Germany pledges $65M toward new ArcelorMittal DRI plant

Germany’s federal environment minister has pledged €55 million ($65 million) towards ArcelorMittal Hamburg’s planned construction of a demonstrator directed reduced iron (DRI) plant, which will eventually use green hydrogen, the Luxembourg-headquartered group stated. Svenja Schulze pledged the government’s support Sept. 7 while visiting the Hamburg plant, ArcelorMittal noted. Do you know which market conditions are…

The post Germany pledges $65M toward new ArcelorMittal DRI plant appeared first on Steel, Aluminum, Copper, Stainless, Rare Earth, Metal Prices, Forecasting | MetalMiner.

Germany’s federal environment minister has pledged €55 million ($65 million) towards ArcelorMittal Hamburg’s planned construction of a demonstrator directed reduced iron (DRI) plant, which will eventually use green hydrogen, the Luxembourg-headquartered group stated. Svenja Schulze pledged the government’s support Sept. 7 while visiting the Hamburg plant, ArcelorMittal noted. Do you know which market conditions are...

The post Germany pledges $65M toward new ArcelorMittal DRI plant appeared first on Steel, Aluminum, Copper, Stainless, Rare Earth, Metal Prices, Forecasting | MetalMiner.

Germany Urges EU to Require 7 Years of Updates and Repairs for iOS Devices

Smartphone makers like Apple and Google should be required to provide security updates and spare parts for their mobile devices for at least seven years, according to new environmental responsibility proposals from the German government to the European Union (via Heise Online).



The European Commission recently proposed that mobile device manufacturers should provide software updates and spare parts for five years, with tablet spare parts available for six years. It also wants to force manufacturers to publish the prices of the spare parts and ensure they don’t increase, and deliver said parts in no more than five working days.

However, Germany wants the EU to go further by demanding seven years of updates and spare parts availability. In addition, it wants manufacturers to offer spare parts at “a reasonable price,” and faster delivery of spare parts, a point it wishes to discuss further with the Commission.

The German government also supports the European Commission’s push to introduce ecodesign rules, including an energy label and a repairability index for smartphones and tablets. The production of the equipment accounts for the majority of greenhouse gas emissions, according to the EC, and only part of the raw materials can be recovered during recycling.

The DigitalEurope Industry Association, representing manufacturers including Apple, Samsung, and Huawei, believe the Commission’s proposals go too far, and have suggested that makers provide security updates for three years and OS updates for two years.

The association also believes that it should only be required to offer replacement batteries and displays to consumers, since these parts have the highest failure rate. In contrast, components like camera sensors, microphones, and connectors “rarely fail,” and therefore should not come under the mandate.

Following additional negotiations between all parties involved, the European Union plans to introduce the proposals by 2023.

Apple has often been criticized for disproportionate repair prices, such as the $79 fee to service the $99 HomePod mini, as well as arbitrary limits on repairs, such as barring repair of the iPhone 12‘s camera without access to Apple’s proprietary cloud-linked System Configuration app.

The European Parliament last year voted to support the recommendations of the EU Committee on the “Right to Repair,” including a system of mandatory labelling on consumer electronics to provide explicit information on the repairability and lifespan of products.

This article, “Germany Urges EU to Require 7 Years of Updates and Repairs for iOS Devices” first appeared on MacRumors.com

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Smartphone makers like Apple and Google should be required to provide security updates and spare parts for their mobile devices for at least seven years, according to new environmental responsibility proposals from the German government to the European Union (via Heise Online).


The European Commission recently proposed that mobile device manufacturers should provide software updates and spare parts for five years, with tablet spare parts available for six years. It also wants to force manufacturers to publish the prices of the spare parts and ensure they don't increase, and deliver said parts in no more than five working days.

However, Germany wants the EU to go further by demanding seven years of updates and spare parts availability. In addition, it wants manufacturers to offer spare parts at "a reasonable price," and faster delivery of spare parts, a point it wishes to discuss further with the Commission.

The German government also supports the European Commission's push to introduce ecodesign rules, including an energy label and a repairability index for smartphones and tablets. The production of the equipment accounts for the majority of greenhouse gas emissions, according to the EC, and only part of the raw materials can be recovered during recycling.

The DigitalEurope Industry Association, representing manufacturers including Apple, Samsung, and Huawei, believe the Commission's proposals go too far, and have suggested that makers provide security updates for three years and OS updates for two years.

The association also believes that it should only be required to offer replacement batteries and displays to consumers, since these parts have the highest failure rate. In contrast, components like camera sensors, microphones, and connectors "rarely fail," and therefore should not come under the mandate.

Following additional negotiations between all parties involved, the European Union plans to introduce the proposals by 2023.

Apple has often been criticized for disproportionate repair prices, such as the $79 fee to service the $99 HomePod mini, as well as arbitrary limits on repairs, such as barring repair of the iPhone 12's camera without access to Apple's proprietary cloud-linked System Configuration app.

The European Parliament last year voted to support the recommendations of the EU Committee on the "Right to Repair," including a system of mandatory labelling on consumer electronics to provide explicit information on the repairability and lifespan of products.
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German Politician Asks Apple CEO Tim Cook to Abandon CSAM Scanning Plans

Member of the German parliament, Manuel Höferlin, who serves as the chairman of the Digital Agenda committee in Germany, has penned a letter to Apple CEO Tim Cook, pleading Apple to abandon its plan to scan iPhone users’ photo libraries for CSAM (child sexual abuse material) images later this year.



In the two-page letter (via iFun), Höferlin said that he first applauds Apple’s efforts to address the dangers posed by child sexual abuse and violence but notes that he believes Apple’s approach to remedying the issue is not the right one. Höferlin continued to say that the approach Apple has chosen violates one of the “most important principles of the modern information society – secure and confidential communication.”

The approach chosen by Apple however – namely CSAM scanning of end devices – is a dangerous one. Regardless of how noble your motives may be, you are embarking on a path that is very risky – not only for your own company. On the contrary, you would also be damaging one of the most important principles of the modern information society – secure and confidential communication. The price for this will most likely be paid not only by Apple, but by all of us.

Höferlin notably called Apple’s CSAM approach “the biggest opening of the floodgates for communication confidentiality since the birth of the internet.” The letter speaks out against Apple’s plans to scan images in a users’ iCloud Photo Library for CSAM by checking the hashes of images to a database of known child sexual abuse material.

That feature is entirely different from another feature rolling out later this year, in which iOS will use on-device image analysis to detect possible sexually explicit images in the Messages app and asks users under the age of 13 if they wish to see the photo. While Höferlin referenced some legitimate concerns over CSAM scanning, he continued that the feature destroys “some of the trust users place in not having their communications secretly monitored.” Neither CSAM scanning nor the Child Safety Features in Message, however, are monitoring any communication.

Apple’s senior vice president of software engineering, Craig Federighi, admitted in a recent interview that the conjoined announcement of CSAM detection and improved safety for children within the Messages app has caused confusion. Nonetheless, Höferlin continued in his letter by stating that while he wishes he could believe Apple’s reassurance that it will not allow government interference into CSAM detection, he is unable to take the company by its word.

As much as I want to believe your assurances that you will reject all requests for further application of this function, such as the location of regime critics or surveillance of minorities, these lack credibility. In every country on Earth – even in my home country, despite our historical experiences – political forces continue to coalesce for whom confidential communication and encryption are a thorn in their side, and who are engaged in ongoing efforts to replace freedom with surveillance. For people who unlike us are not lucky enough to live in Western democracies, this can in the worst-case scenario mean a genuine threat to their lives.

Höferlin concluded his letter by pleading with Cook for Apple to abandon its CSAM scanning plans and asked that the company stays on the side of free and private internet.

That is why my urgent appeal to you is that you abandon your plans for CSAM scanning. This would not only save your own company from many foreseeable problems, but would also protect the Achilles’ heel of the modern information society! Please stay on the side of those who defend civilization’s achievement of a free internet!

Since its announcement earlier this month, Apple’s plans have received criticism, and in response, the company has continued its attempt to address concerns by publishing additional documents and an FAQ page. CSAM scanning and Child Safety Features within the Messages app are still on track to be released later this year.

This article, “German Politician Asks Apple CEO Tim Cook to Abandon CSAM Scanning Plans” first appeared on MacRumors.com

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Member of the German parliament, Manuel Höferlin, who serves as the chairman of the Digital Agenda committee in Germany, has penned a letter to Apple CEO Tim Cook, pleading Apple to abandon its plan to scan iPhone users' photo libraries for CSAM (child sexual abuse material) images later this year.


In the two-page letter (via iFun), Höferlin said that he first applauds Apple's efforts to address the dangers posed by child sexual abuse and violence but notes that he believes Apple's approach to remedying the issue is not the right one. Höferlin continued to say that the approach Apple has chosen violates one of the "most important principles of the modern information society – secure and confidential communication."
The approach chosen by Apple however – namely CSAM scanning of end devices – is a dangerous one. Regardless of how noble your motives may be, you are embarking on a path that is very risky – not only for your own company. On the contrary, you would also be damaging one of the most important principles of the modern information society – secure and confidential communication. The price for this will most likely be paid not only by Apple, but by all of us.
Höferlin notably called Apple's CSAM approach "the biggest opening of the floodgates for communication confidentiality since the birth of the internet." The letter speaks out against Apple's plans to scan images in a users' iCloud Photo Library for CSAM by checking the hashes of images to a database of known child sexual abuse material.

That feature is entirely different from another feature rolling out later this year, in which iOS will use on-device image analysis to detect possible sexually explicit images in the Messages app and asks users under the age of 13 if they wish to see the photo. While Höferlin referenced some legitimate concerns over CSAM scanning, he continued that the feature destroys "some of the trust users place in not having their communications secretly monitored." Neither CSAM scanning nor the Child Safety Features in Message, however, are monitoring any communication.

Apple's senior vice president of software engineering, Craig Federighi, admitted in a recent interview that the conjoined announcement of CSAM detection and improved safety for children within the Messages app has caused confusion. Nonetheless, Höferlin continued in his letter by stating that while he wishes he could believe Apple's reassurance that it will not allow government interference into CSAM detection, he is unable to take the company by its word.
As much as I want to believe your assurances that you will reject all requests for further application of this function, such as the location of regime critics or surveillance of minorities, these lack credibility. In every country on Earth – even in my home country, despite our historical experiences – political forces continue to coalesce for whom confidential communication and encryption are a thorn in their side, and who are engaged in ongoing efforts to replace freedom with surveillance. For people who unlike us are not lucky enough to live in Western democracies, this can in the worst-case scenario mean a genuine threat to their lives.
Höferlin concluded his letter by pleading with Cook for Apple to abandon its CSAM scanning plans and asked that the company stays on the side of free and private internet.
That is why my urgent appeal to you is that you abandon your plans for CSAM scanning. This would not only save your own company from many foreseeable problems, but would also protect the Achilles' heel of the modern information society! Please stay on the side of those who defend civilization’s achievement of a free internet!
Since its announcement earlier this month, Apple’s plans have received criticism, and in response, the company has continued its attempt to address concerns by publishing additional documents and an FAQ page. CSAM scanning and Child Safety Features within the Messages app are still on track to be released later this year.
This article, "German Politician Asks Apple CEO Tim Cook to Abandon CSAM Scanning Plans" first appeared on MacRumors.com

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Apple Faces Antitrust Probe Into Pre-Installed Apps, App Store, and More in Germany

Germany’s Federal Cartel Office, the Bundeskartellamt, today initiated proceedings against Apple on the claims of anti-competitive behavior related to the App Store, its products, and other services, according to a press release.



The proceeding against Apple announced today will determine whether the Cupertino tech giant holds a “paramount significance across markets” and whether, through its ecosystem, Apple holds enough power to make it difficult for “other companies” to challenge it.

Andreas Mundt, president of Bundeskartellamt, issued the following statement on the initial proceedings:

We will now examine whether with its proprietary operating system iOS, Apple has created a digital ecosystem around its iPhone that extends across several markets. Apple produces tablets, computers and wearables and provides a host of device-related services. In addition to manufacturing various hardware products, the tech company also offers the ‌App Store‌, iCloud, AppleCare, Apple Music, Apple Arcade, Apple TV+ as well as other services as part of its services business. Besides assessing the company’s position in these areas, we will, among other aspects, examine its extensive integration across several market levels, the magnitude of its technological and financial resources and its access to data. A main focus of the investigations will be on the operation of the ‌App Store‌ as it enables Apple in many ways to influence the business activities of third parties.

The press release is short on specifics on what the outcome of its investigation may lead to; however, the office says that if it determines a company to be of importance across markets, it may prohibit that company from “engaging in anti-competitive practices.”

The office says it has received “various complaints relating to potentially anti-competitive practices,” particularly related to the recent rollout of ATT or the App Tracking Transparency framework. In April, nine industry associations representing companies like Facebook and publisher Axel Springer filed an antitrust complaint to the federal office, claiming that Apple’s ATT framework will severely hurt publishers and their bottom lines, deeming it a threat to their business.

According to the press release, another complaint that the office received related to the pre-installation of Apple’s own apps on its devices. The office directly references section 19a of the German Competition Act, which states “the abuse of a dominant position by one or several undertakings is prohibited” as a potential clause that Apple may be violating.

Russia recently took the first major step against Apple for the pre-installation of its own apps, requiring the company to show users a screen to download government-approved apps during initial device setup. Similar legislation being proposed in the U.S. Congress would require Apple to give users the ability to delete all pre-installed Apple apps, instead of a select handful that users may currently delete.

The Bundeskartellamt also lists ongoing disputes regarding Apple’s in-app purchasing system, which gives the tech giant a 30% commission of all purchases made and the restriction that apps may only be distributed on Apple devices through the company’s ‌App Store‌ and not other third-party app marketplaces.

This article, “Apple Faces Antitrust Probe Into Pre-Installed Apps, App Store, and More in Germany” first appeared on MacRumors.com

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Germany's Federal Cartel Office, the Bundeskartellamt, today initiated proceedings against Apple on the claims of anti-competitive behavior related to the App Store, its products, and other services, according to a press release.


The proceeding against Apple announced today will determine whether the Cupertino tech giant holds a "paramount significance across markets" and whether, through its ecosystem, Apple holds enough power to make it difficult for "other companies" to challenge it.

Andreas Mundt, president of Bundeskartellamt, issued the following statement on the initial proceedings:
We will now examine whether with its proprietary operating system iOS, Apple has created a digital ecosystem around its iPhone that extends across several markets. Apple produces tablets, computers and wearables and provides a host of device-related services. In addition to manufacturing various hardware products, the tech company also offers the ‌App Store‌, iCloud, AppleCare, Apple Music, Apple Arcade, Apple TV+ as well as other services as part of its services business. Besides assessing the company’s position in these areas, we will, among other aspects, examine its extensive integration across several market levels, the magnitude of its technological and financial resources and its access to data. A main focus of the investigations will be on the operation of the ‌App Store‌ as it enables Apple in many ways to influence the business activities of third parties.
The press release is short on specifics on what the outcome of its investigation may lead to; however, the office says that if it determines a company to be of importance across markets, it may prohibit that company from "engaging in anti-competitive practices."

The office says it has received "various complaints relating to potentially anti-competitive practices," particularly related to the recent rollout of ATT or the App Tracking Transparency framework. In April, nine industry associations representing companies like Facebook and publisher Axel Springer filed an antitrust complaint to the federal office, claiming that Apple's ATT framework will severely hurt publishers and their bottom lines, deeming it a threat to their business.

According to the press release, another complaint that the office received related to the pre-installation of Apple's own apps on its devices. The office directly references section 19a of the German Competition Act, which states "the abuse of a dominant position by one or several undertakings is prohibited" as a potential clause that Apple may be violating.

Russia recently took the first major step against Apple for the pre-installation of its own apps, requiring the company to show users a screen to download government-approved apps during initial device setup. Similar legislation being proposed in the U.S. Congress would require Apple to give users the ability to delete all pre-installed Apple apps, instead of a select handful that users may currently delete.

The Bundeskartellamt also lists ongoing disputes regarding Apple's in-app purchasing system, which gives the tech giant a 30% commission of all purchases made and the restriction that apps may only be distributed on Apple devices through the company's ‌App Store‌ and not other third-party app marketplaces.
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German Regulators Seek to Stop WhatsApp Sharing Data With Facebook

Regulators in Germany are seeking to bar Facebook from collecting user data from its subsidiary, WhatsApp (via Bloomberg).


The Hamburg regulator is looking to achieve an “immediately enforceable order” against Facebook by May 15, due to concerns that WhatsApp’s privacy policy changes could lead to the unlawful use of user data for marketing and advertising purposes. Data Commissioner Johannes Caspar said in a statement earlier today:

WhatsApp is now used by almost 60 million people in Germany and is by far the most widely used social media application, even ahead of Facebook. It is therefore all the more important to ensure that the high number of users, which makes the service attractive to many people, does not lead to an abusive exploitation of data power.

The privacy policy changes suggested at the time that WhatsApp would share additional data with Facebook such as phone number, service-related information, IP address, and transaction data, but WhatsApp has since made it clear that the update does not affect data sharing with Facebook in terms of user chats or profile information, with the new terms instead applying to those who use the business chat feature.

WhatsApp delayed the introduction of its new privacy policy earlier this year after confusion and user backlash forced the company to assure users of its commitment to privacy. Nevertheless, the relationship between Facebook and WhatsApp is set to come under greater scrutiny in Germany as a result of the request for an enforceable order.

Up to now there has been no supervisory review of the actual processing operations between WhatsApp and Facebook that we are aware of. There is reason to believe that the provisions that will enable and expand the sharing of data between WhatsApp and Facebook will be unlawfully enforced due to the lack of voluntary and informed consent.

Facebook said in a statement that it is reviewing the information it has received from the Hamburg regulator and “will address their misunderstandings around the purpose and effect of the update.” The company added that it remains “committed to delivering secure and private communications for everyone.

To be clear, by accepting WhatsApp’s updated terms of service, users are not agreeing to any expansion in our ability to share data with Facebook, and the update does not impact the privacy of their messages with friends or family wherever they are in the world.

WhatsApp has in fact shared some user information with Facebook since 2016, such as phone number, but chat messages and phone calls remain private and protected with end-to-end encryption.

The formal case has been opened “to prevent unlawful mass data sharing, if necessary, and to put an end to unlawful consent pressure on millions of people.” Facebook get will the opportunity to respond to the allegations at a hearing before mid-May.

This article, “German Regulators Seek to Stop WhatsApp Sharing Data With Facebook” first appeared on MacRumors.com

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Regulators in Germany are seeking to bar Facebook from collecting user data from its subsidiary, WhatsApp (via Bloomberg).


The Hamburg regulator is looking to achieve an "immediately enforceable order" against Facebook by May 15, due to concerns that WhatsApp's privacy policy changes could lead to the unlawful use of user data for marketing and advertising purposes. Data Commissioner Johannes Caspar said in a statement earlier today:
WhatsApp is now used by almost 60 million people in Germany and is by far the most widely used social media application, even ahead of Facebook. It is therefore all the more important to ensure that the high number of users, which makes the service attractive to many people, does not lead to an abusive exploitation of data power.
The privacy policy changes suggested at the time that WhatsApp would share additional data with Facebook such as phone number, service-related information, IP address, and transaction data, but WhatsApp has since made it clear that the update does not affect data sharing with Facebook in terms of user chats or profile information, with the new terms instead applying to those who use the business chat feature.

WhatsApp delayed the introduction of its new privacy policy earlier this year after confusion and user backlash forced the company to assure users of its commitment to privacy. Nevertheless, the relationship between Facebook and WhatsApp is set to come under greater scrutiny in Germany as a result of the request for an enforceable order.
Up to now there has been no supervisory review of the actual processing operations between WhatsApp and Facebook that we are aware of. There is reason to believe that the provisions that will enable and expand the sharing of data between WhatsApp and Facebook will be unlawfully enforced due to the lack of voluntary and informed consent.


Facebook said in a statement that it is reviewing the information it has received from the Hamburg regulator and "will address their misunderstandings around the purpose and effect of the update." The company added that it remains "committed to delivering secure and private communications for everyone.
To be clear, by accepting WhatsApp's updated terms of service, users are not agreeing to any expansion in our ability to share data with Facebook, and the update does not impact the privacy of their messages with friends or family wherever they are in the world.
WhatsApp has in fact shared some user information with Facebook since 2016, such as phone number, but chat messages and phone calls remain private and protected with end-to-end encryption.

The formal case has been opened "to prevent unlawful mass data sharing, if necessary, and to put an end to unlawful consent pressure on millions of people." Facebook get will the opportunity to respond to the allegations at a hearing before mid-May.
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Work Continues on Apple’s Second Berlin Store in Eastern Part of German Capital

While the German cities of Cologne, Hamburg, Munich, and Frankfurt have more than one Apple Store, the capital Berlin has only one – Apple Kurfürstendamm, which opened in 2013. That looks set to change soon, however.

Render of 43-45 Rosenthaler Straße by project developer Values Real Estate

Speculation that Apple could settle in the eastern part of Germany’s largest city has been around for several years, but recent construction work at a site in the Mitte district purchased by project developers Values Real Estate has offered up concrete evidence to indicate the exact location of Apple’s second Berlin store.


iFun.de reports that Apple is preparing a second store in the eastern part of Berlin, at 43-45 Rosenthaler Straße. Values Real Estate announced in 2018 that it would tear down several old GDR buildings in Rosenthaler Straße and create a new three-part building, with office, residential and business shares in the vacant space.

The construction site is close to the Spree river, within walking distance of Alexanderplatz, and was recently covered in the kind of black wood paneling that Apple has used before. The large glass fronts that extend from the ground floor to the second floor of the neighboring buildings are clearly reminiscent of Apple’s store aesthetics.


Photos depict the recess in the large glass front above the entrance door that’s needed to install the luminous Apple logo. Other shots suggest that while construction is progressing, the opening of the store is likely months away yet.

This article, “Work Continues on Apple’s Second Berlin Store in Eastern Part of German Capital” first appeared on MacRumors.com

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While the German cities of Cologne, Hamburg, Munich, and Frankfurt have more than one Apple Store, the capital Berlin has only one – Apple Kurfürstendamm, which opened in 2013. That looks set to change soon, however.

Render of 43-45 Rosenthaler Straße by project developer Values Real Estate

Speculation that Apple could settle in the eastern part of Germany's largest city has been around for several years, but recent construction work at a site in the Mitte district purchased by project developers Values Real Estate has offered up concrete evidence to indicate the exact location of Apple's second Berlin store.


iFun.de reports that Apple is preparing a second store in the eastern part of Berlin, at 43-45 Rosenthaler Straße. Values Real Estate announced in 2018 that it would tear down several old GDR buildings in Rosenthaler Straße and create a new three-part building, with office, residential and business shares in the vacant space.

The construction site is close to the Spree river, within walking distance of Alexanderplatz, and was recently covered in the kind of black wood paneling that Apple has used before. The large glass fronts that extend from the ground floor to the second floor of the neighboring buildings are clearly reminiscent of Apple's store aesthetics.


Photos depict the recess in the large glass front above the entrance door that's needed to install the luminous Apple logo. Other shots suggest that while construction is progressing, the opening of the store is likely months away yet.
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Apple to Invest Over 1 Billion Euros in Munich Silicon Design Center

Apple will make Munich its European Silicon Design Center, the company announced today. Work already being undertaken by Apple in Bavaria’s capital is contributing to its custom Apple silicon designs, while the expansion, together with additional investment in R&D, will exceed 1 billion euros in the next three years.


Apple says the new state-of-the-art facility will bring hundreds of new jobs to the area, which is already Apple’s largest engineering hub in Europe, with around 1,500 engineers from 40 countries working in a variety of areas including power management design and application processors. The new facility will house employees who will focus on connectivity and wireless technologies.

“I couldn’t be more excited for everything our Munich engineering teams will discover — from exploring the new frontiers of 5G technology, to a new generation of technologies that bring power, speed, and connectivity to the world,” said Tim Cook, Apple’s CEO. “Munich has been a home to Apple for four decades, and we’re grateful to this community and to Germany for being a part of our journey.”

The new, 30,000-square-meter facility is located in central Munich’s Karlstrasse, and will be home to Apple’s growing cellular unit, Europe’s largest R&D site for mobile wireless semiconductors and software. Teams there will create 5G and future technologies, and focus on developing, integrating, and optimizing wireless modems for Apple products.

Apple plans to start moving into the new building in late 2022, and like all Apple offices globally, it will run entirely on 100 percent renewable energy.

Apple says it has spent over 15 billion euros with more than 700 companies of all sizes across Germany. This includes the chip manufacturer Infineon, battery company Varta, and the family-owned chemical company DELO, which is delivering resin for Face ID technology in products like the iPhone 12.

This article, “Apple to Invest Over 1 Billion Euros in Munich Silicon Design Center” first appeared on MacRumors.com

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Apple will make Munich its European Silicon Design Center, the company announced today. Work already being undertaken by Apple in Bavaria's capital is contributing to its custom Apple silicon designs, while the expansion, together with additional investment in R&D, will exceed 1 billion euros in the next three years.


Apple says the new state-of-the-art facility will bring hundreds of new jobs to the area, which is already Apple's largest engineering hub in Europe, with around 1,500 engineers from 40 countries working in a variety of areas including power management design and application processors. The new facility will house employees who will focus on connectivity and wireless technologies.
"I couldn't be more excited for everything our Munich engineering teams will discover — from exploring the new frontiers of 5G technology, to a new generation of technologies that bring power, speed, and connectivity to the world," said Tim Cook, Apple’s CEO. "Munich has been a home to Apple for four decades, and we're grateful to this community and to Germany for being a part of our journey."
The new, 30,000-square-meter facility is located in central Munich's Karlstrasse, and will be home to Apple's growing cellular unit, Europe's largest R&D site for mobile wireless semiconductors and software. Teams there will create 5G and future technologies, and focus on developing, integrating, and optimizing wireless modems for Apple products.

Apple plans to start moving into the new building in late 2022, and like all Apple offices globally, it will run entirely on 100 percent renewable energy.

Apple says it has spent over 15 billion euros with more than 700 companies of all sizes across Germany. This includes the chip manufacturer Infineon, battery company Varta, and the family-owned chemical company DELO, which is delivering resin for Face ID technology in products like the iPhone 12.
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Apple Watch May Display Incorrect Altitude Readings in Unusual Weather Conditions

The Apple Watch Series 6 and Apple Watch SE may give incorrect altitude readings in unusual weather conditions, as noted by iphone-ticker.de.

The ‌Apple Watch Series 6‌ and ‌Apple Watch SE‌ feature a next-generation always-on altimeter to provide real-time elevation information. Apple says that its updated altimeter cross-references information from GPS and nearby Wi-Fi networks to detect even the smallest changes in elevation above ground level, up and down to the measurement of 1 foot.

However, a large number of Apple Watch users in Germany have been receiving altitude readings that were incorrect by a wide margin. Many users reported that their altitude was calculated 200 to 300 meters too high, despite the fact that affected devices had worked correctly in the past.

Users on Apple’s German support forums found that a period of low air pressure was causing the Apple Watch’s altimeter to give incorrect altitude readings. While it is normal for changes in air pressure to affect barometric altimeters, the problem is usually dealt with by regular recalibrations to the current air pressure value at sea level. However, Apple does not allow users to manually prompt altimeter recalibration, and it is unknown how often the Apple Watch automatically recalibrates itself.

Affected users should still receive correct information when tracking a workout such as a hike, since the Apple Watch records altitude relative to the start point. Nevertheless, it is not clear why some Apple Watches are not using GPS information to link barometric measurements to location. This would allow the Apple Watch to identify when there are fronts of weather that significantly affect air pressure and then prompt altimeter recalibration.

Some users in Germany are reporting that they are still receiving disproportionately incorrect readings, while others have found that the only way to prompt altimeter recalibration was to factory-reset their Apple Watch and iPhone.

Tag: Germany

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The Apple Watch Series 6 and Apple Watch SE may give incorrect altitude readings in unusual weather conditions, as noted by iphone-ticker.de.



The ‌Apple Watch Series 6‌ and ‌Apple Watch SE‌ feature a next-generation always-on altimeter to provide real-time elevation information. Apple says that its updated altimeter cross-references information from GPS and nearby Wi-Fi networks to detect even the smallest changes in elevation above ground level, up and down to the measurement of 1 foot.

However, a large number of Apple Watch users in Germany have been receiving altitude readings that were incorrect by a wide margin. Many users reported that their altitude was calculated 200 to 300 meters too high, despite the fact that affected devices had worked correctly in the past.

Users on Apple's German support forums found that a period of low air pressure was causing the Apple Watch's altimeter to give incorrect altitude readings. While it is normal for changes in air pressure to affect barometric altimeters, the problem is usually dealt with by regular recalibrations to the current air pressure value at sea level. However, Apple does not allow users to manually prompt altimeter recalibration, and it is unknown how often the Apple Watch automatically recalibrates itself.

Affected users should still receive correct information when tracking a workout such as a hike, since the Apple Watch records altitude relative to the start point. Nevertheless, it is not clear why some Apple Watches are not using GPS information to link barometric measurements to location. This would allow the Apple Watch to identify when there are fronts of weather that significantly affect air pressure and then prompt altimeter recalibration.

Some users in Germany are reporting that they are still receiving disproportionately incorrect readings, while others have found that the only way to prompt altimeter recalibration was to factory-reset their Apple Watch and iPhone.
Tag: Germany

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Vodafone Germany Provides Apple TV 4K With Every GigaTV Contract

Germany’s largest TV provider Vodafone has announced that its GigaTV service is now available bundled with an Apple TV 4K, which is on loan to customers for the duration of their contractual period (via Macerkopf.de).


Both new and existing Vodafone Deutschland customers will receive the ‌Apple TV‌ 4K, and Apple’s single sign-on process for GigaTV extends to iPhone and iPad, allowing users to get access to GigaTV content from their other Apple devices.

In addition to the GigaTV app, Vodafone customers will also have access to all the usual ‌Apple TV‌ apps and functions. Vodafone customers will also benefit from free access to Apple TV+ for one year.

GigaTV offers customers up to 120 TV channels in SD and HD quality as well as on-demand access to up to 69 content categories via ‌Apple TV‌. The bundle costs 9.99 euros per month for the first six months of the 24-month contract period and then 19.99 euros a month.

A one-time fee of €49.99 is charged for installation, and a two-month trial of Vodafone Premium is included in the offer. The premium pay TV package can be reserved for €9.99 per month and includes 21 additional HD channels. More details available on the GigaTV website.

Related Roundups: Apple TV, tvOS 14
Tag: Germany
Buyer’s Guide: Apple TV (Don’t Buy)

This article, “Vodafone Germany Provides Apple TV 4K With Every GigaTV Contract” first appeared on MacRumors.com

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Germany's largest TV provider Vodafone has announced that its GigaTV service is now available bundled with an Apple TV 4K, which is on loan to customers for the duration of their contractual period (via Macerkopf.de).


Both new and existing Vodafone Deutschland customers will receive the ‌Apple TV‌ 4K, and Apple's single sign-on process for GigaTV extends to iPhone and iPad, allowing users to get access to GigaTV content from their other Apple devices.

In addition to the GigaTV app, Vodafone customers will also have access to all the usual ‌Apple TV‌ apps and functions. Vodafone customers will also benefit from free access to Apple TV+ for one year.

GigaTV offers customers up to 120 TV channels in SD and HD quality as well as on-demand access to up to 69 content categories via ‌Apple TV‌. The bundle costs 9.99 euros per month for the first six months of the 24-month contract period and then 19.99 euros a month.


A one-time fee of €49.99 is charged for installation, and a two-month trial of Vodafone Premium is included in the offer. The premium pay TV package can be reserved for €9.99 per month and includes 21 additional HD channels. More details available on the GigaTV website.
Related Roundups: Apple TV, tvOS 14
Tag: Germany
Buyer's Guide: Apple TV (Don't Buy)

This article, "Vodafone Germany Provides Apple TV 4K With Every GigaTV Contract" first appeared on MacRumors.com

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Apple and Amazon Face Antitrust Scrutiny in Germany Over ‘Brandgating’

Apple and Amazon are set to face antitrust scrutiny in Germany over a policy that forbids independent sellers from retailing Apple products on Amazon, Bloomberg reports.

Germany’s antitrust regulator, the Federal Cartel Office, has launched a probe into Apple and Amazon over the policy of “brandgating.” The policy allows the makers of branded products, such as the iPhone, to have independent sellers removed from the retail platform, providing Amazon can sell the items instead.

“Brandgating agreements can help to protect against product piracy,” the Cartel Office said in a statement. “But such measures must be proportionate to be in line with antitrust rules and may not result in eliminating competition.”

Amazon responded, saying it never removes the sales permissions of sellers without sound reasons, and it invests heavily to protect customers from the illegal distribution of goods. The company has agreed to cooperate with the investigation.

The Cartel Office said that Apple is a “prominent” example of how Amazon conducts brandgating, which can purportedly take various forms. Amazon has only permitted Apple authorized vendors to sell Apple products on its platform since 2019. Amazon simultaneously became an Apple authorized vendor.

“The safety of our customers is our first priority, and our teams are constantly working with law enforcement, resellers, and e-commerce sites around the world to remove counterfeit products from the market,” Apple said in a statement. “We work with Amazon to protect our customers from counterfeit products and provide confidence they are receiving a genuine Apple product out of the box.”

The two companies have been investigated for similar accusations in the past, such as allegedly blocking the sale of Apple and Beats devices from resellers in order to stifle competition and fix prices.

Apple and Amazon are among the big tech companies under scrutiny around the world, particularly in the European Union, where a new Digital Services Act is poised to hit big tech with wide-reaching regulations.

Note: Due to the political or social nature of the discussion regarding this topic, the discussion thread is located in our Political News forum. All forum members and site visitors are welcome to read and follow the thread, but posting is limited to forum members with at least 100 posts.

This article, “Apple and Amazon Face Antitrust Scrutiny in Germany Over ‘Brandgating’” first appeared on MacRumors.com

Discuss this article in our forums

Apple and Amazon are set to face antitrust scrutiny in Germany over a policy that forbids independent sellers from retailing Apple products on Amazon, Bloomberg reports.



Germany's antitrust regulator, the Federal Cartel Office, has launched a probe into Apple and Amazon over the policy of "brandgating." The policy allows the makers of branded products, such as the iPhone, to have independent sellers removed from the retail platform, providing Amazon can sell the items instead.

"Brandgating agreements can help to protect against product piracy," the Cartel Office said in a statement. "But such measures must be proportionate to be in line with antitrust rules and may not result in eliminating competition."


Amazon responded, saying it never removes the sales permissions of sellers without sound reasons, and it invests heavily to protect customers from the illegal distribution of goods. The company has agreed to cooperate with the investigation.

The Cartel Office said that Apple is a "prominent" example of how Amazon conducts brandgating, which can purportedly take various forms. Amazon has only permitted Apple authorized vendors to sell Apple products on its platform since 2019. Amazon simultaneously became an Apple authorized vendor.

"The safety of our customers is our first priority, and our teams are constantly working with law enforcement, resellers, and e-commerce sites around the world to remove counterfeit products from the market," Apple said in a statement. "We work with Amazon to protect our customers from counterfeit products and provide confidence they are receiving a genuine Apple product out of the box."


The two companies have been investigated for similar accusations in the past, such as allegedly blocking the sale of Apple and Beats devices from resellers in order to stifle competition and fix prices.

Apple and Amazon are among the big tech companies under scrutiny around the world, particularly in the European Union, where a new Digital Services Act is poised to hit big tech with wide-reaching regulations.

Note: Due to the political or social nature of the discussion regarding this topic, the discussion thread is located in our Political News forum. All forum members and site visitors are welcome to read and follow the thread, but posting is limited to forum members with at least 100 posts.
This article, "Apple and Amazon Face Antitrust Scrutiny in Germany Over 'Brandgating'" first appeared on MacRumors.com

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