
    • Video: Support for two 4K displays or one 8K display.
    • Data: PCIe at 32 Gbps for storage speeds up to 3,000 MBps.

  • Support for docks with up to four Thunderbolt 4 ports.
  • PC charging on at least one computer port.
  • Wake your computer from sleep by touching the keyboard or mouse when connected to a Thunderbolt dock.
  • Required Intel VT-d-based direct memory access (DMA) protection that helps prevent physical DMA attacks.

Thunderbolt 4 ports and cables are fully backward and cross-compatible with USB4, Thunderbolt 3, and other USB standards, and it continues to use the USB-C physical connector design.


Thunderbolt 4 will be coming first to Intel’s upcoming Tiger Lake processors for notebooks, with separate 8000-series controller chips coming later this year.

Apple, of course, has just announced that it will be transitioning away from Intel processors to its own Apple Silicon chips across its Mac lineup over the next couple of years, and it remains to be seen how Apple will handle Thunderbolt support going forward. The A12Z-based Mac mini units Apple is distributing to developers to help them prepare their apps for the transition do not include any Thunderbolt 3 ports.

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Intel today shared some new details on the upcoming launch of Thunderbolt 4, which is set debut later this year.


While Thunderbolt 4 won't deliver any increase over the maximum 40 Gb/s available on Thunderbolt 3, there are some notable improvements such as universal cables up to two meters long without needing to resort to active cables that omit support for slower USB standards as on Thunderbolt 3, the ability to support docks and other accessories with up to four Thunderbolt 4 ports (one upstream, three downstream), and more.
Thunderbolt 4 certification requirements include:

  • Double the minimum video and data requirements of Thunderbolt 3.
    • Video: Support for two 4K displays or one 8K display.

    • Data: PCIe at 32 Gbps for storage speeds up to 3,000 MBps.

  • Support for docks with up to four Thunderbolt 4 ports.

  • PC charging on at least one computer port.

  • Wake your computer from sleep by touching the keyboard or mouse when connected to a Thunderbolt dock.

  • Required Intel VT-d-based direct memory access (DMA) protection that helps prevent physical DMA attacks.
Thunderbolt 4 ports and cables are fully backward and cross-compatible with USB4, Thunderbolt 3, and other USB standards, and it continues to use the USB-C physical connector design.


Thunderbolt 4 will be coming first to Intel's upcoming Tiger Lake processors for notebooks, with separate 8000-series controller chips coming later this year.

Apple, of course, has just announced that it will be transitioning away from Intel processors to its own Apple Silicon chips across its Mac lineup over the next couple of years, and it remains to be seen how Apple will handle Thunderbolt support going forward. The A12Z-based Mac mini units Apple is distributing to developers to help them prepare their apps for the transition do not include any Thunderbolt 3 ports.
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