Apple Details Why Some Apple Card Applicants Might Get Declined

Apple last week announced an Apple Card Preview period and has since been rolling out Apple Card availability to many iPhone users ahead of a wider launch.

Apple aimed to make the Apple Card available to as many people as possible and there have been reports of people with credit scores in the 600s being approved, but there are still reasons why someone might get denied.


In a new support document shared today, Apple outlines the various reasons why someone might be declined, including low credit score, frequent credit card applications, heavy debt and low income, tax liens, bankruptcy, property repossession, past due debt obligations, a recent checking account closure by a bank, past due medical debt, and more.

Apple’s support document has a detailed list of explanations for those who were declined, and when you apply for Apple Card, if you are declined by Goldman Sachs (Apple’s partner) you’ll get a reason why so you can cross reference it here for more information.


The document also explains how credit scores are determined (debt payments, hard credit inquiries, debt level, credit age, open loans, and more), and it details how customers can get a free credit score copy and dispute errors with TransUnion if mistakenly declined for a card. Apple recommends customers check for common errors that can be included in a credit report if there’s an issue.

For customers who were declined because their identity could not be verified, Apple offers several recommendations such as verifying that application info is accurate and making sure ID scans (when requested) are clear and include an ID that’s not expired and with a last name that matches the application.

When requesting an Apple Card, Goldman Sachs does a soft credit check that does not impact your credit score. Being declined or declining Apple’s offer will not require a hard inquiry, which is only done when you actually accept the Apple Card.

Apple says that credit limit is determined by income and minimum payment amounts associated with existing debt, which is used to assess ability to pay.

Right now, Apple Card is limited to customers who have received an invite from Apple, but Apple appears to be sending out quite a lot of invitations to those who have signed up to be notified about Apple Card on the Apple Card website. A wide release for Apple Card could come in the next few weeks.

For more on how Apple Card works and what you can expect, make sure to check out our detailed Apple Card guide.

This article, “Apple Details Why Some Apple Card Applicants Might Get Declined” first appeared on MacRumors.com

Discuss this article in our forums

Apple last week announced an Apple Card Preview period and has since been rolling out Apple Card availability to many iPhone users ahead of a wider launch.

Apple aimed to make the Apple Card available to as many people as possible and there have been reports of people with credit scores in the 600s being approved, but there are still reasons why someone might get denied.


In a new support document shared today, Apple outlines the various reasons why someone might be declined, including low credit score, frequent credit card applications, heavy debt and low income, tax liens, bankruptcy, property repossession, past due debt obligations, a recent checking account closure by a bank, past due medical debt, and more.

Apple's support document has a detailed list of explanations for those who were declined, and when you apply for Apple Card, if you are declined by Goldman Sachs (Apple's partner) you'll get a reason why so you can cross reference it here for more information.


The document also explains how credit scores are determined (debt payments, hard credit inquiries, debt level, credit age, open loans, and more), and it details how customers can get a free credit score copy and dispute errors with TransUnion if mistakenly declined for a card. Apple recommends customers check for common errors that can be included in a credit report if there's an issue.

For customers who were declined because their identity could not be verified, Apple offers several recommendations such as verifying that application info is accurate and making sure ID scans (when requested) are clear and include an ID that's not expired and with a last name that matches the application.

When requesting an Apple Card, Goldman Sachs does a soft credit check that does not impact your credit score. Being declined or declining Apple's offer will not require a hard inquiry, which is only done when you actually accept the Apple Card.

Apple says that credit limit is determined by income and minimum payment amounts associated with existing debt, which is used to assess ability to pay.

Right now, Apple Card is limited to customers who have received an invite from Apple, but Apple appears to be sending out quite a lot of invitations to those who have signed up to be notified about Apple Card on the Apple Card website. A wide release for Apple Card could come in the next few weeks.

For more on how Apple Card works and what you can expect, make sure to check out our detailed Apple Card guide.


This article, "Apple Details Why Some Apple Card Applicants Might Get Declined" first appeared on MacRumors.com

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PSA: Apple Email Asks Users Who Signed Up for Apple Card Invite to Provide Correct Apple ID, Even if They Did Already

Apple customers who registered their interest in gaining early access to Apple Card were left confused last night after receiving an email from Apple asking for their Apple ID, despite having already provided it.


Since early August, Apple users have been signing up on Apple’s website to be notified early about the release of Apple Card. Apple has since sent out email invitations for an “Apple Card Preview” to some of those customers. However, it looks as though an error has cropped up in Apple’s invite system as the second wave of customers starts to be processed.

The latest Apple email sent out to customers claims that their “early-access invitation is waiting,” but that the email address they used when they originally signed up for an Apple Card invite doesn’t match an existing Apple ID on record. The message reads:

You wanted to be one of the first to get Apple Card — a new kind of credit card created by Apple, not a bank. Good news: Here’s your chance to experience Apple Card before everybody else, so you can help us get ready for the public launch. Your early access invitation is waiting, but we need your Apple ID to send it. The email address you provided does not match an Apple ID signed in to iCloud. Just complete a few simple steps so we can send your invitation.

The email then provides steps for the user to check their Apple ID on iPhone and re-enter it at www.apple.com/apple-card to ensure they get notified, after which “invitations may take up to 48 hours to arrive.”

While it’s important to stay vigilant and report phishing attempts to Apple, in this case the “Notify Me” link provided in the email checks out and the raw email headers show the sender address is genuinely from Apple.

There are multiple reports on Reddit of people receiving the email who are 100 percent sure they signed up with the correct Apple ID email address. MacRumors also received the email – we’re also very confident the right address was used – which suggests an erroneous communication has been sent out to hundreds, if not thousands of users, causing initial excitement swiftly followed by bemusement.

Got my email to sign up for Apple Card today and it’s saying my iCloud email is incorrect yet it’s the one they emailed the invite to and the only iCloud account I’ve ever had in over a decade+. I saw on reddit lots ppl w same issue. Will it be fixed soon? @Apple @AppleSupport

— TJ (@solongtj) August 14, 2019

Several users have contacted Apple Support, who are apparently aware of the issue and it has been forwarded to the Apple Card engineering team. Still, it’s worth noting that some users may have also received the email for the right reason – because they didn’t use the email address associated with their Apple account.

Needless to say, if you did sign up for the Apple Card invitation, make sure you used the proper Apple ID email address. If you can’t remember whether you did or not, consider signing up again, otherwise it could delay your invitation by a few days.

Once customers receive their actual email invitation to the Apple Card Preview, they can sign up for Apple Card in the Wallet app on the iPhone or by going to Settings > Wallet & Apple Pay on the iPad.

Apple Card is limited to the United States at the current time, but may expand to additional countries in the near future. Apple is already in talks with European regulators, and has trademarked Apple Card in Europe, Hong Kong, and Canada.

This article, “PSA: Apple Email Asks Users Who Signed Up for Apple Card Invite to Provide Correct Apple ID, Even if They Did Already” first appeared on MacRumors.com

Discuss this article in our forums

Apple customers who registered their interest in gaining early access to Apple Card were left confused last night after receiving an email from Apple asking for their Apple ID, despite having already provided it.


Since early August, Apple users have been signing up on Apple's website to be notified early about the release of Apple Card. Apple has since sent out email invitations for an "Apple Card Preview" to some of those customers. However, it looks as though an error has cropped up in Apple's invite system as the second wave of customers starts to be processed.

The latest Apple email sent out to customers claims that their "early-access invitation is waiting," but that the email address they used when they originally signed up for an Apple Card invite doesn't match an existing Apple ID on record. The message reads:
You wanted to be one of the first to get Apple Card — a new kind of credit card created by Apple, not a bank. Good news: Here's your chance to experience Apple Card before everybody else, so you can help us get ready for the public launch. Your early access invitation is waiting, but we need your Apple ID to send it. The email address you provided does not match an Apple ID signed in to iCloud. Just complete a few simple steps so we can send your invitation.
The email then provides steps for the user to check their Apple ID on iPhone and re-enter it at www.apple.com/apple-card to ensure they get notified, after which "invitations may take up to 48 hours to arrive."

While it's important to stay vigilant and report phishing attempts to Apple, in this case the "Notify Me" link provided in the email checks out and the raw email headers show the sender address is genuinely from Apple.

There are multiple reports on Reddit of people receiving the email who are 100 percent sure they signed up with the correct Apple ID email address. MacRumors also received the email – we're also very confident the right address was used – which suggests an erroneous communication has been sent out to hundreds, if not thousands of users, causing initial excitement swiftly followed by bemusement.


Several users have contacted Apple Support, who are apparently aware of the issue and it has been forwarded to the Apple Card engineering team. Still, it's worth noting that some users may have also received the email for the right reason – because they didn't use the email address associated with their Apple account.

Needless to say, if you did sign up for the Apple Card invitation, make sure you used the proper Apple ID email address. If you can't remember whether you did or not, consider signing up again, otherwise it could delay your invitation by a few days.

Once customers receive their actual email invitation to the Apple Card Preview, they can sign up for Apple Card in the Wallet app on the iPhone or by going to Settings > Wallet & Apple Pay on the iPad.

Apple Card is limited to the United States at the current time, but may expand to additional countries in the near future. Apple is already in talks with European regulators, and has trademarked Apple Card in Europe, Hong Kong, and Canada.


This article, "PSA: Apple Email Asks Users Who Signed Up for Apple Card Invite to Provide Correct Apple ID, Even if They Did Already" first appeared on MacRumors.com

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Hands-On With Apple Card

Apple last week began allowing some iPhone users to sign up for Apple Card as part of a limited test ahead of a wider launch, and we got our hands on one of the new cards.

In our latest YouTube video, we highlight the Apple Card sign up process, how it works, what it looks like, and how the titanium card feels in person for those who haven’t yet had a chance to sign up.

Subscribe to the MacRumors YouTube channel for more videos.

Apple Card, which Apple created in partnership with Goldman Sachs, is a credit card that’s designed to be simple, straightforward, and easy to use, making it ideal for those who are new to credit cards or who are looking for something no-frills that’s easy to understand.

Signing up for Apple Card can be done in the Wallet app, and the entire process takes just a couple of minutes from the time that you enter your name, address, and other info to approval or rejection.

Your APR (interest rate) and your credit limit are based on your credit score, and Apple is aiming to make the Apple Card available to most people so even those with scores in the 600s have reported being approved.

Once you’ve signed up for Apple Card, you can use it right away for Apple Pay purchases both in stores and online because it’s deeply integrated into the iPhone. It works like any other credit card you’ve added to Apple Pay. At the same time, Apple sends you a physical titanium card in the mail that can be used where Apple Pay isn’t available. It takes a few days for the titanium card to arrive, and it’s worth the wait.

The titanium Apple Card is uniquely Apple, featuring a simple design that’s engraved with your name and no other information. There’s no card number, CVV, or expiration date on the card, though there is a chip and a traditional magstripe for purchases.

Your card number, CVV, and expiration date can be found inside the Wallet app if you need that info for online purchases where Apple Pay isn’t accepted. Your card number can even be changed on a semi-regular basis, which means it’s more secure than a traditional credit card. That’s one of the main benefits of the Apple Card.

The titanium card is hefty and it weighs more than your average plastic credit card, plus it’s about twice as thick. It’s a statement card for sure, and it stands out when you use it. When you use either your physical Apple Card or the digital Apple Pay version, Apple tracks all of your purchases in detail, which is the other major Apple Card benefit.

There’s a virtual card in the Wallet app that starts out white but changes color based on what you’re buying. Apple organizes all of your purchases into different categories that each have a color, making it easy to see what you’re spending your money on each month. Apple offers detailed purchase tracking, full merchant name info (so no purchase is ever ambiguous), and instant notifications when you make a purchase (so you know right away if something’s charged you didn’t authorize).

Apple Card doesn’t offer benefits like extended warranties or purchase protection, but it does have a cash back feature that’s paid out each day. You get 3% cash back on purchases made from Apple (or its digital stores), 2% cash back on all Apple Pay purchases, and 1% cash back for all other purchases with the titanium card.

Cash is paid out at the end of each day and is added to your Apple Cash card, also in the Wallet app. The Apple Cash card can be used for purchases or the balance can be transferred to your bank account.

Payments are made in the Wallet app through a linked bank account, and it’s worth noting that there is no web option. That’s potentially going to be a hassle if you lose your iPhone and need to make a payment, but your Apple Card can be managed on your other iOS devices too.

When it comes to payments, Apple’s aiming to make it so you pay as little interest as possible. Apple will send reminders when payment is due, encourage you to make extra payments to cut down on interest, and help you understand exactly how much interest you’re going to be charged.

Apple Card can’t match other cards when it comes to benefits, travel rewards, and specific cash back options, but where it does win out over other cards is its deep integration into the Wallet app and the effort Apple put in to making it understandable.

Your purchases are clearly outlined, your spending is tracked across different categories so you can better budget and track your money, and payment information is optimized for your benefit, rather than the benefit of the credit card company.

For more on Apple Card, make sure to check out our comprehensive Apple Card guide.

This article, “Hands-On With Apple Card” first appeared on MacRumors.com

Discuss this article in our forums

Apple last week began allowing some iPhone users to sign up for Apple Card as part of a limited test ahead of a wider launch, and we got our hands on one of the new cards.

In our latest YouTube video, we highlight the Apple Card sign up process, how it works, what it looks like, and how the titanium card feels in person for those who haven't yet had a chance to sign up.

Subscribe to the MacRumors YouTube channel for more videos.

Apple Card, which Apple created in partnership with Goldman Sachs, is a credit card that's designed to be simple, straightforward, and easy to use, making it ideal for those who are new to credit cards or who are looking for something no-frills that's easy to understand.

Signing up for Apple Card can be done in the Wallet app, and the entire process takes just a couple of minutes from the time that you enter your name, address, and other info to approval or rejection.

Your APR (interest rate) and your credit limit are based on your credit score, and Apple is aiming to make the Apple Card available to most people so even those with scores in the 600s have reported being approved.

Once you've signed up for Apple Card, you can use it right away for Apple Pay purchases both in stores and online because it's deeply integrated into the iPhone. It works like any other credit card you've added to Apple Pay. At the same time, Apple sends you a physical titanium card in the mail that can be used where Apple Pay isn't available. It takes a few days for the titanium card to arrive, and it's worth the wait.

The titanium Apple Card is uniquely Apple, featuring a simple design that's engraved with your name and no other information. There's no card number, CVV, or expiration date on the card, though there is a chip and a traditional magstripe for purchases.

Your card number, CVV, and expiration date can be found inside the Wallet app if you need that info for online purchases where Apple Pay isn't accepted. Your card number can even be changed on a semi-regular basis, which means it's more secure than a traditional credit card. That's one of the main benefits of the Apple Card.

The titanium card is hefty and it weighs more than your average plastic credit card, plus it's about twice as thick. It's a statement card for sure, and it stands out when you use it. When you use either your physical Apple Card or the digital Apple Pay version, Apple tracks all of your purchases in detail, which is the other major Apple Card benefit.

There's a virtual card in the Wallet app that starts out white but changes color based on what you're buying. Apple organizes all of your purchases into different categories that each have a color, making it easy to see what you're spending your money on each month. Apple offers detailed purchase tracking, full merchant name info (so no purchase is ever ambiguous), and instant notifications when you make a purchase (so you know right away if something's charged you didn't authorize).

Apple Card doesn't offer benefits like extended warranties or purchase protection, but it does have a cash back feature that's paid out each day. You get 3% cash back on purchases made from Apple (or its digital stores), 2% cash back on all Apple Pay purchases, and 1% cash back for all other purchases with the titanium card.

Cash is paid out at the end of each day and is added to your Apple Cash card, also in the Wallet app. The Apple Cash card can be used for purchases or the balance can be transferred to your bank account.

Payments are made in the Wallet app through a linked bank account, and it's worth noting that there is no web option. That's potentially going to be a hassle if you lose your iPhone and need to make a payment, but your Apple Card can be managed on your other iOS devices too.

When it comes to payments, Apple's aiming to make it so you pay as little interest as possible. Apple will send reminders when payment is due, encourage you to make extra payments to cut down on interest, and help you understand exactly how much interest you're going to be charged.

Apple Card can't match other cards when it comes to benefits, travel rewards, and specific cash back options, but where it does win out over other cards is its deep integration into the Wallet app and the effort Apple put in to making it understandable.

Your purchases are clearly outlined, your spending is tracked across different categories so you can better budget and track your money, and payment information is optimized for your benefit, rather than the benefit of the credit card company.

For more on Apple Card, make sure to check out our comprehensive Apple Card guide.


This article, "Hands-On With Apple Card" first appeared on MacRumors.com

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Apple Card Begins Arriving to Customers, Wide Range of Credit Scores Reportedly Being Approved

Following the Apple Card’s rollout to a limited number of customers in the Wallet app earlier this week, some are beginning to receive their physical, titanium Apple Card in the mail for use at stores that do not accept contactless payments.

The Verge‘s Nilay Patel has shared photos of his Apple Card, revealing that it is thicker than his other metal and plastic credit cards. It was earlier reported that the Apple Card weighs around 14.75 grams, making it slightly heavier than the Chase Sapphire Reserve credit card but lighter than an American Express Gold.

Physical Apple Card has arrived. I have surprisingly strong feelings about having a Goldman Sachs logo in my life? Anyway, you can see how much thicker it is than my plastic or metal cards. pic.twitter.com/hXi3q4ijoJ

— nilay patel (@reckless) August 9, 2019

Card weights from my crappy kitchen scale (ignore coffee detritus)
1. Apple Card 14.7g (quoted is 14.8 so probably rounded up)
2. AMEX platinum 18.4g
3. Chase Sapphire Preferred 12.2g pic.twitter.com/bCZMpmUhNN

— Matthew Panzarino (@panzer) August 7, 2019

Another early adopter, Aaron Andino, has shared an Apple Card unboxing video on YouTube that provides a closer look at its packaging. The card and packaging look consistent with pre-launch photos that leaked.

The physical Apple Card, made out of titanium, features a clean design with an Apple logo, a chip, and a name. There’s no card number or expiration date on the card, nor is there a CVV on the back. Instead, these details are stored in the Wallet app for added security in the event the card is lost or stolen.

The back of the Apple Card also has a minimalistic design with embossed Goldman Sachs and Mastercard logos and a magstripe. Goldman Sachs is the Apple Card’s issuing bank, and it relies on the Mastercard payment network.

Read our step-by-step instructions on how to order a physical Apple Card by mail. The card ships free of charge and a notification is sent to your iPhone when it ships. The turnaround time appears to be a few days right now.


Later this month, Apple will allow all U.S. residents age 18 or older to apply for the card. So far, it appears that Goldman Sachs is being quite lenient with approvals, as CNBC and iMore have reported that some customers with credit scores in the 600s have been approved, albeit with lower credit limits and higher APRs.

When fully available, iPhone users can apply for the Apple Card in the Wallet app within minutes and take advantage of features such as 1-3 percent in daily cash back, color-coded spending summaries, and no fees. Just ahead of launching, the card’s APR range was lowered to 12.99-23.99 percent.

This article, “Apple Card Begins Arriving to Customers, Wide Range of Credit Scores Reportedly Being Approved” first appeared on MacRumors.com

Discuss this article in our forums

Following the Apple Card's rollout to a limited number of customers in the Wallet app earlier this week, some are beginning to receive their physical, titanium Apple Card in the mail for use at stores that do not accept contactless payments.

The Verge's Nilay Patel has shared photos of his Apple Card, revealing that it is thicker than his other metal and plastic credit cards. It was earlier reported that the Apple Card weighs around 14.75 grams, making it slightly heavier than the Chase Sapphire Reserve credit card but lighter than an American Express Gold.



Another early adopter, Aaron Andino, has shared an Apple Card unboxing video on YouTube that provides a closer look at its packaging. The card and packaging look consistent with pre-launch photos that leaked.


The physical Apple Card, made out of titanium, features a clean design with an Apple logo, a chip, and a name. There's no card number or expiration date on the card, nor is there a CVV on the back. Instead, these details are stored in the Wallet app for added security in the event the card is lost or stolen.

The back of the Apple Card also has a minimalistic design with embossed Goldman Sachs and Mastercard logos and a magstripe. Goldman Sachs is the Apple Card's issuing bank, and it relies on the Mastercard payment network.

Read our step-by-step instructions on how to order a physical Apple Card by mail. The card ships free of charge and a notification is sent to your iPhone when it ships. The turnaround time appears to be a few days right now.


Later this month, Apple will allow all U.S. residents age 18 or older to apply for the card. So far, it appears that Goldman Sachs is being quite lenient with approvals, as CNBC and iMore have reported that some customers with credit scores in the 600s have been approved, albeit with lower credit limits and higher APRs.

When fully available, iPhone users can apply for the Apple Card in the Wallet app within minutes and take advantage of features such as 1-3 percent in daily cash back, color-coded spending summaries, and no fees. Just ahead of launching, the card's APR range was lowered to 12.99-23.99 percent.


This article, "Apple Card Begins Arriving to Customers, Wide Range of Credit Scores Reportedly Being Approved" first appeared on MacRumors.com

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Apple Card Doesn’t Support Exporting Data to Financial Apps

With the Apple Card now available in a preview capacity to some customers, Apple has released everything from tutorial videos to support documents, giving us more insight into how the card works.

We’ve had countless questions from people who use software and apps like Mint and Quicken about whether or not the Apple Card will support financial services, and the answer is no, not at this time.


In a support document on how the Apple Card works, Apple says exporting data from Apple Card is not a feature offered at this time. From the document: “Exporting data from Apple Card to a financial app like Mint is not currently supported.”

As financial apps like Mint and software like Quicken are popular with many people, it’s possible that Apple will add support for exporting data in the future. Right now, Apple Card data and transactions can be viewed and managed only on the iPhone and the iPad, with no web support available.

The support document also includes details about viewing spending activity, viewing your monthly balance, seeing total spending each week or month, reviewing transactions, and reporting issues. Apple also has a support doc covering applying for Apple Card.

For more on Apple Card, make sure to check out our Apple Card guide, which we’re in the process of updating with the new information that we’ve learned today.

Apple Card is available in a beta capacity for some users and will see a wider rollout later this month.

This article, “Apple Card Doesn’t Support Exporting Data to Financial Apps” first appeared on MacRumors.com

Discuss this article in our forums

With the Apple Card now available in a preview capacity to some customers, Apple has released everything from tutorial videos to support documents, giving us more insight into how the card works.

We've had countless questions from people who use software and apps like Mint and Quicken about whether or not the Apple Card will support financial services, and the answer is no, not at this time.


In a support document on how the Apple Card works, Apple says exporting data from Apple Card is not a feature offered at this time. From the document: "Exporting data from Apple Card to a financial app like Mint is not currently supported."

As financial apps like Mint and software like Quicken are popular with many people, it's possible that Apple will add support for exporting data in the future. Right now, Apple Card data and transactions can be viewed and managed only on the iPhone and the iPad, with no web support available.

The support document also includes details about viewing spending activity, viewing your monthly balance, seeing total spending each week or month, reviewing transactions, and reporting issues. Apple also has a support doc covering applying for Apple Card.

For more on Apple Card, make sure to check out our Apple Card guide, which we're in the process of updating with the new information that we've learned today.

Apple Card is available in a beta capacity for some users and will see a wider rollout later this month.


This article, "Apple Card Doesn't Support Exporting Data to Financial Apps" first appeared on MacRumors.com

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Apple Card Offers Benefits From Mastercard, Base APR Lowered to 12.99%

Apple Card, Apple’s credit card that began rolling out to some beta testers and members of the media this week, uses Mastercard for processing payments.

Since it uses Mastercard’s network, the Apple Card is able to take advantage of benefits offered to Mastercard card holders, as pointed out by TechCrunch‘s Matthew Panzarino, one of the early testers.


Mastercard’s website offers a list of benefits available to Apple Card users, including fraud protection, identity theft protection, and a free ShopRunner membership that offers free two-day shipping from some websites.

Other benefits include Mastercard’s travel discounts and upgrades, Mastercard’s exclusive “special events,” Mastercard golf offerings, and home rental discounts via Onefinestay, all of which are available to all Mastercard users.

Purchase protection and extended warranties offered by some credit cards as benefits are not available with the Apple Card. Apple Card’s main benefit is its Daily Cash program, which offers between 1 and 3 percent cash back on purchases, with money sent out each day shortly after a purchase is made.

Also of interest to potential Apple Card customers is a new base annual percentage rate (APR). When Apple Card was announced, Apple said that it would offer an APR between 13.24 percent and 24.24 percent based on credit score. Following the Federal Reserve’s decision to cut interest rates last Wednesday, the APR for Apple card has changed.

As noted by The Verge‘s Nilay Patel, the base APR for purchases is now 12.99%, while the maximum APR is 23.99%.

Btw, the lowest APR for Apple Card is 12.99 percent after Fed rate cut, seeing a few stories quoting a higher rate. But I just signed up and it is indeed 12.99. pic.twitter.com/mYbDpXskUw

— nilay patel (@reckless) August 6, 2019

For those who are applying to Apple Card and who may have frozen their credit, Goldman Sachs handles card approvals and uses TransUnion for credit checks. You’ll need to unfreeze your TransUnion credit to be approved for Apple Card.

Apple Card customers should be aware that the Apple Card must be managed using an iPhone or iPad as there is no web component to the card.


A random selection of people who signed up to be notified about Apple Card are being invited to sign up for the Apple Card today, with a full rollout coming later this month. For more on how Apple Card works, make sure to check out our Apple Card guide.

This article, “Apple Card Offers Benefits From Mastercard, Base APR Lowered to 12.99%” first appeared on MacRumors.com

Discuss this article in our forums

Apple Card, Apple's credit card that began rolling out to some beta testers and members of the media this week, uses Mastercard for processing payments.

Since it uses Mastercard's network, the Apple Card is able to take advantage of benefits offered to Mastercard card holders, as pointed out by TechCrunch's Matthew Panzarino, one of the early testers.


Mastercard's website offers a list of benefits available to Apple Card users, including fraud protection, identity theft protection, and a free ShopRunner membership that offers free two-day shipping from some websites.

Other benefits include Mastercard's travel discounts and upgrades, Mastercard's exclusive "special events," Mastercard golf offerings, and home rental discounts via Onefinestay, all of which are available to all Mastercard users.

Purchase protection and extended warranties offered by some credit cards as benefits are not available with the Apple Card. Apple Card's main benefit is its Daily Cash program, which offers between 1 and 3 percent cash back on purchases, with money sent out each day shortly after a purchase is made.

Also of interest to potential Apple Card customers is a new base annual percentage rate (APR). When Apple Card was announced, Apple said that it would offer an APR between 13.24 percent and 24.24 percent based on credit score. Following the Federal Reserve's decision to cut interest rates last Wednesday, the APR for Apple card has changed.

As noted by The Verge's Nilay Patel, the base APR for purchases is now 12.99%, while the maximum APR is 23.99%.


For those who are applying to Apple Card and who may have frozen their credit, Goldman Sachs handles card approvals and uses TransUnion for credit checks. You'll need to unfreeze your TransUnion credit to be approved for Apple Card.

Apple Card customers should be aware that the Apple Card must be managed using an iPhone or iPad as there is no web component to the card.


A random selection of people who signed up to be notified about Apple Card are being invited to sign up for the Apple Card today, with a full rollout coming later this month. For more on how Apple Card works, make sure to check out our Apple Card guide.


This article, "Apple Card Offers Benefits From Mastercard, Base APR Lowered to 12.99%" first appeared on MacRumors.com

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Apple Shares Series of Videos Explaining How to Use Apple Card

As part of Apple Card‘s “preview rollout” today, Apple has posted a series of videos to its YouTube channel explaining how to set up and use Apple Card on iPhone.


The 10 videos cover a range of topics, including the following:

The Apple Card Preview began today, with a limited number of customers who signed up to be notified about the release of Apple Card now able to apply for the card in their Wallet app and to order a physical Apple Card.

Customers who receive an email invitation to the Apple Card Preview can sign up for Apple Card in the Wallet app on the iPhone or by going to Settings > Wallet & Apple Pay on the iPad.

Apple hasn’t disclosed exactly how many people are part of its “preview rollout,” but a full rollout of Apple Card is expected later this month.

Applicants must be U.S. citizens or lawful residents of the United States and must be 18 years of age or older. An iPhone running iOS 12.4 or later is required to sign up for Apple Card.

Ahead of the official public launch of the Apple Card, Apple’s wallet.apple.com website is active, providing further details on the application process.

In addition, Goldman Sachs last week made its Customer Agreement available providing more detail on the Apple Card, and for questions about how everything will work, make sure to check out our Apple Card guide.

This article, “Apple Shares Series of Videos Explaining How to Use Apple Card” first appeared on MacRumors.com

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As part of Apple Card's "preview rollout" today, Apple has posted a series of videos to its YouTube channel explaining how to set up and use Apple Card on iPhone.


The 10 videos cover a range of topics, including the following:

The Apple Card Preview began today, with a limited number of customers who signed up to be notified about the release of Apple Card now able to apply for the card in their Wallet app and to order a physical Apple Card.

Customers who receive an email invitation to the Apple Card Preview can sign up for Apple Card in the Wallet app on the iPhone or by going to Settings > Wallet & Apple Pay on the iPad.


Apple hasn't disclosed exactly how many people are part of its "preview rollout," but a full rollout of Apple Card is expected later this month.

Applicants must be U.S. citizens or lawful residents of the United States and must be 18 years of age or older. An iPhone running iOS 12.4 or later is required to sign up for Apple Card.

Ahead of the official public launch of the Apple Card, Apple's wallet.apple.com website is active, providing further details on the application process.

In addition, Goldman Sachs last week made its Customer Agreement available providing more detail on the Apple Card, and for questions about how everything will work, make sure to check out our Apple Card guide.


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Apple Card Rolling Out Today to Limited Number of Customers

Apple Card appears to be getting its first group of public test users today. A limited number of customers who signed up on Apple’s website to be notified about the release of Apple Card are reportedly able to apply for the card in their Wallet app and to order a physical Apple Card (via TechCrunch).


Sign-up invites are going out to a random selection of people who signed up to be notified about Apple Card. Apple hasn’t disclosed exactly how many people are part of its “preview rollout,” but a full rollout of Apple Card is expected later this month.

The signup process asks for your address, birthday, income level, and the last four digits of your Social Security number. This information is sent to Goldman Sachs, which approves or declines the application in less than a minute. Once the card is approved it shows up immediately in the Wallet app.

TechCrunch‘s Matthew Panzarino, who has been using Apple Card for a few days, called the card’s app interface “multiples better to use than most card apps,” thanks to spending categories and clear transaction names (including logos in some cases).

The card on the screen has a clever mechanism that gives you a sort of live heat map of your spending categories. The color of the card will shift and blend according to the kinds of things you buy. Spend a lot at restaurants and the card will take on an orange hue. Shop for entertainment related items and the card shifts into a mix of orange and pink. It’s a clever take on the chart based spending category features many other credit cards have built into their websites.

The Verge‘s Nilay Patel also received a physical titanium card early and had this to say about it.

“I got to hold the card itself and it is very nice, although it is fairly thick and felt a little bit heavier than the typical metal credit card. You can use the card without your phone nearby like any other card, but it doesn’t support contactless payments — Apple obviously wants you to use your phone or watch for that.”

Apple Card is limited to the United States at the current time, but may expand to additional countries in the near future. Apple is already in talks with European regulators, and has trademarked Apple Card in Europe, Hong Kong, and Canada.

Apple Card is a no fee credit card. There are no annual fees, international fees, fees for making a late payment, or fees for exceeding your credit limit, which means there are no penalty rates for missing a payment.

Apple CEO Tim Cook said last Tuesday that the Apple Card will launch in August, so the full rollout could be coming any day now. Goldman Sachs last week made its Customer Agreement available providing more detail on the Apple Card, and for questions about how everything will work, make sure to check out our Apple Card guide.

This article, “Apple Card Rolling Out Today to Limited Number of Customers” first appeared on MacRumors.com

Discuss this article in our forums

Apple Card appears to be getting its first group of public test users today. A limited number of customers who signed up on Apple's website to be notified about the release of Apple Card are reportedly able to apply for the card in their Wallet app and to order a physical Apple Card (via TechCrunch).


Sign-up invites are going out to a random selection of people who signed up to be notified about Apple Card. Apple hasn't disclosed exactly how many people are part of its "preview rollout," but a full rollout of Apple Card is expected later this month.

The signup process asks for your address, birthday, income level, and the last four digits of your Social Security number. This information is sent to Goldman Sachs, which approves or declines the application in less than a minute. Once the card is approved it shows up immediately in the Wallet app.

TechCrunch's Matthew Panzarino, who has been using Apple Card for a few days, called the card's app interface "multiples better to use than most card apps," thanks to spending categories and clear transaction names (including logos in some cases).
The card on the screen has a clever mechanism that gives you a sort of live heat map of your spending categories. The color of the card will shift and blend according to the kinds of things you buy. Spend a lot at restaurants and the card will take on an orange hue. Shop for entertainment related items and the card shifts into a mix of orange and pink. It’s a clever take on the chart based spending category features many other credit cards have built into their websites.
The Verge's Nilay Patel also received a physical titanium card early and had this to say about it.
"I got to hold the card itself and it is very nice, although it is fairly thick and felt a little bit heavier than the typical metal credit card. You can use the card without your phone nearby like any other card, but it doesn’t support contactless payments — Apple obviously wants you to use your phone or watch for that."
Apple Card is limited to the United States at the current time, but may expand to additional countries in the near future. Apple is already in talks with European regulators, and has trademarked Apple Card in Europe, Hong Kong, and Canada.

Apple Card is a no fee credit card. There are no annual fees, international fees, fees for making a late payment, or fees for exceeding your credit limit, which means there are no penalty rates for missing a payment.

Apple CEO Tim Cook said last Tuesday that the Apple Card will launch in August, so the full rollout could be coming any day now. Goldman Sachs last week made its Customer Agreement available providing more detail on the Apple Card, and for questions about how everything will work, make sure to check out our Apple Card guide.


This article, "Apple Card Rolling Out Today to Limited Number of Customers" first appeared on MacRumors.com

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Apple Card Coming Soon as Apple Activates Webpages and Launches Preview for Some Users

Ahead of the upcoming launch of the Apple Card, Apple’s wallet.apple.com website is active, providing details on the application process. The site also suggests Apple has sent out email invitations for an “Apple Card Preview” to some customers.

Customers who have received an email invitation to the Apple Card Preview can sign up for Apple Card in the Wallet app on the iPhone or by going to Settings > Wallet & Apple Pay on the iPad. Apple’s wallet site has a tutorial video on the activation steps.


Within the Wallet app, Apple Pay can be accessed by tapping on the “+” button to add a new card and selecting the “Apple Card” entry. Applicants will be asked to fill in personal information before receiving details on their Apple Card with credit limit and APR if approved.

Customers who choose to activate Apple Pay will be able to use it immediately after it is added to the Wallet app, and a physical card will come within a few days.

Applicants must be U.S. citizens or lawful residents of the United States and must be 18 years of age or older. The most recent version of iOS is required, as is an iPhone that can use Apple Pay.

It’s not clear how many customers are receiving emails to test out the Apple Card ahead of its launch, but it should be made available for everyone within the next couple of weeks.

Apple CEO Tim Cook said last Tuesday that the Apple Card will launch in August, so it could be coming any day now. Goldman Sachs last week made its Customer Agreement available providing more detail on the Apple Card, and for questions about how everything will work, make sure to check out our Apple Card guide.

This article, “Apple Card Coming Soon as Apple Activates Webpages and Launches Preview for Some Users” first appeared on MacRumors.com

Discuss this article in our forums

Ahead of the upcoming launch of the Apple Card, Apple's wallet.apple.com website is active, providing details on the application process. The site also suggests Apple has sent out email invitations for an "Apple Card Preview" to some customers.

Customers who have received an email invitation to the Apple Card Preview can sign up for Apple Card in the Wallet app on the iPhone or by going to Settings > Wallet & Apple Pay on the iPad. Apple's wallet site has a tutorial video on the activation steps.


Within the Wallet app, Apple Pay can be accessed by tapping on the "+" button to add a new card and selecting the "Apple Card" entry. Applicants will be asked to fill in personal information before receiving details on their Apple Card with credit limit and APR if approved.

Customers who choose to activate Apple Pay will be able to use it immediately after it is added to the Wallet app, and a physical card will come within a few days.

Applicants must be U.S. citizens or lawful residents of the United States and must be 18 years of age or older. The most recent version of iOS is required, as is an iPhone that can use Apple Pay.

It's not clear how many customers are receiving emails to test out the Apple Card ahead of its launch, but it should be made available for everyone within the next couple of weeks.

Apple CEO Tim Cook said last Tuesday that the Apple Card will launch in August, so it could be coming any day now. Goldman Sachs last week made its Customer Agreement available providing more detail on the Apple Card, and for questions about how everything will work, make sure to check out our Apple Card guide.


This article, "Apple Card Coming Soon as Apple Activates Webpages and Launches Preview for Some Users" first appeared on MacRumors.com

Discuss this article in our forums

Goldman Sachs Makes Apple Card Customer Agreement Available Ahead of Upcoming Apple Card Launch

Ahead of the launch of the Apple Card, the customer agreement for the card has been found on the Goldman Sachs website [PDF], offering up a look at the ins and outs of how it will work.

Most of the details included in customer agreement have already been shared or leaked in previous reports, but this puts all of the information in one easy to access spot.


The agreement goes over eligibility (an Apple ID and two-factor authentication are required), how accounts may be used (no illegal activity), credit limit details, eligible devices, returns, payment info, fees (there are none) and more. Goldman Sachs expressly forbids jailbreaking a device associated with an Apple Card, and says that doing so could result in the closure of the Apple Card account.

If you make unauthorized modifications to your Eligible Device, such as by disabling hardware or software controls (for example, through a process sometimes referred to as “jailbreaking”), your Eligible Device may no longer be eligible to access or manage your Account. You acknowledge that use of a modified Eligible Device in connection with your Account is expressly prohibited, constitutes a violation of this Agreement, and could result in our denying or limiting your access to or closing your Account as well as any other remedies available to us under this Agreement.

It also covers Daily Cash back, the feature that will let customers get a daily payout when making purchases. Goods purchased directly from Apple earn 3%, Apple Pay purchases earn 2%, and all other transactions earn 1%. If a transaction fulfills two categories, such as an Apple Pay purchase in an Apple Store, customers get the highest payout.

Daily Cash is paid out based on the amount of each transaction, multiplied by the appropriate percentage for the transaction type. Daily Cash is rounded up to the nearest cent and provided via the Apple Cash card in the Wallet app. Customers without an Apple Cash card will have Daily Cash accrue that can be applied as a payment credit using the Wallet app.

The document has details on how interest rates are determined, how daily balances are collected, when interest begins to accrue (it works like any standard credit card), how minimum payments are calculated, and when payments should be made to avoid interest (11:59 p.m. ET on the last calendar day of the month).

Your Account automatically has a “Grace Period on New Transactions” in a month where your New Balance for the prior month is $0 or a credit balance. Your Account will also obtain a Grace Period on New Transactions in a month if your Account has a New Balance for the prior month that is greater than $0 and you pay the New Balance for the prior month on or before its payment due date. In a month in which your Account qualifies for a Grace Period on New Transactions, we will not charge interest during that month on any new Transactions that post to your Account.

Payments can be made via an Apple Cash account or a bank account located in the United States, and Goldman Sachs will not issue cards tied to an account in another person’s name. So, in other words, one card per Apple ID.

For those interested in more specifics on how the Apple Card will work, the customer agreement is worth a look and can be found on the Goldman Sachs website. Our Apple Card guide also has a detailed look at everything you need to know about Apple Card.

Earlier this week, Apple CEO Tim Cook said that the Apple Card would launch in August, so it could become available as soon as next week.

This article, “Goldman Sachs Makes Apple Card Customer Agreement Available Ahead of Upcoming Apple Card Launch” first appeared on MacRumors.com

Discuss this article in our forums

Ahead of the launch of the Apple Card, the customer agreement for the card has been found on the Goldman Sachs website [PDF], offering up a look at the ins and outs of how it will work.

Most of the details included in customer agreement have already been shared or leaked in previous reports, but this puts all of the information in one easy to access spot.


The agreement goes over eligibility (an Apple ID and two-factor authentication are required), how accounts may be used (no illegal activity), credit limit details, eligible devices, returns, payment info, fees (there are none) and more. Goldman Sachs expressly forbids jailbreaking a device associated with an Apple Card, and says that doing so could result in the closure of the Apple Card account.
If you make unauthorized modifications to your Eligible Device, such as by disabling hardware or software controls (for example, through a process sometimes referred to as "jailbreaking"), your Eligible Device may no longer be eligible to access or manage your Account. You acknowledge that use of a modified Eligible Device in connection with your Account is expressly prohibited, constitutes a violation of this Agreement, and could result in our denying or limiting your access to or closing your Account as well as any other remedies available to us under this Agreement.
It also covers Daily Cash back, the feature that will let customers get a daily payout when making purchases. Goods purchased directly from Apple earn 3%, Apple Pay purchases earn 2%, and all other transactions earn 1%. If a transaction fulfills two categories, such as an Apple Pay purchase in an Apple Store, customers get the highest payout.

Daily Cash is paid out based on the amount of each transaction, multiplied by the appropriate percentage for the transaction type. Daily Cash is rounded up to the nearest cent and provided via the Apple Cash card in the Wallet app. Customers without an Apple Cash card will have Daily Cash accrue that can be applied as a payment credit using the Wallet app.

The document has details on how interest rates are determined, how daily balances are collected, when interest begins to accrue (it works like any standard credit card), how minimum payments are calculated, and when payments should be made to avoid interest (11:59 p.m. ET on the last calendar day of the month).
Your Account automatically has a "Grace Period on New Transactions" in a month where your New Balance for the prior month is $0 or a credit balance. Your Account will also obtain a Grace Period on New Transactions in a month if your Account has a New Balance for the prior month that is greater than $0 and you pay the New Balance for the prior month on or before its payment due date. In a month in which your Account qualifies for a Grace Period on New Transactions, we will not charge interest during that month on any new Transactions that post to your Account.
Payments can be made via an Apple Cash account or a bank account located in the United States, and Goldman Sachs will not issue cards tied to an account in another person's name. So, in other words, one card per Apple ID.

For those interested in more specifics on how the Apple Card will work, the customer agreement is worth a look and can be found on the Goldman Sachs website. Our Apple Card guide also has a detailed look at everything you need to know about Apple Card.

Earlier this week, Apple CEO Tim Cook said that the Apple Card would launch in August, so it could become available as soon as next week.


This article, "Goldman Sachs Makes Apple Card Customer Agreement Available Ahead of Upcoming Apple Card Launch" first appeared on MacRumors.com

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