Heart Analyzer App Gains New HR Metrics and Exportable Monthly Reports

Version 7 of Heart Analyzer was released today, and the popular third-party heart-rate app for iPhone and Apple Watch has gained some additional features for users looking for even deeper insight into their HR data.


In addition to the wealth of graphs, metrics and reports already available, Heart Analyzer can now also produce monthly PDF reports on a user’s heart rate. This exportable metric is inspired by the Apple Watch ECG reports that can be exported in Apple’s Health app.

The app has also got a new Heart Home tab where users can get more personalized metrics. Details such as maximum and minimum heart rates, cardiac exercise levels and VO2Max offer greater detail on HR readings and fitness based on age and biological sex.

In addition, the user interface has been simplified by the introduction of new card interfaces and natural gestures, improving ease of navigation within the app without removing the level of detail (and in some cases adding even more).

The app never transmits any data from the users iPhone, and there are no third party analytics and no ads. Heart Analyzer is a free download for iPhone on the App Store, and users who wish to support development can unlock small options via in-app purchases. [Direct Link]

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Version 7 of Heart Analyzer was released today, and the popular third-party heart-rate app for iPhone and Apple Watch has gained some additional features for users looking for even deeper insight into their HR data.


In addition to the wealth of graphs, metrics and reports already available, Heart Analyzer can now also produce monthly PDF reports on a user's heart rate. This exportable metric is inspired by the Apple Watch ECG reports that can be exported in Apple's Health app.

The app has also got a new Heart Home tab where users can get more personalized metrics. Details such as maximum and minimum heart rates, cardiac exercise levels and VO2Max offer greater detail on HR readings and fitness based on age and biological sex.

In addition, the user interface has been simplified by the introduction of new card interfaces and natural gestures, improving ease of navigation within the app without removing the level of detail (and in some cases adding even more).

The app never transmits any data from the users iPhone, and there are no third party analytics and no ads. Heart Analyzer is a free download for iPhone on the App Store, and users who wish to support development can unlock small options via in-app purchases. [Direct Link]


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Apple Files Lawsuit Against Virtualization Company Corellium for Illegally Replicating iOS and Apple Apps

Apple today filed a lawsuit against Corellium, a mobile device virtualization company that supports iOS. Corellium describes itself as the “first and only platform” that offers iOS, Android, and Linux virtualization on ARM.

In the lawsuit, filed today in the Southern District of Florida, Apple accuses Corellium of copyright infringement for illegally replicating the operating system and applications that run on the iPhone and the iPad.

A virtual iPhone on Corellium’s website used as evidence in Apple’s lawsuit against the company

Corellium’s business is based entirely on commercializing the illegal replication of the copyrighted operating system and applications that run on Apple’s iPhone, iPad, and other Apple devices. The product Corellium offers is a “virtual” version of Apple mobile hardware products, accessible to anyone with a web browser.

Specifically, Corellium serves up what it touts as a perfect digital facsimile of a broad range of Apple’s market-leading devices–recreating with fastidious attention to detail not just the way the operating system and applications appear visually to bona fide purchasers, but also the underlying computer code. Corellium does so with no license or permission from Apple.

According to Apple, Corellium’s iOS virtualization product infringes on Apple’s copyrights. “Corellium has simply copied everything: the code, the graphical user interface, the icons — all of it, in exacting detail,” reads the lawsuit.

Corellium’s product creates digital replicas of iOS, iTunes, and user interface elements available on a web-based platform or a custom platform built by Corellium. It is designed to create virtual iOS devices for the purpose of running iOS, and at the recent Black Hat USA conference, Corellium emphasized that its “Apple product” is an exact copy of iOS, able to allow researchers and hackers to find and test vulnerabilities.

Apple goes on to say that though Corellium poses its product as a research tool for those aiming to discover security vulnerabilities, the company’s actual goal is “profiting off its blatant infringement” by encouraging users to sell discovered information on the open market to the highest bidder.

Apple says it does not want to encumber “good-faith security research” but instead is aiming to end Corellium’s “unlawful commercialization of Apple’s valuable copyrighted works.”

On information and belief, Corellium makes no effort whatsoever to confine use of its product to good-faith research and testing of iOS. Nor does Corellium require its users to disclose any software bugs they find to Apple, so that Apple may correct them. Instead, Corellium is selling a product for profit, using unauthorized copies of Apple’s proprietary software, that it avowedly intends to be used for any purpose, without limitation, including for the sale of software exploits on the open market.

Apple is seeking a permanent injunction to prevent Corellium from continuing to offer a product that replicates iOS. Apple also wants Corellium to destroy all infringing materials that it’s collected, and pay Apple damages, lost profits, and attorney fees.

Apple Inc. vs. Corellium, LLC by MacRumors on Scribd

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Apple today filed a lawsuit against Corellium, a mobile device virtualization company that supports iOS. Corellium describes itself as the "first and only platform" that offers iOS, Android, and Linux virtualization on ARM.

In the lawsuit, filed today in the Southern District of Florida, Apple accuses Corellium of copyright infringement for illegally replicating the operating system and applications that run on the iPhone and the iPad.

A virtual iPhone on Corellium's website used as evidence in Apple's lawsuit against the company
Corellium's business is based entirely on commercializing the illegal replication of the copyrighted operating system and applications that run on Apple's iPhone, iPad, and other Apple devices. The product Corellium offers is a "virtual" version of Apple mobile hardware products, accessible to anyone with a web browser.

Specifically, Corellium serves up what it touts as a perfect digital facsimile of a broad range of Apple's market-leading devices--recreating with fastidious attention to detail not just the way the operating system and applications appear visually to bona fide purchasers, but also the underlying computer code. Corellium does so with no license or permission from Apple.
According to Apple, Corellium's iOS virtualization product infringes on Apple's copyrights. "Corellium has simply copied everything: the code, the graphical user interface, the icons -- all of it, in exacting detail," reads the lawsuit.

Corellium's product creates digital replicas of iOS, iTunes, and user interface elements available on a web-based platform or a custom platform built by Corellium. It is designed to create virtual iOS devices for the purpose of running iOS, and at the recent Black Hat USA conference, Corellium emphasized that its "Apple product" is an exact copy of iOS, able to allow researchers and hackers to find and test vulnerabilities.

Apple goes on to say that though Corellium poses its product as a research tool for those aiming to discover security vulnerabilities, the company's actual goal is "profiting off its blatant infringement" by encouraging users to sell discovered information on the open market to the highest bidder.

Apple says it does not want to encumber "good-faith security research" but instead is aiming to end Corellium's "unlawful commercialization of Apple's valuable copyrighted works."
On information and belief, Corellium makes no effort whatsoever to confine use of its product to good-faith research and testing of iOS. Nor does Corellium require its users to disclose any software bugs they find to Apple, so that Apple may correct them. Instead, Corellium is selling a product for profit, using unauthorized copies of Apple's proprietary software, that it avowedly intends to be used for any purpose, without limitation, including for the sale of software exploits on the open market.
Apple is seeking a permanent injunction to prevent Corellium from continuing to offer a product that replicates iOS. Apple also wants Corellium to destroy all infringing materials that it's collected, and pay Apple damages, lost profits, and attorney fees.

Apple Inc. vs. Corellium, LLC by MacRumors on Scribd





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Apple Touts U.S. Impact of 2.4 Million Jobs

Apple is directly or indirectly responsible for creating a total of 2.4 million jobs in the United States, the company announced today.

Apple says that this is four times the number of American jobs that were attributable to the company compared to eight years ago, and that it is on pace to directly contribute $350 billion to the U.S. economy as announced last year.


That 2.4 million figure includes Apple’s own employees and those at U.S. companies that create components for Apple devices or otherwise work at Apple, such as battery testing company Maccor and modem company Broadcom, which has a manufacturing facility in Colorado.

Apple also works with Texas company Finisar, and since getting $390 million as part of Apple’s Advanced Manufacturing Fund, Finisar is on track to fill 500 full-time positions. Finisar will soon begin shipping the VCSELs used to power Face ID. According to Apple, it spent a collective $60 billion across 9,000 American companies in 2018.

The App Store, says Apple, is responsible for 1.9 million American jobs, up by 325,000 over the course of the last 2.5 years.

Several states saw double-digit growth during that period, including a 43 percent increase in North Carolina, representing almost 15,000 new jobs, and a 50 percent increase in Florida, which added almost 30,000 new jobs. Pennsylvania saw a 64 percent increase in growth, going from 40,800 jobs in 2016 to more than 67,000 today.

Apple itself currently employs 90,000 employees across 50 states and is on track to create 20,000 new jobs across the U.S. by 2023 with new campuses in Seattle and San Diego.

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Apple is directly or indirectly responsible for creating a total of 2.4 million jobs in the United States, the company announced today.

Apple says that this is four times the number of American jobs that were attributable to the company compared to eight years ago, and that it is on pace to directly contribute $350 billion to the U.S. economy as announced last year.


That 2.4 million figure includes Apple's own employees and those at U.S. companies that create components for Apple devices or otherwise work at Apple, such as battery testing company Maccor and modem company Broadcom, which has a manufacturing facility in Colorado.

Apple also works with Texas company Finisar, and since getting $390 million as part of Apple's Advanced Manufacturing Fund, Finisar is on track to fill 500 full-time positions. Finisar will soon begin shipping the VCSELs used to power Face ID. According to Apple, it spent a collective $60 billion across 9,000 American companies in 2018.

The App Store, says Apple, is responsible for 1.9 million American jobs, up by 325,000 over the course of the last 2.5 years.
Several states saw double-digit growth during that period, including a 43 percent increase in North Carolina, representing almost 15,000 new jobs, and a 50 percent increase in Florida, which added almost 30,000 new jobs. Pennsylvania saw a 64 percent increase in growth, going from 40,800 jobs in 2016 to more than 67,000 today.
Apple itself currently employs 90,000 employees across 50 states and is on track to create 20,000 new jobs across the U.S. by 2023 with new campuses in Seattle and San Diego.


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Useful Accessories for Your Mac

Apple has refreshed several of its Macs in 2019, including the MacBook Air, the MacBook Pro, and the iMac, so we thought it would be a good time to round up some useful Mac accessories.

In our latest YouTube video, MacRumors videographer Dan Barbera goes over some of his favorite products that he uses with his own Mac.

Subscribe to the MacRumors YouTube channel for more videos.

  • Incase Textured Hardshell Case in Woolenex ($69) – Incase, a well-known Apple accessory maker, has a range of different cases for Mac notebooks, protecting them from drops, scratches, and other minor damage. The Textured Hardshell Case in Woolenex is an Apple Store exclusive designed for Apple’s USB-C notebooks. It’s a hard shell with a polyester-based fabric coating that feels like cotton and repels moisture. It features ventilation options and is fitted to your MacBook so it doesn’t add a lot of bulk.
  • Mophie Powerstation USB-C XXL ($150) – Mophie’s power banks are well-designed and reliable, and this model offers up 19,500mAh and comes equipped with a 30W USB-C port so you can use it to charge a Mac notebook or an iPad Pro. It’s not going to charge a MacBook Pro at full speed, but it has enough power to add some extra battery life. On the downside, Mophie is super expensive, and there are other alternatives on the market, including many that we’ve tested.
  • Anker PowerPort II ($30) – Anker makes a whole range of excellent power adapters that can be used in lieu of your standard Apple chargers, including the PowerPort II. The PowerPort II features a 30W USB-C port and a 19.5W USB-A port for charging both USB-C and USB-A devices. It’s not going to charge a MacBook Pro at maximum speed because it’s only 30W, but it still works when time isn’t an issue and it’s a good way to avoid having to carry multiple power adapters when you travel. Anker has higher-powered power adapters too, which are also worth checking out. Apple sells this same PowerPort II for $60 with a USB-C cable, but it’s a better deal to buy it standalone.
  • OWC USB-C Travel Dock ($55) – OWC’s USB-C Travel Dock is designed to add additional ports to your Mac notebook. It comes equipped with a built-in USB-C cable so it’s ideal for travel, and it has a 4K HDMI port, an SD card reader, two USB 3.1 Type-A ports, and a USB-C passthrough port that supports up to 100W of power for charging even the 15-inch MacBook Pro at full speed.
  • Satechi Monitor Stand ($90) – If you have an iMac, check out Satechi’s line of monitor stands, which are designed to add additional front ports and lift your iMac up to eye level. The built-in USB-C hub in the stand features an SD and micro SD card slot, a 3.5mm headphone jack, 3 USB Type-A ports, and a USB-C ports.

Know of other favorite Mac accessories that we didn’t mention here? Feel free to share them in the comments.

Note: MacRumors is an affiliate partner with some of these vendors. When you click a link and make a purchase, we may receive a small payment, which helps us keep the site running.

This article, “Useful Accessories for Your Mac” first appeared on MacRumors.com

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Apple has refreshed several of its Macs in 2019, including the MacBook Air, the MacBook Pro, and the iMac, so we thought it would be a good time to round up some useful Mac accessories.

In our latest YouTube video, MacRumors videographer Dan Barbera goes over some of his favorite products that he uses with his own Mac.

Subscribe to the MacRumors YouTube channel for more videos.

  • Incase Textured Hardshell Case in Woolenex ($69) - Incase, a well-known Apple accessory maker, has a range of different cases for Mac notebooks, protecting them from drops, scratches, and other minor damage. The Textured Hardshell Case in Woolenex is an Apple Store exclusive designed for Apple's USB-C notebooks. It's a hard shell with a polyester-based fabric coating that feels like cotton and repels moisture. It features ventilation options and is fitted to your MacBook so it doesn't add a lot of bulk.


  • Mophie Powerstation USB-C XXL ($150) - Mophie's power banks are well-designed and reliable, and this model offers up 19,500mAh and comes equipped with a 30W USB-C port so you can use it to charge a Mac notebook or an iPad Pro. It's not going to charge a MacBook Pro at full speed, but it has enough power to add some extra battery life. On the downside, Mophie is super expensive, and there are other alternatives on the market, including many that we've tested.


  • Anker PowerPort II ($30) - Anker makes a whole range of excellent power adapters that can be used in lieu of your standard Apple chargers, including the PowerPort II. The PowerPort II features a 30W USB-C port and a 19.5W USB-A port for charging both USB-C and USB-A devices. It's not going to charge a MacBook Pro at maximum speed because it's only 30W, but it still works when time isn't an issue and it's a good way to avoid having to carry multiple power adapters when you travel. Anker has higher-powered power adapters too, which are also worth checking out. Apple sells this same PowerPort II for $60 with a USB-C cable, but it's a better deal to buy it standalone.


  • OWC USB-C Travel Dock ($55) - OWC's USB-C Travel Dock is designed to add additional ports to your Mac notebook. It comes equipped with a built-in USB-C cable so it's ideal for travel, and it has a 4K HDMI port, an SD card reader, two USB 3.1 Type-A ports, and a USB-C passthrough port that supports up to 100W of power for charging even the 15-inch MacBook Pro at full speed.


  • Satechi Monitor Stand ($90) - If you have an iMac, check out Satechi's line of monitor stands, which are designed to add additional front ports and lift your iMac up to eye level. The built-in USB-C hub in the stand features an SD and micro SD card slot, a 3.5mm headphone jack, 3 USB Type-A ports, and a USB-C ports.

Know of other favorite Mac accessories that we didn't mention here? Feel free to share them in the comments.

Note: MacRumors is an affiliate partner with some of these vendors. When you click a link and make a purchase, we may receive a small payment, which helps us keep the site running.


This article, "Useful Accessories for Your Mac" first appeared on MacRumors.com

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Recalled 2015 15-Inch MacBook Pro Models With Faulty Batteries Banned From Flights in U.S.

Following a recall initiated by Apple, the Federal Aviation Administration has banned mid-2015 15-inch MacBook Pro models with faulty batteries from flights, reports Bloomberg.

Apple in June announced a voluntary recall and replacement program for 15-inch MacBook Pro models sold between September 2015 and February 2017 as these models may contain batteries that can overheat and pose a fire safety risk.


In a statement to Bloomberg, the Federal Aviation Administration said that major U.S. airlines have been notified about the recall and have been instructed to follow guidelines for goods with recalled batteries.

That means affected Apple laptops that have not received replacement batteries are not allowed on flights as cargo or in carry-on luggage, which is standard operating procedure.

Earlier this month, the European Union Aviation Safety Agency also warned European airlines to make sure affected MacBook Pro models are switched off and not used during flights.

Four cargo airlines, including TUI Group Airlines, Thomas Cook Airlines, Air Italy, and Air Transat have implemented bans that prevent the laptops from being brought on planes as cargo.

“Please note that the 15-inch Apple MacBook Pro laptop, sold between mid-2015 to February-2017 is prohibited on board any of our mandate carriers,” a TCE operations coordinator wrote to employees.

TUI Group Airlines, based out of the UK, plans to begin making announcements about affected MacBook Pro models at the gate and prior to takeoff, but laptops with replaced batteries will not be affected. There is no word on whether similar announcements will be made at U.S. airports and other airports worldwide.

Apple has asked customers with a 15-inch mid-2015 MacBook Pro to stop using their machines until they can take the steps to have their batteries replaced. Users with a 2015 MacBook Pro can enter their Mac’s serial number in the recall program website to check if their machine needs a replacement battery.

Apple has been offering free replacement batteries since June and has sent out emails to customers who are affected urging them to bring their MacBook Pro models in for repair. 2015 machines that have a fresh battery are allowed on planes as normal.

15-inch MacBook Pro models from 2015 that have faulty batteries are in danger of overheating and catching on fire. Approximately 432,000 potentially affected MacBook Pro units were sold in the United States, along with 26,000 in Canada.

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Following a recall initiated by Apple, the Federal Aviation Administration has banned mid-2015 15-inch MacBook Pro models with faulty batteries from flights, reports Bloomberg.

Apple in June announced a voluntary recall and replacement program for 15-inch MacBook Pro models sold between September 2015 and February 2017 as these models may contain batteries that can overheat and pose a fire safety risk.


In a statement to Bloomberg, the Federal Aviation Administration said that major U.S. airlines have been notified about the recall and have been instructed to follow guidelines for goods with recalled batteries.

That means affected Apple laptops that have not received replacement batteries are not allowed on flights as cargo or in carry-on luggage, which is standard operating procedure.

Earlier this month, the European Union Aviation Safety Agency also warned European airlines to make sure affected MacBook Pro models are switched off and not used during flights.

Four cargo airlines, including TUI Group Airlines, Thomas Cook Airlines, Air Italy, and Air Transat have implemented bans that prevent the laptops from being brought on planes as cargo.
"Please note that the 15-inch Apple MacBook Pro laptop, sold between mid-2015 to February-2017 is prohibited on board any of our mandate carriers," a TCE operations coordinator wrote to employees.
TUI Group Airlines, based out of the UK, plans to begin making announcements about affected MacBook Pro models at the gate and prior to takeoff, but laptops with replaced batteries will not be affected. There is no word on whether similar announcements will be made at U.S. airports and other airports worldwide.

Apple has asked customers with a 15-inch mid-2015 MacBook Pro to stop using their machines until they can take the steps to have their batteries replaced. Users with a 2015 MacBook Pro can enter their Mac's serial number in the recall program website to check if their machine needs a replacement battery.

Apple has been offering free replacement batteries since June and has sent out emails to customers who are affected urging them to bring their MacBook Pro models in for repair. 2015 machines that have a fresh battery are allowed on planes as normal.

15-inch MacBook Pro models from 2015 that have faulty batteries are in danger of overheating and catching on fire. Approximately 432,000 potentially affected MacBook Pro units were sold in the United States, along with 26,000 in Canada.


This article, "Recalled 2015 15-Inch MacBook Pro Models With Faulty Batteries Banned From Flights in U.S." first appeared on MacRumors.com

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OWC Launches New USB-C Travel Dock With Built-In Cable and Support for 100W Pass-Through Power

OWC today announced the launch of an updated version of its compact, square-shaped Travel Dock, adding new capabilities and design changes.

The new version of the dock features built-in cable storage at the bottom of the accessory, so you can make sure you always have a USB-C to USB-C cable with you when you need it while on the go.


It also supports up to 100W of pass-through power for the first time, up from the 60W supported in the previous version. That means it has enough power for all of Apple’s MacBook models, including the 85W 15-inch MacBook Pro.

The OWC USB-C Travel Dock continues to offer a 4K HDMI port, an SD Card reader, two USB 3.1 Type-A ports, and the aforementioned USB-C power pass-through port.


OWC says the dock is compatible with Mac, Windows, Linux, iOS, Android, Windows, and Chrome notebooks and tablets, and for Mac users, it will work with Mac devices and the USB-C iPad Pro.

The OWC USB-C Travel Dock is available from the OWC website for $54.99.

Note: MacRumors is an affiliate partner with OWC. When you click a link and make a purchase, we may receive a small payment, which helps us keep the site running.

This article, “OWC Launches New USB-C Travel Dock With Built-In Cable and Support for 100W Pass-Through Power” first appeared on MacRumors.com

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OWC today announced the launch of an updated version of its compact, square-shaped Travel Dock, adding new capabilities and design changes.

The new version of the dock features built-in cable storage at the bottom of the accessory, so you can make sure you always have a USB-C to USB-C cable with you when you need it while on the go.


It also supports up to 100W of pass-through power for the first time, up from the 60W supported in the previous version. That means it has enough power for all of Apple's MacBook models, including the 85W 15-inch MacBook Pro.

The OWC USB-C Travel Dock continues to offer a 4K HDMI port, an SD Card reader, two USB 3.1 Type-A ports, and the aforementioned USB-C power pass-through port.


OWC says the dock is compatible with Mac, Windows, Linux, iOS, Android, Windows, and Chrome notebooks and tablets, and for Mac users, it will work with Mac devices and the USB-C iPad Pro.

The OWC USB-C Travel Dock is available from the OWC website for $54.99.

Note: MacRumors is an affiliate partner with OWC. When you click a link and make a purchase, we may receive a small payment, which helps us keep the site running.


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Security Researcher Develops Lightning Cable That Gives Hackers a Way to Remotely Infiltrate Your Computer

A security researcher named MG has developed a Lightning cable replacement that can give hackers a way to remotely access your computer, reports Motherboard.

The cables in question (dubbed O.MG Cables) are cables directly from Apple that have been opened up to allow for additional components to be implanted, but the modifications are undetectable and there’s no way to distinguish the hacked cable from the original.

Image via Motherboard

When plugged into a target computer, the cable behaves as a typical cable does, connecting to and charging iOS devices, but it also lets hackers remotely connect to a machine to run commands. It comes equipped with scripts and commands that a hacker can run on a victim’s machine, along with tools to “kill” the USB implant to hide evidence of its existence.

MG typed in the IP address of the fake cable on his own phone’s browser, and was presented with a list of options, such as opening a terminal on my Mac. From here, a hacker can run all sorts of tools on the victim’s computer.

“It’s like being able to sit at the keyboard and mouse of the victim but without actually being there,” MG said.

In a test with Motherboard, MG was able to connect his phone to a WiFi hotspot that the cable was emitting. He said he needed to be within 300 feet to access the target machine, but also said that the cable can be configured to act as a client for a nearby wireless network, potentially allowing for hacking from an unlimited distance.

“I’m currently seeing up to 300 feet with a smartphone when connecting directly,” he said, when asked how close an attacker needs to be to take advantage of the cable once a victim has plugged it into their machine. A hacker could use a stronger antenna to reach further if necessary, “But the cable can be configured to act as a client to a nearby wireless network. And if that wireless network has an internet connection, the distance basically becomes unlimited.”

MG imagines the cable could be swapped in for a target’s legitimate cable or gifted to someone because it looks exactly like an Apple cable, complete with accurate packaging. Each of these cables were made by hand and are being sold by MG for $200, but he is teaming up with a company to produce them as a legitimate security tool.

It’s not clear if there is any defense against this kind of hack, but it sounds like these cables are prohibitively expensive and limited in availability at the current time. Those concerned should buy cables directly from Apple without accepting free cables from anyone. Apple may also be developing a mitigation and has previously restricted other USB access techniques through USB Restricted Mode.

This article, “Security Researcher Develops Lightning Cable That Gives Hackers a Way to Remotely Infiltrate Your Computer” first appeared on MacRumors.com

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A security researcher named MG has developed a Lightning cable replacement that can give hackers a way to remotely access your computer, reports Motherboard.

The cables in question (dubbed O.MG Cables) are cables directly from Apple that have been opened up to allow for additional components to be implanted, but the modifications are undetectable and there's no way to distinguish the hacked cable from the original.

Image via Motherboard

When plugged into a target computer, the cable behaves as a typical cable does, connecting to and charging iOS devices, but it also lets hackers remotely connect to a machine to run commands. It comes equipped with scripts and commands that a hacker can run on a victim's machine, along with tools to "kill" the USB implant to hide evidence of its existence.
MG typed in the IP address of the fake cable on his own phone's browser, and was presented with a list of options, such as opening a terminal on my Mac. From here, a hacker can run all sorts of tools on the victim's computer.

"It's like being able to sit at the keyboard and mouse of the victim but without actually being there," MG said.
In a test with Motherboard, MG was able to connect his phone to a WiFi hotspot that the cable was emitting. He said he needed to be within 300 feet to access the target machine, but also said that the cable can be configured to act as a client for a nearby wireless network, potentially allowing for hacking from an unlimited distance.
"I'm currently seeing up to 300 feet with a smartphone when connecting directly," he said, when asked how close an attacker needs to be to take advantage of the cable once a victim has plugged it into their machine. A hacker could use a stronger antenna to reach further if necessary, "But the cable can be configured to act as a client to a nearby wireless network. And if that wireless network has an internet connection, the distance basically becomes unlimited."
MG imagines the cable could be swapped in for a target's legitimate cable or gifted to someone because it looks exactly like an Apple cable, complete with accurate packaging. Each of these cables were made by hand and are being sold by MG for $200, but he is teaming up with a company to produce them as a legitimate security tool.

It's not clear if there is any defense against this kind of hack, but it sounds like these cables are prohibitively expensive and limited in availability at the current time. Those concerned should buy cables directly from Apple without accepting free cables from anyone. Apple may also be developing a mitigation and has previously restricted other USB access techniques through USB Restricted Mode.


This article, "Security Researcher Develops Lightning Cable That Gives Hackers a Way to Remotely Infiltrate Your Computer" first appeared on MacRumors.com

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Apple Releases USB-C Digital AV Multiport Adapter with HDMI 2.0 Support

Apple has begun selling an updated version of its USB-C Digital AV Multiport Adapter, offering HDMI 2.0 support, HDR output, and more.


The new Multiport Adapter lets users connect a USB-C-enabled Mac or iPad Pro to a HDMI display, while also connecting a standard USB device and a USB-C charging cable.

The old version of the adapter only supported HDMI 1.4b, but this new model supports HDMI 2.0 at 60Hz and resolutions up to 3,840 x 2,160 pixels when connected to a 2017 or later 15-inch MacBook Pro, 2017 or later iMac, iMac Pro or iPad Pro. Resolutions of 1080p at 60Hz and 3,840 x 2,160 pixels at 30Hz are also supported.

To connect at these resolutions and refresh rates, Apple says devices need to be running macOS Mojave 10.14.6 or later or iOS 12.4 or later.

Apart from HDMI 2.0, the new dongle includes a USB-A port offering USB3 transfer speeds up to 5Gbps, and a USB-C port that’s capable of transferring power from a wall charger or battery pack. In addition, the adapter brings Dolby Vision and HDR10 support when connected to a compatible playback device and display, TV, or projector.

The updated USB-C Digital AV Multiport Adapter keeps its $69 price tag, and Apple is quoting a delivery arrival time of August 12 or 13 for online orders placed today. Apple retail stores are due to receive stock on August 13.

Apple has published a support document explaining the differences between the new version of its Multiport Adapter (model number A2119) and the old one (A1621).

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Apple has begun selling an updated version of its USB-C Digital AV Multiport Adapter, offering HDMI 2.0 support, HDR output, and more.


The new Multiport Adapter lets users connect a USB-C-enabled Mac or iPad Pro to a HDMI display, while also connecting a standard USB device and a USB-C charging cable.

The old version of the adapter only supported HDMI 1.4b, but this new model supports HDMI 2.0 at 60Hz and resolutions up to 3,840 x 2,160 pixels when connected to a 2017 or later 15-inch MacBook Pro, 2017 or later iMac, iMac Pro or iPad Pro. Resolutions of 1080p at 60Hz and 3,840 x 2,160 pixels at 30Hz are also supported.

To connect at these resolutions and refresh rates, Apple says devices need to be running macOS Mojave 10.14.6 or later or iOS 12.4 or later.

Apart from HDMI 2.0, the new dongle includes a USB-A port offering USB3 transfer speeds up to 5Gbps, and a USB-C port that's capable of transferring power from a wall charger or battery pack. In addition, the adapter brings Dolby Vision and HDR10 support when connected to a compatible playback device and display, TV, or projector.

The updated USB-C Digital AV Multiport Adapter keeps its $69 price tag, and Apple is quoting a delivery arrival time of August 12 or 13 for online orders placed today. Apple retail stores are due to receive stock on August 13.

Apple has published a support document explaining the differences between the new version of its Multiport Adapter (model number A2119) and the old one (A1621).


This article, "Apple Releases USB-C Digital AV Multiport Adapter with HDMI 2.0 Support" first appeared on MacRumors.com

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Apple Music, Apple TV and Apple Books Experiencing Outage

Apple Books, Apple Music, Apple TV, Beats 1, and Radio are experiencing outages at the current time according to Apple’s System Status page. Reports on Twitter also suggest iTunes is experiencing issues.

There have been multiple complaints on Twitter about movies being interrupted mid-play along with issues accessing Apple Music. Apple’s site says the services have been down since 6:11 p.m. Pacific Time.


Apple says that Apple Books users may experience intermittent issues, while Apple Music and Apple TV users are experiencing service problems.

Apple is investigating the issue, though it’s not clear when the services will come back up. Most outages are brief. We’ll update this post when the problem has been resolved.

This article, “Apple Music, Apple TV and Apple Books Experiencing Outage” first appeared on MacRumors.com

Discuss this article in our forums

Apple Books, Apple Music, Apple TV, Beats 1, and Radio are experiencing outages at the current time according to Apple's System Status page. Reports on Twitter also suggest iTunes is experiencing issues.

There have been multiple complaints on Twitter about movies being interrupted mid-play along with issues accessing Apple Music. Apple's site says the services have been down since 6:11 p.m. Pacific Time.


Apple says that Apple Books users may experience intermittent issues, while Apple Music and Apple TV users are experiencing service problems.

Apple is investigating the issue, though it's not clear when the services will come back up. Most outages are brief. We'll update this post when the problem has been resolved.


This article, "Apple Music, Apple TV and Apple Books Experiencing Outage" first appeared on MacRumors.com

Discuss this article in our forums

Apple CEO Tim Cook Meets With Coast Guard Admiral Karl Schultz at Apple Park

Apple CEO Tim took today met with Coast Guard Admiral Karl Schultz, according to a photo that Schultz shared today on Twitter.

Schultz said that he and Cook shared “ideas, perspectives, and experiences” though there was no specific detail on what the two discussed during the meeting.


“Our industries are different, but our purpose is similar – do the best for our people, provide the highest level of service possible, and make a positive impact in the world,” wrote Schultz.

As 9to5Mac points out, Apple has teamed up with the Coast Guard in the past. Following 2017’s Hurricane Harvey, the Coast Guard used helicopters equipped with iPads to coordinate search and rescue teams.

This article, “Apple CEO Tim Cook Meets With Coast Guard Admiral Karl Schultz at Apple Park” first appeared on MacRumors.com

Discuss this article in our forums

Apple CEO Tim took today met with Coast Guard Admiral Karl Schultz, according to a photo that Schultz shared today on Twitter.

Schultz said that he and Cook shared "ideas, perspectives, and experiences" though there was no specific detail on what the two discussed during the meeting.


"Our industries are different, but our purpose is similar - do the best for our people, provide the highest level of service possible, and make a positive impact in the world," wrote Schultz.

As 9to5Mac points out, Apple has teamed up with the Coast Guard in the past. Following 2017's Hurricane Harvey, the Coast Guard used helicopters equipped with iPads to coordinate search and rescue teams.


This article, "Apple CEO Tim Cook Meets With Coast Guard Admiral Karl Schultz at Apple Park" first appeared on MacRumors.com

Discuss this article in our forums