China aluminum imports surge continues well into 2021

When the largest aluminum producer on earth keeps reporting high import figures, the world sits up and takes note. According to figures released by the Chinese General Administration of Customs a few days ago, China recorded a new high for aluminum imports in March 2021. Stop obsessing about the actual forecasted aluminum price. It’s more…

The post China aluminum imports surge continues well into 2021 appeared first on Steel, Aluminum, Copper, Stainless, Rare Earth, Metal Prices, Forecasting | MetalMiner.

When the largest aluminum producer on earth keeps reporting high import figures, the world sits up and takes note. According to figures released by the Chinese General Administration of Customs a few days ago, China recorded a new high for aluminum imports in March 2021. Stop obsessing about the actual forecasted aluminum price. It’s more...

The post China aluminum imports surge continues well into 2021 appeared first on Steel, Aluminum, Copper, Stainless, Rare Earth, Metal Prices, Forecasting | MetalMiner.

Apple TV Launch in Mainland China Reportedly Imminent

Apple TV has received the proper and needed regulatory approval to officially launch in mainland China, according to sources across Chinese social media platform Weibo and popular local tech blogger @Voooolks.


According to the blogger, who has more than 1.4 million followers on Weibo, Apple TV has received approval from China’s State Administration of Press and Publication, Radio, Film, and Television to launch in the country. A rumor earlier this month indicated that Apple TV was under review by the state agency.

The news of a possible imminent launch of Apple TV in China comes almost a week following the announcement of a new, more powerful Apple TV. Last week Apple unveiled an updated Apple TV with the more powerful A12 Bionic chip and a redesigned Apple TV remote.

China adheres to a strict set of rules regarding the flow of content within its borders. Like all international companies wishing to operate with Chinese customers, Apple must abide by and follow the local law.

Even with current services and products in China, such as the App Store, content is regulated to a strict set of standards. If Apple TV were to launch in China, it would likely be limited in functionality besides basic features such as AirPlay 2 and other native Apple features. Content availability with popular channels and apps such as Netflix, YouTube, Hulu, and others won’t be available, under current local law.

Even in a limited scope, an Apple TV launch in China would play to Apple’s growing role in the country. CEO Tim Cook and other Apple executives often call China an increasingly important market where competition is fierce with local companies such as Huwaei. In conjunction with a loyal consumer base, China contuines to serve as Apple’s major production hub.

Update: The leaker has posted saying he apologizes for “exposing” the information about Apple TV. A launch is always possible, however, the blogger seems to have backed down from his previous claim.

Related Roundups: Apple TV, tvOS 14
Tag: China
Buyer’s Guide: Apple TV (Caution)

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Apple TV has received the proper and needed regulatory approval to officially launch in mainland China, according to sources across Chinese social media platform Weibo and popular local tech blogger @Voooolks.


According to the blogger, who has more than 1.4 million followers on Weibo, Apple TV has received approval from China's State Administration of Press and Publication, Radio, Film, and Television to launch in the country. A rumor earlier this month indicated that Apple TV was under review by the state agency.

The news of a possible imminent launch of Apple TV in China comes almost a week following the announcement of a new, more powerful Apple TV. Last week Apple unveiled an updated Apple TV with the more powerful A12 Bionic chip and a redesigned Apple TV remote.

China adheres to a strict set of rules regarding the flow of content within its borders. Like all international companies wishing to operate with Chinese customers, Apple must abide by and follow the local law.

Even with current services and products in China, such as the App Store, content is regulated to a strict set of standards. If Apple TV were to launch in China, it would likely be limited in functionality besides basic features such as AirPlay 2 and other native Apple features. Content availability with popular channels and apps such as Netflix, YouTube, Hulu, and others won't be available, under current local law.

Even in a limited scope, an Apple TV launch in China would play to Apple's growing role in the country. CEO Tim Cook and other Apple executives often call China an increasingly important market where competition is fierce with local companies such as Huwaei. In conjunction with a loyal consumer base, China contuines to serve as Apple's major production hub.

Update: The leaker has posted saying he apologizes for "exposing" the information about Apple TV. A launch is always possible, however, the blogger seems to have backed down from his previous claim.
Related Roundups: Apple TV, tvOS 14
Tag: China
Buyer's Guide: Apple TV (Caution)

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P&G Wanted to Skirt App Tracking Transparency Rules With China Data Collection Tech

Procter & Gamble Co. was one of the companies that worked with the China Advertising Association to test a new data collection tool designed to get around Apple’s App Tracking Transparency rules, reports The Wall Street Journal.


The state-backed China Advertising Agency developed a new method of tracking users called CAID to replace access to the IDFA or advertising identifier of an iPhone or iPad. Starting with iOS 14.5, Apple will not let apps access the IDFA of a device without express user permission, which will have an impact on cross-app and cross-website tracking used for ad targeting.

CAID has been in testing in China with major companies like Baidu, ByteDance (TikTok), and Tencent, as well as Proctor and Gamble. Apple in mid-March began warning developers not to circumvent App Tracking Transparency rules with methods like CAID. Apple has told developers that attempting to get around the new ad tracking restrictions will result in removal from the App Store.

“The ‌App Store‌ terms and guidelines apply equally to all developers around the world, including Apple,” an Apple spokesperson told The Wall Street Journal. “We believe strongly that users should be asked for their permission before being tracked. Apps that are found to disregard the user’s choice will be rejected.”

As a major worldwide advertiser, P&G has a vested interest in tracking users, and is the biggest Western company involved in the efforts to create an App Tracking Transparency alternative. P&G owns many major brands that include Gillette, Charmin, Pampers, Tide, Bounty, Pantene, Crest, Febreeze, and tons more.

In a statement, P&G told The Wall Street Journal that it is providing input to the China Advertising Agency in an effort to “deliver useful content consumers want in a way that prioritizes data privacy, transparency and consent.” Delivering useful content to consumers “means partnering with platforms and publishers–both directly and through our advertising associations across the globe.”

P&G maintains its own consumer database that does not rely on Facebook, Google, and other ad platforms. According to The Wall Street Journal, P&G has built a database of 1.5 million customers worldwide using a combination of anonymous consumer IDs and personal information that customers share. P&G largely uses this database in China, where it spends 80 percent of its digital ad buying on targeted ads.

P&G declined to offer additional details on the CAID tool and did not say whether it will use the technology. It is not yet clear how Apple will respond to CAID if some of the biggest companies in the world adopt the ad tracking alternative. When news about the warnings to Chinese developers came out, a Chinese marketing industry veteran said that Apple’s actions could “put a stop” to CAID testing.

Other U.S. companies that include Deloitte, PricewaterhouseCoopers, and Nielsen are also working with the China Advertising Agency on CAID.

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Procter & Gamble Co. was one of the companies that worked with the China Advertising Association to test a new data collection tool designed to get around Apple's App Tracking Transparency rules, reports The Wall Street Journal.


The state-backed China Advertising Agency developed a new method of tracking users called CAID to replace access to the IDFA or advertising identifier of an iPhone or iPad. Starting with iOS 14.5, Apple will not let apps access the IDFA of a device without express user permission, which will have an impact on cross-app and cross-website tracking used for ad targeting.

CAID has been in testing in China with major companies like Baidu, ByteDance (TikTok), and Tencent, as well as Proctor and Gamble. Apple in mid-March began warning developers not to circumvent App Tracking Transparency rules with methods like CAID. Apple has told developers that attempting to get around the new ad tracking restrictions will result in removal from the App Store.

"The ‌App Store‌ terms and guidelines apply equally to all developers around the world, including Apple," an Apple spokesperson told The Wall Street Journal. "We believe strongly that users should be asked for their permission before being tracked. Apps that are found to disregard the user's choice will be rejected."

As a major worldwide advertiser, P&G has a vested interest in tracking users, and is the biggest Western company involved in the efforts to create an App Tracking Transparency alternative. P&G owns many major brands that include Gillette, Charmin, Pampers, Tide, Bounty, Pantene, Crest, Febreeze, and tons more.

In a statement, P&G told The Wall Street Journal that it is providing input to the China Advertising Agency in an effort to "deliver useful content consumers want in a way that prioritizes data privacy, transparency and consent." Delivering useful content to consumers "means partnering with platforms and publishers--both directly and through our advertising associations across the globe."

P&G maintains its own consumer database that does not rely on Facebook, Google, and other ad platforms. According to The Wall Street Journal, P&G has built a database of 1.5 million customers worldwide using a combination of anonymous consumer IDs and personal information that customers share. P&G largely uses this database in China, where it spends 80 percent of its digital ad buying on targeted ads.

P&G declined to offer additional details on the CAID tool and did not say whether it will use the technology. It is not yet clear how Apple will respond to CAID if some of the biggest companies in the world adopt the ad tracking alternative. When news about the warnings to Chinese developers came out, a Chinese marketing industry veteran said that Apple's actions could "put a stop" to CAID testing.

Other U.S. companies that include Deloitte, PricewaterhouseCoopers, and Nielsen are also working with the China Advertising Agency on CAID.
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China’s aluminum industry under pressure to reduce emissions

China — and, indeed, Asia as a whole — has a serious issue evolving that few would have seen coming five years ago. Back then, the carbon content of aluminium was a well-known fact. However, its light weight and high recyclability seemed to outweigh the CO2 emissions inherent in its production. Not so now. Grab…

The post China’s aluminum industry under pressure to reduce emissions appeared first on Steel, Aluminum, Copper, Stainless, Rare Earth, Metal Prices, Forecasting | MetalMiner.

China — and, indeed, Asia as a whole — has a serious issue evolving that few would have seen coming five years ago. Back then, the carbon content of aluminium was a well-known fact. However, its light weight and high recyclability seemed to outweigh the CO2 emissions inherent in its production. Not so now. Grab...

The post China’s aluminum industry under pressure to reduce emissions appeared first on Steel, Aluminum, Copper, Stainless, Rare Earth, Metal Prices, Forecasting | MetalMiner.

Apple Warns Chinese Tech Companies Not to Circumvent App Tracking Transparency Rules

Apple is cracking down on Chinese tech companies that are working on ways to get around upcoming App Tracking Transparency rules, reports Financial Times.


Starting in iOS 14.5, Apple plans to begin requiring app developers to obtain express user permission before accessing an iPhone‘s advertising identifier or IDFA, and earlier this week, news suggested that the state-backed China Advertising Association was testing a tool to skirt Apple’s rules.

Apple on Thursday sent warnings to at least two Chinese app developers using methods to track app usage without user permission. “We found that your app collects user and device information to create a unique identifier for the user’s device,” reads Apple’s email, which says that the developer must update the app to comply with App Store rules within 14 days or risk its removal from the ‌App Store‌.

According to Financial Times, the app developer in question was using a tool called CAID, which was developed by the aforementioned China Advertising Association. The China Advertising Association this week said that CAID it is not “in opposition” to Apple’s privacy policy, but that may not be accurate given the warnings that Apple sent out today.

A Chinese marketing industry veteran told Financial Times that “big and small firms” in China are all considering CAID, but Apple’s recent actions “will put a stop to these tests.” Some of the biggest tech companies in China, such as Baidu, ByteDance, and Tencent, are all testing or implementing CAID to identify users.

ByteDance, for example, has recommended that developers use its SDK to issue CAID1 and CAID2 identifiers. One is based on a user’s IP address and the other is based on the phone’s IMEI, which is a unique identification number. The CAID1 and CAID2 identifiers violate Apple’s rules because they do not ask for user permission before collecting this data. ByteDance has also recommended that developers use “fingerprinting and probabilistic matching” to identify users, which is also against the ‌App Store‌ Guidelines for App Tracking Transparency.

The China Advertising Association said that it is developing additional services that will collect and store personal data from users to create a “fingerprint” for each person. Any app that uses the CAID system will collect user data and send it to a central server to create a CAID identifier that will be used for cross-app user identification purposes. The CAA claims that users can opt out of CAID, but by Apple’s definitions, it is not allowed in the first place.

Tech experts believe that Chinese apps plan to tweak their apps in “numerous ways” to get past Apple’s ‌App Store‌ review team, with one likening it to a “cat-and-mouse” game. Apple has said multiple times that apps that disregard user preference when it comes to ad tracking will be rejected, which could lead to difficulties with Chinese companies and the Chinese government going forward.

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Apple is cracking down on Chinese tech companies that are working on ways to get around upcoming App Tracking Transparency rules, reports Financial Times.


Starting in iOS 14.5, Apple plans to begin requiring app developers to obtain express user permission before accessing an iPhone's advertising identifier or IDFA, and earlier this week, news suggested that the state-backed China Advertising Association was testing a tool to skirt Apple's rules.

Apple on Thursday sent warnings to at least two Chinese app developers using methods to track app usage without user permission. "We found that your app collects user and device information to create a unique identifier for the user's device," reads Apple's email, which says that the developer must update the app to comply with App Store rules within 14 days or risk its removal from the ‌App Store‌.

According to Financial Times, the app developer in question was using a tool called CAID, which was developed by the aforementioned China Advertising Association. The China Advertising Association this week said that CAID it is not "in opposition" to Apple's privacy policy, but that may not be accurate given the warnings that Apple sent out today.

A Chinese marketing industry veteran told Financial Times that "big and small firms" in China are all considering CAID, but Apple's recent actions "will put a stop to these tests." Some of the biggest tech companies in China, such as Baidu, ByteDance, and Tencent, are all testing or implementing CAID to identify users.

ByteDance, for example, has recommended that developers use its SDK to issue CAID1 and CAID2 identifiers. One is based on a user's IP address and the other is based on the phone's IMEI, which is a unique identification number. The CAID1 and CAID2 identifiers violate Apple's rules because they do not ask for user permission before collecting this data. ByteDance has also recommended that developers use "fingerprinting and probabilistic matching" to identify users, which is also against the ‌App Store‌ Guidelines for App Tracking Transparency.

The China Advertising Association said that it is developing additional services that will collect and store personal data from users to create a "fingerprint" for each person. Any app that uses the CAID system will collect user data and send it to a central server to create a CAID identifier that will be used for cross-app user identification purposes. The CAA claims that users can opt out of CAID, but by Apple's definitions, it is not allowed in the first place.

Tech experts believe that Chinese apps plan to tweak their apps in "numerous ways" to get past Apple's ‌App Store‌ review team, with one likening it to a "cat-and-mouse" game. Apple has said multiple times that apps that disregard user preference when it comes to ad tracking will be rejected, which could lead to difficulties with Chinese companies and the Chinese government going forward.
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Chinese Tech Companies Reportedly Testing New Tool to Circumvent Apple’s App Tracking Transparency Rules

Apple plans to begin enforcing its App Tracking Transparency changes following the release of iOS 14.5, and all apps that access an iPhone‘s ad identifier or IDFA will need to ask a user’s permission before tracking is allowed.


According to a new report by the Financial Times, however, the state-backed China Advertising Association (CAA) is testing a tool that could be used to bypass the new Apple privacy rules and allow companies to continue tracking users without their consent.

The new method of tracking users is called CAID, which is said to be undergoing testing by tech companies and advertisers in China. According to the report, TikTok owner ByteDance has already provided its developers with an 11-page guide suggesting that advertisers “use the CAID as a substitute if the user’s IDFA is unavailable.”

However, the CAA told FT that the tool “does not stand in opposition to Apple’s privacy policy” and that the association “is currently actively communicating with Apple,” while the CAID solution has not yet been formally implemented.

Apple declined to directly comment on the potential use of CAID to get around its new App Tracking Transparency rules, but told the newspaper that it wouldn’t grant any exceptions.

“The App Store terms and guidelines apply equally to all developers around the world, including Apple,” the company told FT. “We believe strongly that users should be asked for their permission before being tracked. Apps that are found to disregard the user’s choice will be rejected.”

However, two people briefed on the issue told the newspaper that Apple is aware of the tool and seems to have so far turned a blind eye to its use.

Apple is believed to have the capacity to detect which apps use the CAID tool and could block them from its ‌App Store‌ in China, if it wanted to. But such a response could ignite a major confrontation if CAID receives the support of China’s technology companies as well as its government agencies.

Three people with knowledge of briefings between Apple and developers also said the Cupertino, California-based company would be wary of taking strong action, despite a clear violation of its stated rules, if CAID has the support of China’s tech giants as well as its government agencies.

Rich Bishop, chief executive of AppInChina, a leading publisher of international software in China, suggested that Apple might “make an exception for China” because tech companies and the government are “so closely aligned.”

It still remains unclear how the CAID system works, but Beijing-based data privacy company Digital Union believes that the system has been designed with Apple’s rules in mind because its tracking methods may not uniquely identify users. “This is the room that the industry has left to explore,” Yang told FT, suggesting the grey area was intentional.

CAID is reportedly scheduled to be publicly released as soon as this week, and although the system is intended to be used by local app developers in China, at least one French gaming group is said to have been encouraged to apply to use it and several foreign advertising companies have already applied on behalf of their Chinese divisions.

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Apple plans to begin enforcing its App Tracking Transparency changes following the release of iOS 14.5, and all apps that access an iPhone's ad identifier or IDFA will need to ask a user's permission before tracking is allowed.


According to a new report by the Financial Times, however, the state-backed China Advertising Association (CAA) is testing a tool that could be used to bypass the new Apple privacy rules and allow companies to continue tracking users without their consent.

The new method of tracking users is called CAID, which is said to be undergoing testing by tech companies and advertisers in China. According to the report, TikTok owner ByteDance has already provided its developers with an 11-page guide suggesting that advertisers "use the CAID as a substitute if the user's IDFA is unavailable."

However, the CAA told FT that the tool "does not stand in opposition to Apple's privacy policy" and that the association "is currently actively communicating with Apple," while the CAID solution has not yet been formally implemented.

Apple declined to directly comment on the potential use of CAID to get around its new App Tracking Transparency rules, but told the newspaper that it wouldn't grant any exceptions.
"The App Store terms and guidelines apply equally to all developers around the world, including Apple," the company told FT. "We believe strongly that users should be asked for their permission before being tracked. Apps that are found to disregard the user’s choice will be rejected."

However, two people briefed on the issue told the newspaper that Apple is aware of the tool and seems to have so far turned a blind eye to its use.
Apple is believed to have the capacity to detect which apps use the CAID tool and could block them from its ‌App Store‌ in China, if it wanted to. But such a response could ignite a major confrontation if CAID receives the support of China's technology companies as well as its government agencies.
Three people with knowledge of briefings between Apple and developers also said the Cupertino, California-based company would be wary of taking strong action, despite a clear violation of its stated rules, if CAID has the support of China's tech giants as well as its government agencies.

Rich Bishop, chief executive of AppInChina, a leading publisher of international software in China, suggested that Apple might "make an exception for China" because tech companies and the government are "so closely aligned."
It still remains unclear how the CAID system works, but Beijing-based data privacy company Digital Union believes that the system has been designed with Apple's rules in mind because its tracking methods may not uniquely identify users. "This is the room that the industry has left to explore," Yang told FT, suggesting the grey area was intentional.

CAID is reportedly scheduled to be publicly released as soon as this week, and although the system is intended to be used by local app developers in China, at least one French gaming group is said to have been encouraged to apply to use it and several foreign advertising companies have already applied on behalf of their Chinese divisions.
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Encrypted Messaging App Signal Stops Working in China

Encrypted messaging app Signal appears to have been banned in China, reports TechCrunch. While the app remains available in the App Store, the service is no longer operational in mainland China, according to the censorship tracking website Greatfire.org.

Western-run social networks like Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram have been unavailable in the country for some time, but Signal has largely flown under the radar of China’s authorities until now. Signal has yet to comment on the issue.

It’s unclear what has caused the country’s government to act and whether the ban is permanent, however Signal and rival service Telegram have both recently experienced a significant uptick in users following WhatsApp’s bungled PR campaign explaining its upcoming privacy policy update.

Like Signal, Telegram and WhatsApp are still listed on the China ‌App Store‌, although access to the services requires the use of VPNs – another category of apps that local authorities have cracked down on in recent years.

VPNs circumvent China’s “Great Firewall” by routing and encrypting internet traffic to servers outside of the country, making them popular with privacy-conscious users who have limited access to online content because of government restrictions.

Tags: China, Signal

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Encrypted messaging app Signal appears to have been banned in China, reports TechCrunch. While the app remains available in the App Store, the service is no longer operational in mainland China, according to the censorship tracking website Greatfire.org.

Western-run social networks like Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram have been unavailable in the country for some time, but Signal has largely flown under the radar of China's authorities until now. Signal has yet to comment on the issue.

It's unclear what has caused the country's government to act and whether the ban is permanent, however Signal and rival service Telegram have both recently experienced a significant uptick in users following WhatsApp's bungled PR campaign explaining its upcoming privacy policy update.

Like Signal, Telegram and WhatsApp are still listed on the China ‌App Store‌, although access to the services requires the use of VPNs – another category of apps that local authorities have cracked down on in recent years.

VPNs circumvent China's "Great Firewall" by routing and encrypting internet traffic to servers outside of the country, making them popular with privacy-conscious users who have limited access to online content because of government restrictions.
Tags: China, Signal

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Tim Cook Attending Chinese Development Conference Later This Month

Apple CEO Tim Cook will be one of the 100-plus high-profile CEOs and executives in attendance at this year’s China Development Forum (CDF) being held Saturday, March 20 through Monday, March 22, Global Times reports.


The CDF is an annual conference organized and led by the Development Research Center of the State Council, to gather the world’s most prominent executives and CEOs to discuss China’s economic future and the roadmap of the global economy. BMW’s chairman of the management board, Oliver Zipse, will co-chair this year’s conference.

According to a description from the state-run outlet Global Times, this year’s forum will mark the “first five-year plan for the country (China) to embark on a new journey to fully build a modern socialist country and realize the second centenary goal.” The conference’s overarching theme is “China on a New Journey Toward Modernization.”

This year’s conference will be a hybrid of virtual and in-person, although it’s unclear in which capacity Cook will attend. This will not be the first time ‌Tim Cook‌ attends CDF. In 2018, Cook co-chaired the conference, in which he advocated for stronger privacy regulation amid Facebook’s Cambridge Analytica scandal.

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Apple CEO Tim Cook will be one of the 100-plus high-profile CEOs and executives in attendance at this year's China Development Forum (CDF) being held Saturday, March 20 through Monday, March 22, Global Times reports.


The CDF is an annual conference organized and led by the Development Research Center of the State Council, to gather the world's most prominent executives and CEOs to discuss China's economic future and the roadmap of the global economy. BMW's chairman of the management board, Oliver Zipse, will co-chair this year's conference.

According to a description from the state-run outlet Global Times, this year's forum will mark the "first five-year plan for the country (China) to embark on a new journey to fully build a modern socialist country and realize the second centenary goal." The conference's overarching theme is "China on a New Journey Toward Modernization."

This year's conference will be a hybrid of virtual and in-person, although it's unclear in which capacity Cook will attend. This will not be the first time ‌Tim Cook‌ attends CDF. In 2018, Cook co-chaired the conference, in which he advocated for stronger privacy regulation amid Facebook's Cambridge Analytica scandal.
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Tim Cook: 2020 Was Apple’s ‘Top Year of Innovation Ever’

In an interview with He Shijie, a senior at the Beijing University of Posts and Telecommunications, Apple CEO Tim Cook called 2020 Apple’s “top year of innovation ever.”

In 2020, Apple released a number of new products, ranging from the iPhone 12 lineup, to brand new iPads, the Apple Watch Series 6 and SE, and of course, new Apple Silicon Macs. Putting all of that together, ‌Tim Cook‌ says Apple innovated in 2020 more than any other year, but notes that “there’s no formula for innovation.”

Shijie asked Cook about the stress, and process that Apple goes through to release new products every year. The CEO says it’s enabled largely by putting people with diverse skills, backgrounds, and passions together, allowing them to do their lives’ best work, and that “one plus one has always been more than two at Apple.”

What we do is we have a culture of creativity and a culture of collaboration. And these two things together, when they intersect, create enormous innovation. You put people together that have different skills, that look at the world differently, maybe they’re from different places, they have different backgrounds. Some are hardware, some are software. Some are services. Some may be musicians and artists. But you put them all together on a common purpose, to design an incredible product, and it is amazing what can come out of it.

On the new ‌iPhone 12‌ lineup, Cook says Apple’s having “an incredible time with it,” reiterating comments he made at the company’s latest earnings call. Regarding the new ‌Apple Silicon‌ Macs, Cook called the performance of the M1 chip “jaw-dropping,” and that “it screams. It’s so fast.”

Apple’s business in China continues to be a backbone for the company. In Q4 of 2020, ‌iPhone 12‌ sales in the country hit 18 million units, and ‌Tim Cook‌ called the response “phenomenal” earlier last month. Shijie, living in China, asked Cook about whether there are features that are based on customers’ feedback from China. Cook named a few, including iOS 13 dark mode, QR readers, specific keyboards, and 5G.

There’s a ton of features there that are. Whether it’s specific keyboards, whether it’s QR Code mode. 5G in a lot of ways was energized in China because China is so far ahead in the coverage model for 5G. Junction view in Maps because of the complex intersections and so forth. Night mode was another one where the inspiration for Night Mode came from China. And so we listen very carefully to our customers there and wind up creating things based on that, that is then given to the world. We get a lot of feedback from China.

Shijie also brought up the subject of his grandmother, who he notes is having a hard time learning how to use an iPhone. He asks Cook what Apple can do to “give wings to the elderly and to the digital world.”

Well, we try really hard to design our products for everyone. And we try very hard to design the product like the mind works, so you don’t have to have an instruction manual, you can pick it up and it works the way that you would think it would work. We have classes in Apple Retail, where we’d love to train your grandmother on using her ‌iPhone‌ right there in the class. And we have telephone support and so forth for people that need that. But our hope is and our desire is always to design the product in such a way that it works as you would expect it to do, so that no instruction is needed.

The remainder of the interview covers topics such as Cook’s past trips to China and his love for interacting with people, the importance of education and expanding access to it around the world, and advice for people who are still seeking to find the job they love. You can watch the interview with English and Chinese subtitles here.

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In an interview with He Shijie, a senior at the Beijing University of Posts and Telecommunications, Apple CEO Tim Cook called 2020 Apple's "top year of innovation ever."



In 2020, Apple released a number of new products, ranging from the iPhone 12 lineup, to brand new iPads, the Apple Watch Series 6 and SE, and of course, new Apple Silicon Macs. Putting all of that together, ‌Tim Cook‌ says Apple innovated in 2020 more than any other year, but notes that "there's no formula for innovation."

Shijie asked Cook about the stress, and process that Apple goes through to release new products every year. The CEO says it's enabled largely by putting people with diverse skills, backgrounds, and passions together, allowing them to do their lives' best work, and that "one plus one has always been more than two at Apple."

What we do is we have a culture of creativity and a culture of collaboration. And these two things together, when they intersect, create enormous innovation. You put people together that have different skills, that look at the world differently, maybe they're from different places, they have different backgrounds. Some are hardware, some are software. Some are services. Some may be musicians and artists. But you put them all together on a common purpose, to design an incredible product, and it is amazing what can come out of it.


On the new ‌iPhone 12‌ lineup, Cook says Apple's having "an incredible time with it," reiterating comments he made at the company's latest earnings call. Regarding the new ‌Apple Silicon‌ Macs, Cook called the performance of the M1 chip "jaw-dropping," and that "it screams. It's so fast."

Apple's business in China continues to be a backbone for the company. In Q4 of 2020, ‌iPhone 12‌ sales in the country hit 18 million units, and ‌Tim Cook‌ called the response "phenomenal" earlier last month. Shijie, living in China, asked Cook about whether there are features that are based on customers' feedback from China. Cook named a few, including iOS 13 dark mode, QR readers, specific keyboards, and 5G.
There's a ton of features there that are. Whether it's specific keyboards, whether it's QR Code mode. 5G in a lot of ways was energized in China because China is so far ahead in the coverage model for 5G. Junction view in Maps because of the complex intersections and so forth. Night mode was another one where the inspiration for Night Mode came from China. And so we listen very carefully to our customers there and wind up creating things based on that, that is then given to the world. We get a lot of feedback from China.
Shijie also brought up the subject of his grandmother, who he notes is having a hard time learning how to use an iPhone. He asks Cook what Apple can do to "give wings to the elderly and to the digital world."
Well, we try really hard to design our products for everyone. And we try very hard to design the product like the mind works, so you don't have to have an instruction manual, you can pick it up and it works the way that you would think it would work. We have classes in Apple Retail, where we'd love to train your grandmother on using her ‌iPhone‌ right there in the class. And we have telephone support and so forth for people that need that. But our hope is and our desire is always to design the product in such a way that it works as you would expect it to do, so that no instruction is needed.


The remainder of the interview covers topics such as Cook's past trips to China and his love for interacting with people, the importance of education and expanding access to it around the world, and advice for people who are still seeking to find the job they love. You can watch the interview with English and Chinese subtitles here.
This article, "Tim Cook: 2020 Was Apple's 'Top Year of Innovation Ever'" first appeared on MacRumors.com

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iPhone Production in India Reportedly Impacted By Tensions Along Chinese Border

Apple’s iPhone production in India is starting to feel the impact of geopolitical tensions between India and China, due to limitations in the issuances of entrance visas, the South China Morning Post reports.

India and China have been in a state of heightened tension following clashes at the border earlier last year. India has banned a number of Chinese apps, and is now issuing visas to Chinese nationals to enter the country at a slower pace than normal. According to people familiar with the situation, India has been at a near standstill with issuing visas for Chinese engineers, who are needed for Apple suppliers in the country to set up factories or get production underway.

It’s important to note that countries around the world have beefed up border control measures amid the global health crisis. The South China Morning Post fails to address the health crisis as possibly being the reason that India has been slow to issue visas. Either way, however, India’s tight border control does seem to be hindering production.

The news comes following reports this week that Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s government is set to announce a new PLI (performance-linked incentive) scheme to bolster the country’s exports of IT products such as tablets, servers, and PCs. Apple’s reportedly nudging the government to increase the scheme’s budget as it hopes to begin iPad production in the country.

Apple suppliers such as Foxconn and Pegatron have already engaged with the Indian government on past schemes by increasing investment in the country and operating mass production lines for select models of the ‌iPhone‌. This is all part of an overarching push by Apple to de-prioritize China as its main production hub, and instead move to countries such as India or Vietnam.

This article, “iPhone Production in India Reportedly Impacted By Tensions Along Chinese Border” first appeared on MacRumors.com

Discuss this article in our forums

Apple's iPhone production in India is starting to feel the impact of geopolitical tensions between India and China, due to limitations in the issuances of entrance visas, the South China Morning Post reports.



India and China have been in a state of heightened tension following clashes at the border earlier last year. India has banned a number of Chinese apps, and is now issuing visas to Chinese nationals to enter the country at a slower pace than normal. According to people familiar with the situation, India has been at a near standstill with issuing visas for Chinese engineers, who are needed for Apple suppliers in the country to set up factories or get production underway.

It's important to note that countries around the world have beefed up border control measures amid the global health crisis. The South China Morning Post fails to address the health crisis as possibly being the reason that India has been slow to issue visas. Either way, however, India's tight border control does seem to be hindering production.

The news comes following reports this week that Prime Minister Narendra Modi's government is set to announce a new PLI (performance-linked incentive) scheme to bolster the country's exports of IT products such as tablets, servers, and PCs. Apple's reportedly nudging the government to increase the scheme's budget as it hopes to begin iPad production in the country.

Apple suppliers such as Foxconn and Pegatron have already engaged with the Indian government on past schemes by increasing investment in the country and operating mass production lines for select models of the ‌iPhone‌. This is all part of an overarching push by Apple to de-prioritize China as its main production hub, and instead move to countries such as India or Vietnam.
This article, "iPhone Production in India Reportedly Impacted By Tensions Along Chinese Border" first appeared on MacRumors.com

Discuss this article in our forums