Bloomberg: Apple Loses Two Veteran Operations Executives

Apple has lost two long-serving operations executives, including its VP in charge of manufacturing design and a longtime iPhone operations executive who moved to its AR division, reports Bloomberg‘s Mark Gurman.


Nick Forlenza, a vice president of manufacturing design, has retired from Apple, while Duco Pasmooij, another vice president who worked on operations, is discussing an exit in the near future, according to people familiar with the moves. Pasmooij left the operations team over a year ago, moving into a role reporting to the company’s head of augmented reality efforts, said the people, who asked not to be identified discussing personnel.

According to the report, Forlenza had worked under Sabih Kahn, Apple’s senior VP of operations, as an executive in charge of manufacturing design. Forlenza led a team of supply chain and operations executives responsible for global production processes and manufacturing equipment.

Pasmooij helped lead production operations for the ‌iPhone‌ for many years, but had recently reported to Mike Rockwell, the vice president in charge of augmented reality and virtual reality efforts. The personnel moves aren’t related to each other, nor to the recent supply chain disruptions owing to the coronavirus outbreak, according Gurman’s sources.

Apple has about 100 vice presidents who help CEO Tim Cook and the senior executive team run the company.

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Apple has lost two long-serving operations executives, including its VP in charge of manufacturing design and a longtime iPhone operations executive who moved to its AR division, reports Bloomberg's Mark Gurman.


Nick Forlenza, a vice president of manufacturing design, has retired from Apple, while Duco Pasmooij, another vice president who worked on operations, is discussing an exit in the near future, according to people familiar with the moves. Pasmooij left the operations team over a year ago, moving into a role reporting to the company’s head of augmented reality efforts, said the people, who asked not to be identified discussing personnel.
According to the report, Forlenza had worked under Sabih Kahn, Apple's senior VP of operations, as an executive in charge of manufacturing design. Forlenza led a team of supply chain and operations executives responsible for global production processes and manufacturing equipment.

Pasmooij helped lead production operations for the ‌iPhone‌ for many years, but had recently reported to Mike Rockwell, the vice president in charge of augmented reality and virtual reality efforts. The personnel moves aren't related to each other, nor to the recent supply chain disruptions owing to the coronavirus outbreak, according Gurman's sources.

Apple has about 100 vice presidents who help CEO Tim Cook and the senior executive team run the company.


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Spotify May Be Allowed to Stream Directly on HomePod and Set as Default Music App in iOS 14

Bloomberg‘s Mark Gurman today reported that Apple is working to allow third-party music services like Spotify and Pandora to be streamed directly on the HomePod with Siri in a future software update, as is possible with Apple Music. Spotify currently can only be streamed on the HomePod via AirPlay.


The report adds that Apple is also considering allowing third-party music services to be set as default in iOS 14, which would let users ask Siri to stream music from the likes of Spotify without specifying “with Spotify” at the end of the command. Siri currently defaults to Apple Music for these requests.

In early 2019, Spotify announced that it had filed an antitrust complaint against Apple with the European Commission over unfair ‌App Store‌ practices. At the time, Spotify took issue with Siri’s lack of Spotify support on both iOS devices — which has since changed to a limited extent — and the HomePod.

An excerpt from its “Time to Play Fair” website — the wording has since been tweaked:

Apple ignores users’ preferred choice of music service and instead steers them to use Apple Music exclusively. So can you ask Siri to play your favorite playlist from Spotify? No, not even if you actively want Spotify to be your default streaming service. Or can you listen to Spotify through your Apple HomePod? Sorry, no luck with that either. And by the way, Spotify is available on pretty much every other speaker device out there.

Apple has faced increasing scrutiny as of late over the way it runs its ‌App Store‌, beyond Spotify’s complaint. Allowing third-party apps to be set as default would certainly help alleviate some of those concerns.

More Coverage: Bloomberg: Apple May Let iOS Users Set Third-Party Web Browser and Mail Apps as Defaults Over Stock Apps

Related Roundup: HomePod
Buyer’s Guide: HomePod (Neutral)

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Bloomberg's Mark Gurman today reported that Apple is working to allow third-party music services like Spotify and Pandora to be streamed directly on the HomePod with Siri in a future software update, as is possible with Apple Music. Spotify currently can only be streamed on the HomePod via AirPlay.


The report adds that Apple is also considering allowing third-party music services to be set as default in iOS 14, which would let users ask Siri to stream music from the likes of Spotify without specifying "with Spotify" at the end of the command. Siri currently defaults to Apple Music for these requests.

In early 2019, Spotify announced that it had filed an antitrust complaint against Apple with the European Commission over unfair ‌App Store‌ practices. At the time, Spotify took issue with Siri's lack of Spotify support on both iOS devices — which has since changed to a limited extent — and the HomePod.

An excerpt from its "Time to Play Fair" website — the wording has since been tweaked:
Apple ignores users' preferred choice of music service and instead steers them to use Apple Music exclusively. So can you ask Siri to play your favorite playlist from Spotify? No, not even if you actively want Spotify to be your default streaming service. Or can you listen to Spotify through your Apple HomePod? Sorry, no luck with that either. And by the way, Spotify is available on pretty much every other speaker device out there.
Apple has faced increasing scrutiny as of late over the way it runs its ‌App Store‌, beyond Spotify's complaint. Allowing third-party apps to be set as default would certainly help alleviate some of those concerns.

More Coverage: Bloomberg: Apple May Let iOS Users Set Third-Party Web Browser and Mail Apps as Defaults Over Stock Apps

Related Roundup: HomePod
Buyer's Guide: HomePod (Neutral)

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Bloomberg: Apple May Let iOS Users Set Third-Party Web Browser and Mail Apps as Defaults Over Stock Apps

Apple is considering whether to let iPhone and iPad users set third-party mail and browser apps as defaults instead of the mobile operating system’s preference for its own Safari and Mail stock apps. Bloomberg‘s Mark Gurman:


The technology giant is discussing whether to let users choose third-party web browser and mail applications as their default options on Apple’s mobile devices, replacing the company’s Safari browser and Mail app, according to people familiar with the matter.

The potential move comes after criticism that the tech giant gives its in-house apps an unfair advantage and undue prominence on the App Store. As it stands, Apple doesn’t allow users to replace pre-installed apps like Safari and Mail with third-party services, opening it up to scrutiny from lawmakers investigating possible antitrust violations.

The report also claims that Apple is considering opening its HomePod speaker to third-party music services like Spotify.

The Cupertino, California-based company also is considering loosening restrictions on third-party music apps, including its top streaming rival Spotify Technology SA, on HomePods, said the people, who asked not to be named discussing internal company deliberations.

Currently, Spotify and other third-party music services can be streamed from ‌iPhone‌ or ‌iPad‌ to ‌HomePod‌ using Apple’s AirPlay technology, but it’s an ungainly alternative solution than just allowing users to stream third-party music services from the speaker directly.

As Gurman notes, opening the ‌HomePod‌ to additional music services could benefit the product’s sales. The speaker has lagged behind rivals like the Amazon Echo in functionality since being introduced in 2018 and owns less than 5 percent of the smart-speaker market, according to an estimate last week from Strategy Analytics.

Whether the discussions include opening the ‌HomePod‌’s integrated Bluetooth technology to Bluetooth streaming devices is unknown. Currently, Bluetooth is used during the ‌HomePod‌’s setup process, but is otherwise rendered dormant in the speaker, which means only Apple devices can stream audio to ‌HomePod‌ using the ‌AirPlay‌ protocol.

Related Roundup: HomePod
Buyer’s Guide: HomePod (Neutral)

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Apple is considering whether to let iPhone and iPad users set third-party mail and browser apps as defaults instead of the mobile operating system's preference for its own Safari and Mail stock apps. Bloomberg's Mark Gurman:

The technology giant is discussing whether to let users choose third-party web browser and mail applications as their default options on Apple’s mobile devices, replacing the company’s Safari browser and Mail app, according to people familiar with the matter.
The potential move comes after criticism that the tech giant gives its in-house apps an unfair advantage and undue prominence on the App Store. As it stands, Apple doesn't allow users to replace pre-installed apps like Safari and Mail with third-party services, opening it up to scrutiny from lawmakers investigating possible antitrust violations.

The report also claims that Apple is considering opening its HomePod speaker to third-party music services like Spotify.
The Cupertino, California-based company also is considering loosening restrictions on third-party music apps, including its top streaming rival Spotify Technology SA, on HomePods, said the people, who asked not to be named discussing internal company deliberations.
Currently, Spotify and other third-party music services can be streamed from ‌iPhone‌ or ‌iPad‌ to ‌HomePod‌ using Apple's AirPlay technology, but it's an ungainly alternative solution than just allowing users to stream third-party music services from the speaker directly.

As Gurman notes, opening the ‌HomePod‌ to additional music services could benefit the product's sales. The speaker has lagged behind rivals like the Amazon Echo in functionality since being introduced in 2018 and owns less than 5 percent of the smart-speaker market, according to an estimate last week from Strategy Analytics.

Whether the discussions include opening the ‌HomePod‌'s integrated Bluetooth technology to Bluetooth streaming devices is unknown. Currently, Bluetooth is used during the ‌HomePod‌'s setup process, but is otherwise rendered dormant in the speaker, which means only Apple devices can stream audio to ‌HomePod‌ using the ‌AirPlay‌ protocol.

Related Roundup: HomePod
Buyer's Guide: HomePod (Neutral)

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Bloomberg: ‘iPhone SE 2’ Launch Still on Course for March Despite Coronavirus Outbreak, New iPad Pro Models in First Half of 2020

Bloomberg this morning reports that Apple’s new low-cost iPhone is still on course for launch next month, despite the impact of the coronavirus outbreak on production, although new iPad Pro models originally scheduled for the first half of 2020 could yet face delays or constraints.

Image via @Onleaks

The [low-cost ‌iPhone‌] is still on track to launch in March, though the plans are still fluid, according to people familiar with the matter. Apple has also been preparing updated ‌iPad Pro‌ models with a new camera system for the first half of 2020 and the virus may yet impose delays or constraints on those plans.

Bloomberg‘s sources don’t conflict with noted analyst Ming-Chi Kuo‘s latest predictions for the new low-cost ‌iPhone‌, which is rumored to be based on the iPhone 8, but with upgraded internals. In a research note seen yesterday by MacRumors, Kuo reiterated his belief that the “iPhone 9” or “‌iPhone SE 2“‌ is still expected to launch in the first half of this year in spite of the impact of the viral outbreak on production.

Rumors have been pointing toward a significant ‌iPad Pro‌ update in the first half of this year, including a new triple-lens rear camera system supporting 3D sensing for immersive augmented reality experiences. Today’s report also broadly aligns with claims made on Monday by DigiTimes that production on the new ‌iPad Pro‌ models has been slow to ramp up following the extended Lunar New Year holiday, although the Taiwan-based website maintains that launch of the new devices is still expected “around March.”

Aside from potential delays, Apple’s spring media events have often occurred in March, and the list of products with rumored imminent updates has pointed toward one of those spring events being held again this year. A report yesterday claimed that Apple plans to hold a media event at the very end of March, with Tuesday, March 31 being the most likely date. The launch of the new low-cost ‌iPhone‌ is said to follow on Friday, April 3.

In addition to the new low-cost ‌‌iPhone‌, rumors suggest Apple is planning to release an updated 13-inch MacBook Pro, while more outlying launch possibilities for the first half of 2020 include a MacBook Air update, Apple’s Tile-like “AirTags” item trackers, and perhaps a wireless charging mat.

Related Roundups: iPad Pro, iPhone SE 2

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Bloomberg this morning reports that Apple's new low-cost iPhone is still on course for launch next month, despite the impact of the coronavirus outbreak on production, although new iPad Pro models originally scheduled for the first half of 2020 could yet face delays or constraints.

Image via @Onleaks
The [low-cost ‌iPhone‌] is still on track to launch in March, though the plans are still fluid, according to people familiar with the matter. Apple has also been preparing updated ‌iPad Pro‌ models with a new camera system for the first half of 2020 and the virus may yet impose delays or constraints on those plans.
Bloomberg's sources don't conflict with noted analyst Ming-Chi Kuo's latest predictions for the new low-cost ‌iPhone‌, which is rumored to be based on the iPhone 8, but with upgraded internals. In a research note seen yesterday by MacRumors, Kuo reiterated his belief that the "iPhone 9" or "‌iPhone SE 2"‌ is still expected to launch in the first half of this year in spite of the impact of the viral outbreak on production.

Rumors have been pointing toward a significant ‌iPad Pro‌ update in the first half of this year, including a new triple-lens rear camera system supporting 3D sensing for immersive augmented reality experiences. Today's report also broadly aligns with claims made on Monday by DigiTimes that production on the new ‌iPad Pro‌ models has been slow to ramp up following the extended Lunar New Year holiday, although the Taiwan-based website maintains that launch of the new devices is still expected "around March."

Aside from potential delays, Apple's spring media events have often occurred in March, and the list of products with rumored imminent updates has pointed toward one of those spring events being held again this year. A report yesterday claimed that Apple plans to hold a media event at the very end of March, with Tuesday, March 31 being the most likely date. The launch of the new low-cost ‌iPhone‌ is said to follow on Friday, April 3.

In addition to the new low-cost ‌‌iPhone‌, rumors suggest Apple is planning to release an updated 13-inch MacBook Pro, while more outlying launch possibilities for the first half of 2020 include a MacBook Air update, Apple's Tile-like "AirTags" item trackers, and perhaps a wireless charging mat.

Related Roundups: iPad Pro, iPhone SE 2

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Foxconn Warns Staff to Keep Away From Shenzhen iPhone Plant as Virus Prevention Efforts Continue

Apple’s main iPhone assembler Foxconn has told employees not to return to work at its Shenzhen facility in China when the extended Lunar New Year break ends on February 10, according to a memo obtained by Bloomberg.


“To safeguard everyone’s health and safety and comply with government virus prevention measures, we urge you not to return to Shenzhen,” Foxconn wrote in a text message sent to employees. “We’ll update you on the situation in the city. The company will protect everyone’s work-related rights and interests in the duration. As for the happy reunion date in Shenzhen, please wait for further notice.”

Foxconn has reportedly halted almost all of its production in China as the government and businesses attempt to contain the coronavirus outbreak in the country, where more than 31,000 cases have been reported so far.

It’s unclear whether the Shenzhen policy extends to all employees or to Foxconn’s other facilities. Earlier this week, the ‌iPhone‌ manufacturer said it planned to resume full-scale production by February 10. Other Apple suppliers such as Quanta Computer, Inventec and LG Display also said they would go back to work next week in China, but sticking to that plan seems less certain by the day.

“As a matter of policy and for reasons of commercial sensitivity, we do not comment on our specific production facilities,” Foxconn told Bloomberg. “We have been closely monitoring the current public health challenge linked to the coronavirus and we are applying all recommended health and hygiene practices to all aspects of our operations in the affected markets.”

Foxconn has slashed its 2020 revenue outlook after strict quarantines at its main base in China to guard against the coronavirus outbreak. The company has adopted a quarantine policy so that workers returning from outside Henan province will be sequestered for 14 days, while staff who reside within the province will be isolated for one week.

The timing of the coronavirus outbreak could impact supply of the new lower-cost iPhone that Apple is expected to announce in March. Bloomberg recently reported that production of the device was slated to begin in February, but the coronavirus outbreak could delay that timeframe.

Apple typically sources components from multiple suppliers, and Foxconn has factories outside of China, so it’s likely that Apple will still release the lower-cost ‌iPhone‌ in March, even if supply is limited at launch.

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Apple's main iPhone assembler Foxconn has told employees not to return to work at its Shenzhen facility in China when the extended Lunar New Year break ends on February 10, according to a memo obtained by Bloomberg.

"To safeguard everyone's health and safety and comply with government virus prevention measures, we urge you not to return to Shenzhen," Foxconn wrote in a text message sent to employees. "We'll update you on the situation in the city. The company will protect everyone's work-related rights and interests in the duration. As for the happy reunion date in Shenzhen, please wait for further notice."
Foxconn has reportedly halted almost all of its production in China as the government and businesses attempt to contain the coronavirus outbreak in the country, where more than 31,000 cases have been reported so far.

It's unclear whether the Shenzhen policy extends to all employees or to Foxconn's other facilities. Earlier this week, the ‌iPhone‌ manufacturer said it planned to resume full-scale production by February 10. Other Apple suppliers such as Quanta Computer, Inventec and LG Display also said they would go back to work next week in China, but sticking to that plan seems less certain by the day.
"As a matter of policy and for reasons of commercial sensitivity, we do not comment on our specific production facilities," Foxconn told Bloomberg. "We have been closely monitoring the current public health challenge linked to the coronavirus and we are applying all recommended health and hygiene practices to all aspects of our operations in the affected markets."
Foxconn has slashed its 2020 revenue outlook after strict quarantines at its main base in China to guard against the coronavirus outbreak. The company has adopted a quarantine policy so that workers returning from outside Henan province will be sequestered for 14 days, while staff who reside within the province will be isolated for one week.

The timing of the coronavirus outbreak could impact supply of the new lower-cost iPhone that Apple is expected to announce in March. Bloomberg recently reported that production of the device was slated to begin in February, but the coronavirus outbreak could delay that timeframe.

Apple typically sources components from multiple suppliers, and Foxconn has factories outside of China, so it's likely that Apple will still release the lower-cost ‌iPhone‌ in March, even if supply is limited at launch.


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Apple Suppliers in China Aim to Resume Full Production by February 10 Despite Coronavirus Outbreak

Apple suppliers in China including Foxconn plan to resume full-scale production by February 10, despite the coronavirus outbreak in the country, reports Bloomberg.


Foxconn’s Hon Hai, the most important manufacturer for the U.S. company, said Tuesday it still expects to be able to restart facilities throughout China on schedule, according to a text message sent to Bloomberg News. Suppliers such as Quanta Computer Inc., Inventec Corp. and LG Display Co. also said they would go back to work next week in China.

The vast majority of Apple’s iPhones are made in China, at Foxconn’s Zhengzhou plant and at Pegatron’s assembly site near Shanghai. Both locations are more than 500 kilometers away from Wuhan in central China, the epicenter of the viral outbreak.

Despite being ordered to halt “almost all” of its production in China through February 9, Foxconn recently claimed the viral outbreak has had a “fairly small impact” on iPhone production. Foxconn has factories in other countries such as Vietnam, India, and Mexico that have apparently been able to fill the gap.

Apple last week announced that it has closed all of its corporate offices, stores, and contact centers in mainland China through February 9 due to the Wuhan coronavirus outbreak, out of an abundance of caution. Apple has around 10,000 direct employees in China, across its retail and corporate divisions.

The timing of the coronavirus outbreak could impact supply of the new lower-cost iPhone that Apple is expected to announce in March. Bloomberg recently reported that production of the device was slated to begin in February, but the coronavirus outbreak could delay that timeframe.

More than 20,000 people have been infected with the virus and more than 400 have died. Last week, the World Health Organization declared the Wuhan coronavirus outbreak a global public health emergency. More information about the virus and how to protect yourself is available on the agency’s website.

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Apple suppliers in China including Foxconn plan to resume full-scale production by February 10, despite the coronavirus outbreak in the country, reports Bloomberg.

Foxconn's Hon Hai, the most important manufacturer for the U.S. company, said Tuesday it still expects to be able to restart facilities throughout China on schedule, according to a text message sent to Bloomberg News. Suppliers such as Quanta Computer Inc., Inventec Corp. and LG Display Co. also said they would go back to work next week in China.
The vast majority of Apple's iPhones are made in China, at Foxconn's Zhengzhou plant and at Pegatron's assembly site near Shanghai. Both locations are more than 500 kilometers away from Wuhan in central China, the epicenter of the viral outbreak.

Despite being ordered to halt "almost all" of its production in China through February 9, Foxconn recently claimed the viral outbreak has had a "fairly small impact" on iPhone production. Foxconn has factories in other countries such as Vietnam, India, and Mexico that have apparently been able to fill the gap.

Apple last week announced that it has closed all of its corporate offices, stores, and contact centers in mainland China through February 9 due to the Wuhan coronavirus outbreak, out of an abundance of caution. Apple has around 10,000 direct employees in China, across its retail and corporate divisions.

The timing of the coronavirus outbreak could impact supply of the new lower-cost iPhone that Apple is expected to announce in March. Bloomberg recently reported that production of the device was slated to begin in February, but the coronavirus outbreak could delay that timeframe.

More than 20,000 people have been infected with the virus and more than 400 have died. Last week, the World Health Organization declared the Wuhan coronavirus outbreak a global public health emergency. More information about the virus and how to protect yourself is available on the agency's website.


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Coronavirus Outbreak Could Impact ‘iPhone 9’ Production Reportedly Scheduled for February

Apple’s production plans for the so-called “iPhone SE 2” or “iPhone 9” could face disruption after the Lunar New Year holiday due to the coronavirus outbreak that caused more than 100 deaths in China, reports Bloomberg‘s Mark Gurman.

“‌iPhone 9‌” concept render by @OnLeaks via iGeeksBlog

The vast majority of Apple’s iPhones are made in China, by Foxconn in Zhengzhou and by Pegatron at an assembly plant near Shanghai. Both of the locations are more than 500 kilometers away from Wuhan, the epicenter of the virus outbreak, but Gurman suggests the distance “doesn’t immunize them from its effects,” and analysts he spoke to agreed.

“I can’t imagine a scenario where the supply chain isn’t disrupted,” said veteran industry analyst Patrick Moorhead of Moor Insights & Strategy. “If there’s one major hiccup in the raw materials, fabrication, assembly, test, and shipping, it will be a disruption.”

Apple typically launches its flagship smartphones around September, so the coronavirus shouldn’t affect those plans, but Apple is also reportedly prepping a new low-cost iPhone that’s set to be released during the first half of 2020 – possibly as early as March – which puts those mass production plans “more at risk,” says Gurman.

Apple has booked orders for up to 65 million of its older iPhones and up to 15 million units of the “‌iPhone 9‌,” according to the Nikkei Asian Review. However, the mass production which is reportedly due to start in the third week of February might be delayed due to the virus outbreak.

Confirmed cases of the coronavirus are rising in Henan province, where the Zhengzhou facility is located, and that could lead Foxconn or the government to close factories to prevent further contamination, according to Bloomberg‘s Matthew Kanterman.

Foxconn said it is monitoring the situation in China and following all recommended health practices. It declined to comment on production in specific locations but said, “We can confirm that we have measures in place to ensure that we can continue to meet all global manufacturing obligations.”

Gurman notes that Apple dual-sources many of its components to mitigate the impact of extreme scenarios like the coronavirus. As such, a major immediate impact to its production plans is unlikely for now, according to a person familiar with its operations.

Over the weekend, Apple chief Tim Cook said in a tweet that the company intends to donate money in support of groups in China fighting the outbreak of the Coronavirus. A coronavirus is a family of viruses that include the common cold, but this particular virus causes severe acute respiratory infection and has never been detected before.

Related Roundup: iPhone SE 2

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Apple's production plans for the so-called "iPhone SE 2" or "iPhone 9" could face disruption after the Lunar New Year holiday due to the coronavirus outbreak that caused more than 100 deaths in China, reports Bloomberg's Mark Gurman.

"‌iPhone 9‌" concept render by @OnLeaks via iGeeksBlog

The vast majority of Apple's iPhones are made in China, by Foxconn in Zhengzhou and by Pegatron at an assembly plant near Shanghai. Both of the locations are more than 500 kilometers away from Wuhan, the epicenter of the virus outbreak, but Gurman suggests the distance "doesn't immunize them from its effects," and analysts he spoke to agreed.
"I can't imagine a scenario where the supply chain isn't disrupted," said veteran industry analyst Patrick Moorhead of Moor Insights & Strategy. "If there's one major hiccup in the raw materials, fabrication, assembly, test, and shipping, it will be a disruption."
Apple typically launches its flagship smartphones around September, so the coronavirus shouldn't affect those plans, but Apple is also reportedly prepping a new low-cost iPhone that's set to be released during the first half of 2020 – possibly as early as March – which puts those mass production plans "more at risk," says Gurman.

Apple has booked orders for up to 65 million of its older iPhones and up to 15 million units of the "‌iPhone 9‌," according to the Nikkei Asian Review. However, the mass production which is reportedly due to start in the third week of February might be delayed due to the virus outbreak.

Confirmed cases of the coronavirus are rising in Henan province, where the Zhengzhou facility is located, and that could lead Foxconn or the government to close factories to prevent further contamination, according to Bloomberg's Matthew Kanterman.
Foxconn said it is monitoring the situation in China and following all recommended health practices. It declined to comment on production in specific locations but said, "We can confirm that we have measures in place to ensure that we can continue to meet all global manufacturing obligations."
Gurman notes that Apple dual-sources many of its components to mitigate the impact of extreme scenarios like the coronavirus. As such, a major immediate impact to its production plans is unlikely for now, according to a person familiar with its operations.

Over the weekend, Apple chief Tim Cook said in a tweet that the company intends to donate money in support of groups in China fighting the outbreak of the Coronavirus. A coronavirus is a family of viruses that include the common cold, but this particular virus causes severe acute respiratory infection and has never been detected before.

Related Roundup: iPhone SE 2

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Apple to Attend CES 2020 in Rare Official Appearance

Apple will make a rare official appearance at next week’s annual Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas where its HomeKit smart home system will take the limelight, reports Bloomberg‘s Mark Gurman.


With Amazon and Google expected to roll out new software capabilities for their internet-connected products and voice-activated smart platforms, Apple’s own smart home system will also be on show.

Apple’s ‌HomeKit‌, a system for controlling devices in the home, will also be on display. Some companies will show off new gadgets for the home that work with Siri, Apple’s digital assistant.

According to the report, the company isn’t expected to release any new hardware at the trade show, but Apple executive Jane Horvath is scheduled to speak on a consumer privacy panel on January 7.

Ahead of last year’s CES, Apple put up a giant sign in Las Vegas touting the security of its devices, and in 2018 some Apple employees reportedly met with potential augmented-reality glasses suppliers there, but otherwise it has traditionally chosen to stay away. Apple’s presence at CES 2020 is the first time in decades that the company has attended in an official capacity.

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Apple will make a rare official appearance at next week's annual Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas where its HomeKit smart home system will take the limelight, reports Bloomberg's Mark Gurman.


With Amazon and Google expected to roll out new software capabilities for their internet-connected products and voice-activated smart platforms, Apple's own smart home system will also be on show.
Apple's ‌HomeKit‌, a system for controlling devices in the home, will also be on display. Some companies will show off new gadgets for the home that work with Siri, Apple's digital assistant.
According to the report, the company isn't expected to release any new hardware at the trade show, but Apple executive Jane Horvath is scheduled to speak on a consumer privacy panel on January 7.

Ahead of last year's CES, Apple put up a giant sign in Las Vegas touting the security of its devices, and in 2018 some Apple employees reportedly met with potential augmented-reality glasses suppliers there, but otherwise it has traditionally chosen to stay away. Apple's presence at CES 2020 is the first time in decades that the company has attended in an official capacity.


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Report: Apple Has ‘Secret Team’ Working on Satellites to Beam Data Directly to iPhones

Apple has a dedicated research team looking into new ways to beam data like internet connectivity directly to iPhones and other devices, reports Bloomberg‘s Mark Gurman.


The Cupertino, California-based iPhone maker has about a dozen engineers from the aerospace, satellite and antenna design industries working on the project with the goal of deploying their results within five years, said the people, who asked not to be identified discussing internal company efforts. Work on the project is still early and could be abandoned, the people said, and a clear direction and use for satellites hasn’t been finalized.

According to the report, Apple’s main aim is to beam data to a user’s ‌iPhone‌, potentially reducing the dependence on wireless carriers, or for linking devices together without a traditional network, thereby mitigating coverage issues. Apple could also be exploring satellites for more precise location tracking for its devices, enabling improved maps and new features.

Apple CEO Tim Cook has reportedly made the project a company priority, and Apple is said to be ramping up hiring, with new software and hardware experts being added to the team. The company has also hired additional executives from the aerospace and wireless data delivery fields, and is seeking engineers with experience in designing components for communications equipment. Apple is said to be hoping for the initiative to produce results within five years.

Back in 2017, Bloomberg reported that Apple had hired John Fenwick and Michael Trela, two Google executives who led the search giant’s satellite and spacecraft operations. At the time, what the two would be doing at Apple was unclear, but Bloomberg now reports that Fenwick and Trela are leading the team dedicated to satellites and related wireless technology.

According to the report, the team has recently added people from the wireless industry, including engineer Matt Ettus, one of the foremost names in wireless technologies; Ashley Moore Williams, a longtime executive from Aerospace who focused on communication satellites; and Daniel Ellis, a former Netflix executive who helped oversee the company’s Content Delivery Network. Ellis is said to have experience in building networks that can beam content and information on a global scale.

What remains unclear is whether Apple plans to develop its own satellite systems or make use of ground-based technology that could receive data from existing satellites and send it to mobile devices. Efforts by the likes of Facebook and Amazon to deploy satellites are a long way from becoming reality, but Apple could potentially look to existing satellite makers like Northrop Grumman, Lockheed Martin, and Boeing to provide the necessary hardware in the sky.

This article, “Report: Apple Has ‘Secret Team’ Working on Satellites to Beam Data Directly to iPhones” first appeared on MacRumors.com

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Apple has a dedicated research team looking into new ways to beam data like internet connectivity directly to iPhones and other devices, reports Bloomberg's Mark Gurman.

The Cupertino, California-based iPhone maker has about a dozen engineers from the aerospace, satellite and antenna design industries working on the project with the goal of deploying their results within five years, said the people, who asked not to be identified discussing internal company efforts. Work on the project is still early and could be abandoned, the people said, and a clear direction and use for satellites hasn’t been finalized.
According to the report, Apple's main aim is to beam data to a user's ‌iPhone‌, potentially reducing the dependence on wireless carriers, or for linking devices together without a traditional network, thereby mitigating coverage issues. Apple could also be exploring satellites for more precise location tracking for its devices, enabling improved maps and new features.

Apple CEO Tim Cook has reportedly made the project a company priority, and Apple is said to be ramping up hiring, with new software and hardware experts being added to the team. The company has also hired additional executives from the aerospace and wireless data delivery fields, and is seeking engineers with experience in designing components for communications equipment. Apple is said to be hoping for the initiative to produce results within five years.

Back in 2017, Bloomberg reported that Apple had hired John Fenwick and Michael Trela, two Google executives who led the search giant's satellite and spacecraft operations. At the time, what the two would be doing at Apple was unclear, but Bloomberg now reports that Fenwick and Trela are leading the team dedicated to satellites and related wireless technology.

According to the report, the team has recently added people from the wireless industry, including engineer Matt Ettus, one of the foremost names in wireless technologies; Ashley Moore Williams, a longtime executive from Aerospace who focused on communication satellites; and Daniel Ellis, a former Netflix executive who helped oversee the company's Content Delivery Network. Ellis is said to have experience in building networks that can beam content and information on a global scale.

What remains unclear is whether Apple plans to develop its own satellite systems or make use of ground-based technology that could receive data from existing satellites and send it to mobile devices. Efforts by the likes of Facebook and Amazon to deploy satellites are a long way from becoming reality, but Apple could potentially look to existing satellite makers like Northrop Grumman, Lockheed Martin, and Boeing to provide the necessary hardware in the sky.


This article, "Report: Apple Has 'Secret Team' Working on Satellites to Beam Data Directly to iPhones" first appeared on MacRumors.com

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Apple Reportedly Overhauling Its Software Development Process Following Buggy Release of iOS 13

Apple is overhauling the way it develops and tests iOS, macOS, watchOS, and tvOS in hopes that the new approach will improve the quality of each software platform over the long term, according to Bloomberg‘s Mark Gurman.


The report claims the new strategy is already being applied to development of iOS 14 ahead of its release next year. The shift comes after the buggy release of iOS 13, which has already received eight updates with bug fixes and delayed features in the last two months, which is more than usual over that time.

The new process will see Apple implement “flags,” allowing the company’s software engineers to selectively enable or disable unfinished or buggy features in an isolated way to ensure that overall stability is not jeopardized. Flags are already commonly used by other tech companies like Google and Microsoft.

Apple has also considered delaying some iOS 14 features until 2021, according to the report, as part of its efforts to ensure the update is more stable. Apple is believed to have taken a similar approach with iOS 12, delaying some features until ‌iOS 13‌, which contributed to iOS 12 being a rather stable update.

The changes were reportedly announced at a recent meeting with employees led by Apple’s software engineering chief Craig Federighi.

In the meantime, Apple continues to test iOS 13.3, with a third beta released this week.

Related Roundups: iOS 13, iPadOS

This article, “Apple Reportedly Overhauling Its Software Development Process Following Buggy Release of iOS 13” first appeared on MacRumors.com

Discuss this article in our forums

Apple is overhauling the way it develops and tests iOS, macOS, watchOS, and tvOS in hopes that the new approach will improve the quality of each software platform over the long term, according to Bloomberg's Mark Gurman.


The report claims the new strategy is already being applied to development of iOS 14 ahead of its release next year. The shift comes after the buggy release of iOS 13, which has already received eight updates with bug fixes and delayed features in the last two months, which is more than usual over that time.

The new process will see Apple implement "flags," allowing the company's software engineers to selectively enable or disable unfinished or buggy features in an isolated way to ensure that overall stability is not jeopardized. Flags are already commonly used by other tech companies like Google and Microsoft.

Apple has also considered delaying some iOS 14 features until 2021, according to the report, as part of its efforts to ensure the update is more stable. Apple is believed to have taken a similar approach with iOS 12, delaying some features until ‌iOS 13‌, which contributed to iOS 12 being a rather stable update.

The changes were reportedly announced at a recent meeting with employees led by Apple's software engineering chief Craig Federighi.

In the meantime, Apple continues to test iOS 13.3, with a third beta released this week.

Related Roundups: iOS 13, iPadOS

This article, "Apple Reportedly Overhauling Its Software Development Process Following Buggy Release of iOS 13" first appeared on MacRumors.com

Discuss this article in our forums