Chinese Retailers Slashing iPhone 11 Prices to Entice Reluctant Customers

Multiple third-party resellers in China are offering discounts on the iPhone 11 lineup this week, with savings up to an equivalent of $227 off a high-end iPhone 11 Pro Max, according to the South China Morning Post.


On JD.com, the 64GB version of the basic ‌iPhone 11‌ now costs 4,999 yuan (US$708), 500 yuan (US$70) cheaper than the original price. The more expensive iPhone 11 Pro has an even steeper price cut that shaves off 1,200 yuan (US$170). And the top-tier ‌iPhone 11 Pro Max‌ is selling for a whopping 1,600 yuan (US$227) off.

The savings are likely passed on by Apple in an attempt to bolster demand during a time when consumer confidence and spending is lower, although the company declined to comment on whether it had authorized the price cuts and ‌iPhone 11‌ prices on Apple’s Chinese website have not been reduced.

Chinese resellers offered similar discounts on iPhone XS and iPhone XR models in early 2019, shortly after Apple lowered its revenue guidance for the first quarter of its 2019 fiscal year due to fewer iPhone upgrades than it had anticipated, particularly in the Greater China region.

Related Roundups: iPhone 11, iPhone 11 Pro
Tag: China

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Multiple third-party resellers in China are offering discounts on the iPhone 11 lineup this week, with savings up to an equivalent of $227 off a high-end iPhone 11 Pro Max, according to the South China Morning Post.

On JD.com, the 64GB version of the basic ‌iPhone 11‌ now costs 4,999 yuan (US$708), 500 yuan (US$70) cheaper than the original price. The more expensive iPhone 11 Pro has an even steeper price cut that shaves off 1,200 yuan (US$170). And the top-tier ‌iPhone 11 Pro Max‌ is selling for a whopping 1,600 yuan (US$227) off.
The savings are likely passed on by Apple in an attempt to bolster demand during a time when consumer confidence and spending is lower, although the company declined to comment on whether it had authorized the price cuts and ‌iPhone 11‌ prices on Apple's Chinese website have not been reduced.

Chinese resellers offered similar discounts on iPhone XS and iPhone XR models in early 2019, shortly after Apple lowered its revenue guidance for the first quarter of its 2019 fiscal year due to fewer iPhone upgrades than it had anticipated, particularly in the Greater China region.
Related Roundups: iPhone 11, iPhone 11 Pro
Tag: China

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Apple’s Pandemic Recovery Donation to China More Than Doubles to $7 Million

Apple has more than doubled its donation to China’s virus recovery efforts, Apple CEO Tim Cook announced on Chinese social networking site Weibo today (via Reuters).


Apple has now donated more than 50 million yuan ($7 million) to the country, which will be used to support long-term public health recovery efforts.

China has shown incredible spirit and resilience during the COVID-19 outbreak and we are grateful to our teams, partners and customers for their support during these challenging times. In addition to the 20 million yuan contribution we made with CFPA to support Lei Shen Shan and five other hospitals in the Hubei area, we are supporting longer-term public health recovery efforts. Our total commitment to CFPA is now above 50 million yuan. Around the world, the essential, collaborative response fighting the virus continues, and we are especially grateful to all the medical responders in China, and around the world, who are inspiring us all with their selflessness and courage.

Apple’s stores in China were closed for much of February, but have since reopened. The 42 stores in China are the only Apple Stores in the world that are open right now, as Apple has closed every other retail location in an effort to slow the spread of the virus. Some of the stores are expected to start reopening in April, but on a staggered basis and in areas less impacted by the coronavirus.

Apple has also made extensive donations in the United States and Europe. Last week, Cook announced that Apple has been able to source and donate more than 10 million N95 masks for healthcare workers in the U.S.

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Apple has more than doubled its donation to China's virus recovery efforts, Apple CEO Tim Cook announced on Chinese social networking site Weibo today (via Reuters).


Apple has now donated more than 50 million yuan ($7 million) to the country, which will be used to support long-term public health recovery efforts.
China has shown incredible spirit and resilience during the COVID-19 outbreak and we are grateful to our teams, partners and customers for their support during these challenging times. In addition to the 20 million yuan contribution we made with CFPA to support Lei Shen Shan and five other hospitals in the Hubei area, we are supporting longer-term public health recovery efforts. Our total commitment to CFPA is now above 50 million yuan. Around the world, the essential, collaborative response fighting the virus continues, and we are especially grateful to all the medical responders in China, and around the world, who are inspiring us all with their selflessness and courage.
Apple's stores in China were closed for much of February, but have since reopened. The 42 stores in China are the only Apple Stores in the world that are open right now, as Apple has closed every other retail location in an effort to slow the spread of the virus. Some of the stores are expected to start reopening in April, but on a staggered basis and in areas less impacted by the coronavirus.

Apple has also made extensive donations in the United States and Europe. Last week, Cook announced that Apple has been able to source and donate more than 10 million N95 masks for healthcare workers in the U.S.
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If Chinese smelters don’t turn off the taps, the world could flooded with aluminum

We are not claiming any particular foresight on this, but a recent Reuters article yesterday covers a topic we wrote on last week concerning the disconnect between China’s aluminum smelters, which managed to raise output by 2.4% during the troubled first two months of this year, and the downstream aluminum semi-finished product producers, which all…

The post If Chinese smelters don’t turn off the taps, the world could flooded with aluminum appeared first on Steel, Aluminum, Copper, Stainless, Rare Earth, Metal Prices, Forecasting | MetalMiner.

We are not claiming any particular foresight on this, but a recent Reuters article yesterday covers a topic we wrote on last week concerning the disconnect between China’s aluminum smelters, which managed to raise output by 2.4% during the troubled first two months of this year, and the downstream aluminum semi-finished product producers, which all...

The post If Chinese smelters don’t turn off the taps, the world could flooded with aluminum appeared first on Steel, Aluminum, Copper, Stainless, Rare Earth, Metal Prices, Forecasting | MetalMiner.

All Apple Stores in China Will Be Reopened by Friday

As the coronavirus continues to spread in the United States and other countries, Apple is preparing to reopen its retail stores in mainland China. All 42 locations in the country will be open as of Friday local time, Apple confirmed to Bloomberg‘s Mark Gurman.


Apple started shutting down select stores in China in January, and in early February, closed all stores in China. As the spread of the virus has abated in China, Apple has been reopening stores, and at the end of February, more than half of retail locations in the country were open.

Following the closure of its stores in China, Apple announced that it will not meet its March quarter revenue goals, citing both constrained iPhone supplies worldwide and lower customer demand for Apple products in China.

Government data shared earlier this week suggested Apple sold 60 percent fewer iPhones in China in February 2020 compared to February 2019.

Coronavirus infection numbers and deaths have been steadily declining in China over the course of the last few weeks, and the worst of the outbreak seems to be over.

Apple may soon be facing store closures in the United States as the coronavirus continues to spread. Large events and gatherings have been banned in many states, major sporting events have been canceled, and Disneyland has shut down for the rest of the month. There are more than 1,500 known coronavirus cases in the United States and over 30 people have died.

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As the coronavirus continues to spread in the United States and other countries, Apple is preparing to reopen its retail stores in mainland China. All 42 locations in the country will be open as of Friday local time, Apple confirmed to Bloomberg's Mark Gurman.


Apple started shutting down select stores in China in January, and in early February, closed all stores in China. As the spread of the virus has abated in China, Apple has been reopening stores, and at the end of February, more than half of retail locations in the country were open.

Following the closure of its stores in China, Apple announced that it will not meet its March quarter revenue goals, citing both constrained iPhone supplies worldwide and lower customer demand for Apple products in China.

Government data shared earlier this week suggested Apple sold 60 percent fewer iPhones in China in February 2020 compared to February 2019.

Coronavirus infection numbers and deaths have been steadily declining in China over the course of the last few weeks, and the worst of the outbreak seems to be over.

Apple may soon be facing store closures in the United States as the coronavirus continues to spread. Large events and gatherings have been banned in many states, major sporting events have been canceled, and Disneyland has shut down for the rest of the month. There are more than 1,500 known coronavirus cases in the United States and over 30 people have died.
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iPhone Production Resumption in China Exceeds Foxconn’s Expectations, But US Sales Concerns Remain

The founder of iPhone assembler Foxconn said on Thursday that the resumption of production at its factories in China had “exceeded expectations,” following the coronavirus-related disruption of supply chains (via South China Morning Post).


[Terry Gou Tai-ming] told reporters that the return to work effort at Foxconn’s factories in China had “exceeded our expectations and imagination,” and that supplies to its plants there and in Vietnam had returned to normal.

Foxconn slashed its 2020 revenue outlook after strict quarantines were enforced at its China plants for a period in February to guard against the coronavirus outbreak. The manufacturer went on to suffer its biggest monthly drop in revenue in about seven years because of the containment measures.

The manufacturer had earlier claimed the viral outbreak had had a “fairly small impact” on ‌‌iPhone‌‌ production, suggesting its factories in other countries like Vietnam, India, and Mexico had been able to fill the gap.

China’s coronavirus epidemic has passed its peak, its top health commission said on Thursday. It logged just eight new infections in Hubei province, the first time the epicenter of the outbreak recorded a daily tally of less than 10. Following the slowdown of the spread of the virus, more businesses have reopened in China as authorities ease strict containment measures.

However, for the Taiwan-based company, which is Apple’s main assembler of iPhones, production issues have now been replaced by U.S. sales concerns.

“In the United States, what we are worried about is the market,” said Guo. “If production was resumed quickly but consumers stop spending… that would be key to the economic recovery.”

The Foxconn founder also raised concerns about the electronics supply chain in Japan and South Korea, which are grappling with their own serious outbreaks of the COVID-19 disease. Gou also cited rising prices for RAM chips and supply issues with display panels, but didn’t elaborate.

In China last month, Apple sold fewer than 500,000 iPhones amid the ongoing curbs on travel and transport – a 60 percent slump in ‌iPhone‌ sales compared to the February 2019 quarter.

Apple in mid-February announced that its financial guidance for the March quarter would fall short due to the COVID-19 outbreak. During the January earnings call, Apple said it expected to see revenue of $63 to $67 billion in the March quarter, but that is no longer a goal the company will be able to meet.

Apple cited lower customer demand in China and constrained ‌‌‌iPhone‌‌‌ supplies worldwide as the factors leading to lower than expected revenue.

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The founder of iPhone assembler Foxconn said on Thursday that the resumption of production at its factories in China had "exceeded expectations," following the coronavirus-related disruption of supply chains (via South China Morning Post).

[Terry Gou Tai-ming] told reporters that the return to work effort at Foxconn's factories in China had "exceeded our expectations and imagination," and that supplies to its plants there and in Vietnam had returned to normal.
Foxconn slashed its 2020 revenue outlook after strict quarantines were enforced at its China plants for a period in February to guard against the coronavirus outbreak. The manufacturer went on to suffer its biggest monthly drop in revenue in about seven years because of the containment measures.

The manufacturer had earlier claimed the viral outbreak had had a "fairly small impact" on ‌‌iPhone‌‌ production, suggesting its factories in other countries like Vietnam, India, and Mexico had been able to fill the gap.

China's coronavirus epidemic has passed its peak, its top health commission said on Thursday. It logged just eight new infections in Hubei province, the first time the epicenter of the outbreak recorded a daily tally of less than 10. Following the slowdown of the spread of the virus, more businesses have reopened in China as authorities ease strict containment measures.

However, for the Taiwan-based company, which is Apple's main assembler of iPhones, production issues have now been replaced by U.S. sales concerns.
"In the United States, what we are worried about is the market," said Guo. "If production was resumed quickly but consumers stop spending... that would be key to the economic recovery."
The Foxconn founder also raised concerns about the electronics supply chain in Japan and South Korea, which are grappling with their own serious outbreaks of the COVID-19 disease. Gou also cited rising prices for RAM chips and supply issues with display panels, but didn't elaborate.

In China last month, Apple sold fewer than 500,000 iPhones amid the ongoing curbs on travel and transport – a 60 percent slump in ‌iPhone‌ sales compared to the February 2019 quarter.

Apple in mid-February announced that its financial guidance for the March quarter would fall short due to the COVID-19 outbreak. During the January earnings call, Apple said it expected to see revenue of $63 to $67 billion in the March quarter, but that is no longer a goal the company will be able to meet.

Apple cited lower customer demand in China and constrained ‌‌‌iPhone‌‌‌ supplies worldwide as the factors leading to lower than expected revenue.
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iPad Stocks in China Dwindle as Kids Switch to E-Learning Amid Coronavirus-Related School Closures

iPad stocks are reportedly running low in China because parents are buying them to help with e-learning at home in response to school closures relating to the coronavirus outbreak.


Nikkei Asian Review today reports that labor shortages have also seen suppliers struggle to meet production demands, amid government-imposed restrictions in an attempt to curb the spread of the virus.

“Later the need surged even higher when China opened schools but asked students to take the courses online,” one person familiar with the situation said. “The shortage of the ‌iPad‌ range is up to four weeks of waiting, especially for the cheaper models. The supply could not meet the pace of the demand at all.”

Today, Apple’s regional online store for China shows a three to four week delivery time for orders of the low-cost 10.2-inch ‌iPad‌, while anyone ordering a 12.9-inch iPad Pro will have a wait of up to two weeks.

Demand is said to have been rising since January when Beijing imposed quarantine measures. One source told Nikkei that Apple recently ordered a 20 percent increase in production of iPads for the first half of this year, compared with the production forecast it gave suppliers in January, prior to the outbreak.

In Wuhan, where the outbreak began, schools are closed, and children have been using an Alibaba-owned corporate app called DingTalk to attend classes remotely. At least 50 million students are reportedly now taking classes online using the app, which would go a long way to explaining the strong demand for iPads.

Typically this would be positive news for Apple, but with suppliers severely affected by the spread of the coronavirus, the company has been unable to keep ‌iPad‌ stocks plentiful. Conversely, Apple has been unable to match 2019’s iPhone sales figures across China, with fewer than 500,000 iPhones sold last month amid the ongoing curbs on travel and transport, according to government data.

Apple told investors in February that it wouldn’t meet its revenue guidance for the quarter because of the impact from the epidemic.

The company closed all 42 of its retail stores in China at the beginning of February as the outbreak worsened, but most of the stores have re-opened, although many are operating with shortened hours. New infections and deaths reported in China have steadily declined in recent weeks, suggesting the enforced movement restrictions are having an impact on the spread of the disease.

This article, “iPad Stocks in China Dwindle as Kids Switch to E-Learning Amid Coronavirus-Related School Closures” first appeared on MacRumors.com

Discuss this article in our forums

iPad stocks are reportedly running low in China because parents are buying them to help with e-learning at home in response to school closures relating to the coronavirus outbreak.


Nikkei Asian Review today reports that labor shortages have also seen suppliers struggle to meet production demands, amid government-imposed restrictions in an attempt to curb the spread of the virus.
"Later the need surged even higher when China opened schools but asked students to take the courses online," one person familiar with the situation said. "The shortage of the ‌iPad‌ range is up to four weeks of waiting, especially for the cheaper models. The supply could not meet the pace of the demand at all."
Today, Apple's regional online store for China shows a three to four week delivery time for orders of the low-cost 10.2-inch ‌iPad‌, while anyone ordering a 12.9-inch iPad Pro will have a wait of up to two weeks.

Demand is said to have been rising since January when Beijing imposed quarantine measures. One source told Nikkei that Apple recently ordered a 20 percent increase in production of iPads for the first half of this year, compared with the production forecast it gave suppliers in January, prior to the outbreak.

In Wuhan, where the outbreak began, schools are closed, and children have been using an Alibaba-owned corporate app called DingTalk to attend classes remotely. At least 50 million students are reportedly now taking classes online using the app, which would go a long way to explaining the strong demand for iPads.

Typically this would be positive news for Apple, but with suppliers severely affected by the spread of the coronavirus, the company has been unable to keep ‌iPad‌ stocks plentiful. Conversely, Apple has been unable to match 2019's iPhone sales figures across China, with fewer than 500,000 iPhones sold last month amid the ongoing curbs on travel and transport, according to government data.

Apple told investors in February that it wouldn't meet its revenue guidance for the quarter because of the impact from the epidemic.

The company closed all 42 of its retail stores in China at the beginning of February as the outbreak worsened, but most of the stores have re-opened, although many are operating with shortened hours. New infections and deaths reported in China have steadily declined in recent weeks, suggesting the enforced movement restrictions are having an impact on the spread of the disease.
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Is China recovering from the impact of the coronavirus?

Falling infection rates to the lowest level since January and President Xi Jinping’s visit to Wuhan yesterday suggest all is returning to normal in China. Some are looking for a V-shaped bounce back and maybe even a softer hit to Q1 GDP growth than previously feared. Looking for metal price forecasting and data analysis in…

The post Is China recovering from the impact of the coronavirus? appeared first on Steel, Aluminum, Copper, Stainless, Rare Earth, Metal Prices, Forecasting | MetalMiner.

Falling infection rates to the lowest level since January and President Xi Jinping’s visit to Wuhan yesterday suggest all is returning to normal in China. Some are looking for a V-shaped bounce back and maybe even a softer hit to Q1 GDP growth than previously feared. Looking for metal price forecasting and data analysis in...

The post Is China recovering from the impact of the coronavirus? appeared first on Steel, Aluminum, Copper, Stainless, Rare Earth, Metal Prices, Forecasting | MetalMiner.

Apple Sold 60 Percent Fewer iPhones in China Last Month Compared to February 2019 Amid Coronavirus Restrictions

Apple sold fewer than 500,000 iPhones in China last month amid the ongoing curbs on travel and transport, according to government data shared on Monday (via Reuters).


Shipments of Apple devices slumped to 494,000, from 1.27 million in February 2019. In January, their shipments had held steady at just over 2 million.

That amounts to an almost 60 percent slump in iPhone sales – worse than IDC’s forecasted drop in overall smartphone sales of roughly 40 percent in the first quarter due to the impact of coronavirus.

China’s restrictions on public movement were enforced in late January just ahead of the Lunar New Year Festival and remained in place throughout most of February, which appears to have crippled demand for smartphones.

According to data from the China Academy of Information and Communications Technology, mobile phone brands shipped a total of 6.34 million devices in February, down 55 percent from 14 million sold in February 2019.

Android brands like Huawei and Xiaomi suffered the worst, with shipments collectively declining from 12.72 million units in February 2019 to 5.85 million.

Apple closed all 42 of its retail stores in China at the beginning of February as the outbreak in China worsened, but most of the stores have re-opened, albeit operating with shortened hours. New infections and deaths reported in China have been declining in recent weeks, according to government data, suggesting the virus may have peaked there.

Apple in mid-February announced that its financial guidance for the March quarter would fall short due to the COVID-19 outbreak. During the January earnings call, Apple said it expected to see revenue of $63 to $67 billion in the March quarter, but that is no longer a goal the company will be able to meet.

Apple cited lower customer demand in China and constrained ‌‌iPhone‌‌ supplies worldwide as the factors leading to lower than expected revenue.

This article, “Apple Sold 60 Percent Fewer iPhones in China Last Month Compared to February 2019 Amid Coronavirus Restrictions” first appeared on MacRumors.com

Discuss this article in our forums

Apple sold fewer than 500,000 iPhones in China last month amid the ongoing curbs on travel and transport, according to government data shared on Monday (via Reuters).

Shipments of Apple devices slumped to 494,000, from 1.27 million in February 2019. In January, their shipments had held steady at just over 2 million.
That amounts to an almost 60 percent slump in iPhone sales – worse than IDC's forecasted drop in overall smartphone sales of roughly 40 percent in the first quarter due to the impact of coronavirus.

China's restrictions on public movement were enforced in late January just ahead of the Lunar New Year Festival and remained in place throughout most of February, which appears to have crippled demand for smartphones.

According to data from the China Academy of Information and Communications Technology, mobile phone brands shipped a total of 6.34 million devices in February, down 55 percent from 14 million sold in February 2019.

Android brands like Huawei and Xiaomi suffered the worst, with shipments collectively declining from 12.72 million units in February 2019 to 5.85 million.

Apple closed all 42 of its retail stores in China at the beginning of February as the outbreak in China worsened, but most of the stores have re-opened, albeit operating with shortened hours. New infections and deaths reported in China have been declining in recent weeks, according to government data, suggesting the virus may have peaked there.

Apple in mid-February announced that its financial guidance for the March quarter would fall short due to the COVID-19 outbreak. During the January earnings call, Apple said it expected to see revenue of $63 to $67 billion in the March quarter, but that is no longer a goal the company will be able to meet.

Apple cited lower customer demand in China and constrained ‌‌iPhone‌‌ supplies worldwide as the factors leading to lower than expected revenue.


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China logistics face challenges on the heels of coronavirus lockdowns

Manufacturers are increasingly questioning whether their supply chain is likely to be exposed to disruption from the coronavirus outbreak ravaging China. Request a 30-minute demo of the MetalMiner Insights platform now. Even if your company does not so…

Manufacturers are increasingly questioning whether their supply chain is likely to be exposed to disruption from the coronavirus outbreak ravaging China. Request a 30-minute demo of the MetalMiner Insights platform now. Even if your company does not source product directly from China, many companies are still predicting supply chain disruption as the raw materials used...

The post China logistics face challenges on the heels of coronavirus lockdowns appeared first on Steel, Aluminum, Copper, Stainless, Rare Earth, Metal Prices, Forecasting | MetalMiner.

China’s steel industry under growing pressure from record inventories

As if the social cost of the coronavirus Covid-19 were not bad enough, some sectors of China’s industrial economy are suffering growing pain despite a supposed return to work last week. MetalMiner’s monthly buying outlook reports give you pricing and specific buying strategies for 10 metal types. Request your trial now. The property sector, which…

The post China’s steel industry under growing pressure from record inventories appeared first on Steel, Aluminum, Copper, Stainless, Rare Earth, Metal Prices, Forecasting | MetalMiner.

As if the social cost of the coronavirus Covid-19 were not bad enough, some sectors of China’s industrial economy are suffering growing pain despite a supposed return to work last week. MetalMiner’s monthly buying outlook reports give you pricing and specific buying strategies for 10 metal types. Request your trial now. The property sector, which...

The post China’s steel industry under growing pressure from record inventories appeared first on Steel, Aluminum, Copper, Stainless, Rare Earth, Metal Prices, Forecasting | MetalMiner.