Apple Shares Detailed Technical Overviews of Pro Display XDR and Mac Pro

Apple today shared two new “Technical Overview” white papers that take an extensive look into the technology and feature set of the Pro Display XDR and the Mac Pro.


Available as PDFs, the Mac Pro overview and the Pro Display XDR overview (via 9to5Mac) walk through key features and components, with ultra detailed rundowns on every component. The ‌Mac Pro‌ overview highlights the lattice case, Intel Xeon W chip, GPUs, PCIe expansion slots, MPX module, I/O, T2 chip, SSD, and more.

Apple explains the reason for design choices made for the ‌Mac Pro‌, does a deep dive into performance, and lists technical specifications. Much of this information has previously been shared in product pages and marketing info provided by Apple, but this is the single most comprehensive source for ‌Mac Pro‌ info.

The Pro Display XDR white paper is similar, detailing display panel components, LED backlighting system, timing controller, display accuracy, reference modes, enclosure design mounting, and technical specifications.


This information has also been previously shared by Apple for the most part, but again, the white paper is a useful place to see it all in one place.

These are useful resources for those who are interested in learning more about the ‌Mac Pro‌ and the Pro Display XDR ahead of purchase, and can be found through these PDF links: Pro Display XDR and Mac Pro.

Related Roundups: Mac Pro, Apple Pro Display XDR
Buyer’s Guide: Mac Pro (Buy Now)

This article, “Apple Shares Detailed Technical Overviews of Pro Display XDR and Mac Pro” first appeared on MacRumors.com

Discuss this article in our forums

Apple today shared two new "Technical Overview" white papers that take an extensive look into the technology and feature set of the Pro Display XDR and the Mac Pro.


Available as PDFs, the Mac Pro overview and the Pro Display XDR overview (via 9to5Mac) walk through key features and components, with ultra detailed rundowns on every component. The ‌Mac Pro‌ overview highlights the lattice case, Intel Xeon W chip, GPUs, PCIe expansion slots, MPX module, I/O, T2 chip, SSD, and more.

Apple explains the reason for design choices made for the ‌Mac Pro‌, does a deep dive into performance, and lists technical specifications. Much of this information has previously been shared in product pages and marketing info provided by Apple, but this is the single most comprehensive source for ‌Mac Pro‌ info.

The Pro Display XDR white paper is similar, detailing display panel components, LED backlighting system, timing controller, display accuracy, reference modes, enclosure design mounting, and technical specifications.


This information has also been previously shared by Apple for the most part, but again, the white paper is a useful place to see it all in one place.

These are useful resources for those who are interested in learning more about the ‌Mac Pro‌ and the Pro Display XDR ahead of purchase, and can be found through these PDF links: Pro Display XDR and Mac Pro.

Related Roundups: Mac Pro, Apple Pro Display XDR
Buyer's Guide: Mac Pro (Buy Now)

This article, "Apple Shares Detailed Technical Overviews of Pro Display XDR and Mac Pro" first appeared on MacRumors.com

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YouTuber Compares Apple Pro Display XDR to $43K Sony Reference Monitor, Says It’s a ‘No Go’ for Professional Colorists

Apple charges $5,000 for its Pro Display XDR and has described it as a display designed for professionals, even claiming that it can match the performance of some professional reference monitors on the market that sell for much more.

Vincent Teoh, a TV reviewer at HDTVTest, recently tested Apple’s Pro Display XDR claims, comparing it to Sony’s BVM-HX310 reference monitor, which uses dual-layer LCD technology and costs over $40,000.

Prior to pitting the Pro Display XDR against the Sony HX310, Teoh does in-depth testing of Apple’s display, measuring brightness, contrast, and color accuracy, with the testing demonstrating some of the faults in the Pro Display XDR.

There were problems with contrast and color accuracy at peak brightness along with “so-so” screen uniformity, leading Teoh to call the reference mode of the Pro Display XDR suitable for content consumption rather than content creation.

Teoh then compared the Pro Display XDR to the Sony BVM-HX310 reference display as the Sony display is the one that was mentioned when the Pro Display XDR was unveiled. The Pro Display XDR struggled to keep up with the Sony display, and Teoh said that it is not a viable cheaper reference monitor for professionals.

It appears that Apple’s marketing team may have been a bit overzealous in calling the Pro Display XDR the ‘World’s best pro display.’ […]

Compared side by side with the Sony HX310, the Pro Display XDR exhibits a number of shortcomings, particularly in dark scenes such as localized luminous fluctuations, blooming artifacts, as well as noticeably grayer blacks.

For a monitor to be used as a reference for commercial color grading, there can be no doubt whatsover about the picture on screen.

Let’s say J.J. Abrams is looking over your shoulders and wants a bit more lens flare in a particular scene. Can you be 100% sure that the VFX you’re adding in post will be reproduced accurately when watched on other displays? With the Pro Display XDR, there’s no way you can tell.

“I think the Pro Display XDR is a no go for any serious professional colorist,” he concluded. “At the end of the day, the Pro Display XDR is just an IPS display with 576 full array local dimming zones that happens to carry Apple’s logo and costs $5,000.”

He questions whether it’s fair to judge a $5,000 monitor against a $43,000 reference display, but points out that it was Apple that made that comparison first at WWDC. “The Pro Display XDR doesn’t deliver anywhere close to the consistency and accuracy demanded of reference monitors.”

Teoh’s full video on the Pro Display XDR is well worth watching for those who want to see the full testing details prior to making a purchase.

(H/T Matthew Panzarino and The Loop)

Related Roundup: Apple Pro Display XDR

This article, “YouTuber Compares Apple Pro Display XDR to $43K Sony Reference Monitor, Says It’s a ‘No Go’ for Professional Colorists” first appeared on MacRumors.com

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Apple charges $5,000 for its Pro Display XDR and has described it as a display designed for professionals, even claiming that it can match the performance of some professional reference monitors on the market that sell for much more.

Vincent Teoh, a TV reviewer at HDTVTest, recently tested Apple's Pro Display XDR claims, comparing it to Sony's BVM-HX310 reference monitor, which uses dual-layer LCD technology and costs over $40,000.


Prior to pitting the Pro Display XDR against the Sony HX310, Teoh does in-depth testing of Apple's display, measuring brightness, contrast, and color accuracy, with the testing demonstrating some of the faults in the Pro Display XDR.

There were problems with contrast and color accuracy at peak brightness along with "so-so" screen uniformity, leading Teoh to call the reference mode of the Pro Display XDR suitable for content consumption rather than content creation.

Teoh then compared the Pro Display XDR to the Sony BVM-HX310 reference display as the Sony display is the one that was mentioned when the Pro Display XDR was unveiled. The Pro Display XDR struggled to keep up with the Sony display, and Teoh said that it is not a viable cheaper reference monitor for professionals.
It appears that Apple's marketing team may have been a bit overzealous in calling the Pro Display XDR the 'World's best pro display.' [...]

Compared side by side with the Sony HX310, the Pro Display XDR exhibits a number of shortcomings, particularly in dark scenes such as localized luminous fluctuations, blooming artifacts, as well as noticeably grayer blacks.

For a monitor to be used as a reference for commercial color grading, there can be no doubt whatsover about the picture on screen.

Let's say J.J. Abrams is looking over your shoulders and wants a bit more lens flare in a particular scene. Can you be 100% sure that the VFX you're adding in post will be reproduced accurately when watched on other displays? With the Pro Display XDR, there's no way you can tell.
"I think the Pro Display XDR is a no go for any serious professional colorist," he concluded. "At the end of the day, the Pro Display XDR is just an IPS display with 576 full array local dimming zones that happens to carry Apple's logo and costs $5,000."

He questions whether it's fair to judge a $5,000 monitor against a $43,000 reference display, but points out that it was Apple that made that comparison first at WWDC. "The Pro Display XDR doesn't deliver anywhere close to the consistency and accuracy demanded of reference monitors."

Teoh's full video on the Pro Display XDR is well worth watching for those who want to see the full testing details prior to making a purchase.

(H/T Matthew Panzarino and The Loop)

Related Roundup: Apple Pro Display XDR

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PCMag Tests Apple’s Pro Display XDR Color Accuracy and Brightness, Says It ‘Does Exactly What It Sets Out To’

Apple’s Pro Display XDR, priced at $4,999 without a stand, is designed for professionals who need a reference monitor. It may seem expensive, but comparative to other reference monitors, it’s an affordable choice.

PCMag this week published its full review of the Pro Display XDR, doing a deep dive into its color accuracy and HDR capabilities.


The Pro Display XDR is meant to be used by creative professionals such as photographers and videographers, which means factors like color accuracy, gamut coverage, and sustained brightness are important.

In Adobe RGB color gamut testing, relevant for content creation tasks, the Pro Display XDR had what PCMag says is an “excellent” result of 96.7 percent coverage. Comparatively, the Pro Display XDR beat out the Acer Predator X35, the ASUS Rog Strix XG438Q, the Dell U3219Q 4K, and the Razer Raptor 27, which are other displays PCMag has tested, but that’s not a surprising result as these comparison displays are more affordable gaming-focused monitors.


The Pro Display XDR didn’t fare quite as well in sRGB gamut testing, where monitors normally get close to 100 percent coverage, but it still hit a respectable 94.3 coverage. sRGB is not a focus of the pro community, which makes this result fairly inconsequential.

In a DCI-P3 color gamut test, which highlights how well a monitor is able to display movie and tv content in editing apps, the Pro Display XDR saw 98.7 percent coverage, beating out all other monitors including the Alienware 55, which scored the second-highest in PCMag‘s testing at 96.5 percent.

When it comes to brightness testing, with a DisplayHDR 1600 test, the XDR was able to display content at a peak burst of 1,561 nits, just under Apple’s 1,600-nit rating. SDR brightness reached 499 nits, and the black levels were super low, at 0.04. PCMag says that’s the lowest it has seen outside of OLED displays.


In color accuracy tests, the Pro Display XDR also excelled. Color accuracy is measured using delta E (dE) and a lower number is better, representing an accurate representation of the color it’s aiming to produce. Monitors under 1.0 are “top tier” monitors, but the Pro Display XDR scored below that.

More records broken. In the industry of content creation, any monitor that scores below a 1.0 dE is considered top-tier, but the Pro Display XDR isn’t content with just winning here, it has to command the lead. In these tests, which I ran through all three color-space presets we tested above (sRGB, Adobe RGB, and DCI-P3), the lowest score achieved was just 0.68 dE–and that, achieved with no calibration required.

There were some downsides to the Pro Display XDR. There’s no option for changing color capabilities on the monitor itself, and using it requires macOS, so there’s no way to use it without a Mac. There’s also no way to calibrate the colors, but Apple says that calibration options are coming sometime in the future.

The site was impressed with the add-on $999 stand for the Mac Pro given its nice, shiny look and its smooth counter-balanced arm, but ultimately felt that it was a bit over-engineered and overpriced, saying that it “didn’t need to be” so far ahead of a typical (and much less expensive) monitor stand.

In a nutshell, PCMag believes that the Pro Display XDR successfully does what it was meant to do, offer up “reference-quality production capabilities” to those who work on Macs. “The Pro Display XDR is a beautifully made, well-designed, hyper-accurate content creation monitor that–say it with me now–‘just works,'” reads the review.

For those considering a purchase of the Pro Display XDR, PCMag‘s full review is well worth checking out.

Related Roundup: Apple Pro Display XDR

This article, “PCMag Tests Apple’s Pro Display XDR Color Accuracy and Brightness, Says It ‘Does Exactly What It Sets Out To’” first appeared on MacRumors.com

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Apple's Pro Display XDR, priced at $4,999 without a stand, is designed for professionals who need a reference monitor. It may seem expensive, but comparative to other reference monitors, it's an affordable choice.

PCMag this week published its full review of the Pro Display XDR, doing a deep dive into its color accuracy and HDR capabilities.


The Pro Display XDR is meant to be used by creative professionals such as photographers and videographers, which means factors like color accuracy, gamut coverage, and sustained brightness are important.

In Adobe RGB color gamut testing, relevant for content creation tasks, the Pro Display XDR had what PCMag says is an "excellent" result of 96.7 percent coverage. Comparatively, the Pro Display XDR beat out the Acer Predator X35, the ASUS Rog Strix XG438Q, the Dell U3219Q 4K, and the Razer Raptor 27, which are other displays PCMag has tested, but that's not a surprising result as these comparison displays are more affordable gaming-focused monitors.


The Pro Display XDR didn't fare quite as well in sRGB gamut testing, where monitors normally get close to 100 percent coverage, but it still hit a respectable 94.3 coverage. sRGB is not a focus of the pro community, which makes this result fairly inconsequential.

In a DCI-P3 color gamut test, which highlights how well a monitor is able to display movie and tv content in editing apps, the Pro Display XDR saw 98.7 percent coverage, beating out all other monitors including the Alienware 55, which scored the second-highest in PCMag's testing at 96.5 percent.

When it comes to brightness testing, with a DisplayHDR 1600 test, the XDR was able to display content at a peak burst of 1,561 nits, just under Apple's 1,600-nit rating. SDR brightness reached 499 nits, and the black levels were super low, at 0.04. PCMag says that's the lowest it has seen outside of OLED displays.


In color accuracy tests, the Pro Display XDR also excelled. Color accuracy is measured using delta E (dE) and a lower number is better, representing an accurate representation of the color it's aiming to produce. Monitors under 1.0 are "top tier" monitors, but the Pro Display XDR scored below that.
More records broken. In the industry of content creation, any monitor that scores below a 1.0 dE is considered top-tier, but the Pro Display XDR isn't content with just winning here, it has to command the lead. In these tests, which I ran through all three color-space presets we tested above (sRGB, Adobe RGB, and DCI-P3), the lowest score achieved was just 0.68 dE--and that, achieved with no calibration required.
There were some downsides to the Pro Display XDR. There's no option for changing color capabilities on the monitor itself, and using it requires macOS, so there's no way to use it without a Mac. There's also no way to calibrate the colors, but Apple says that calibration options are coming sometime in the future.

The site was impressed with the add-on $999 stand for the Mac Pro given its nice, shiny look and its smooth counter-balanced arm, but ultimately felt that it was a bit over-engineered and overpriced, saying that it "didn't need to be" so far ahead of a typical (and much less expensive) monitor stand.

In a nutshell, PCMag believes that the Pro Display XDR successfully does what it was meant to do, offer up "reference-quality production capabilities" to those who work on Macs. "The Pro Display XDR is a beautifully made, well-designed, hyper-accurate content creation monitor that--say it with me now--'just works,'" reads the review.

For those considering a purchase of the Pro Display XDR, PCMag's full review is well worth checking out.

Related Roundup: Apple Pro Display XDR

This article, "PCMag Tests Apple's Pro Display XDR Color Accuracy and Brightness, Says It 'Does Exactly What It Sets Out To'" first appeared on MacRumors.com

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Hands-On With Apple’s $4999 Pro Display XDR and $999 Stand

Alongside the Mac Pro, Apple launched the Pro Display XDR, a 6K professional display that’s designed to be used with the ‌Mac Pro‌ and other high-powered Apple machines.

We picked up a Pro Display XDR alongside our Mac Pro, and it arrived today, so we thought we’d do an unboxing, hands-on, and first impressions video for MacRumors readers.

Subscribe to the MacRumors YouTube channel for more videos.

As a display designed for professional use, the Pro Display XDR has a $4,999 price tag that’s not exactly consumer friendly, and Apple is charging an additional $999 for the stand that we have here, which has resulted in endless jokes.

Basically, if you want a functional display, you need to shell out $6,000, because unless you’re going to mount the display using the $200 VESA mount, this is the only available stand at the current time.

The Pro Display XDR ships in an all-white pull tab box like the ‌Mac Pro‌, and it comes with a microfiber cleaning cloth, a braided power cable, and a braided Thunderbolt 3 cable.

We’ve got the Pro Display XDR without the matte nano-texture, which is $1,000 more expensive and not shipping yet, but if you do buy that nano-texture version, it’s worth noting that you can only clean it with this included cloth if you don’t want to damage it.

The Pro Display XDR connects to the standalone stand using super strong magnets, and the whole setup feels sturdy and high-quality, as it should at this price point.

Design wise, the Pro Display XDR has the same lattice design as the ‌Mac Pro‌ for the back of the display, used for ventilation and cooling. There are four USB-C ports on the Pro Display XDR, with one serving as a Thunderbolt 3 port for connecting to the ‌Mac Pro‌.

You can swivel the Pro Display XDR into portrait mode or landscape mode using a little button on the monitor stand, which is handy for those who prefer to use their displays in vertical mode. Tilt and height are also able to be adjusted.

The display itself is 32 inches in size with a resolution of 6016 x 3384, and unsurprisingly, it looks fantastic. It features 1,600 nits of peak brightness and 1,000 nits of sustained brightness, along with a super wide viewing angle and a 1,000,000:1 contrast ratio. In a nutshell, it’s an incredible display.

The color accuracy is impressive and suitable for professional use, and the HDR paired with the 1600 nits of peak brightness is excellent for those who are editing HDR content.

Apple is charging a minimum of $4,999 for this display, which sounds outrageous, but it is a display for professional use and when it comes to the quality and the feature set, it is a solid deal and competitively priced compared to other pro-level monitors.

Reference monitors used by Hollywood studios for TV and film editing, for example, can cost five times more than the Pro Display XDR with the same specs as the Pro Display XDR.

The Pro Display XDR was designed to be used with the ‌Mac Pro‌, but it is also compatible with 2018 or later 15-inch MacBook Pro models, the 16-inch ‌MacBook Pro‌, and the 2019 iMac models. You can also use it with the 2017 iMac Pro, but not at the full 6K resolution.

What do you think of the Pro Display XDR? Let us know in the comments.

Related Roundup: Apple Pro Display XDR

This article, “Hands-On With Apple’s $4999 Pro Display XDR and $999 Stand” first appeared on MacRumors.com

Discuss this article in our forums

Alongside the Mac Pro, Apple launched the Pro Display XDR, a 6K professional display that's designed to be used with the ‌Mac Pro‌ and other high-powered Apple machines.

We picked up a Pro Display XDR alongside our Mac Pro, and it arrived today, so we thought we'd do an unboxing, hands-on, and first impressions video for MacRumors readers.

Subscribe to the MacRumors YouTube channel for more videos.

As a display designed for professional use, the Pro Display XDR has a $4,999 price tag that's not exactly consumer friendly, and Apple is charging an additional $999 for the stand that we have here, which has resulted in endless jokes.

Basically, if you want a functional display, you need to shell out $6,000, because unless you're going to mount the display using the $200 VESA mount, this is the only available stand at the current time.

The Pro Display XDR ships in an all-white pull tab box like the ‌Mac Pro‌, and it comes with a microfiber cleaning cloth, a braided power cable, and a braided Thunderbolt 3 cable.

We've got the Pro Display XDR without the matte nano-texture, which is $1,000 more expensive and not shipping yet, but if you do buy that nano-texture version, it's worth noting that you can only clean it with this included cloth if you don't want to damage it.

The Pro Display XDR connects to the standalone stand using super strong magnets, and the whole setup feels sturdy and high-quality, as it should at this price point.

Design wise, the Pro Display XDR has the same lattice design as the ‌Mac Pro‌ for the back of the display, used for ventilation and cooling. There are four USB-C ports on the Pro Display XDR, with one serving as a Thunderbolt 3 port for connecting to the ‌Mac Pro‌.

You can swivel the Pro Display XDR into portrait mode or landscape mode using a little button on the monitor stand, which is handy for those who prefer to use their displays in vertical mode. Tilt and height are also able to be adjusted.

The display itself is 32 inches in size with a resolution of 6016 x 3384, and unsurprisingly, it looks fantastic. It features 1,600 nits of peak brightness and 1,000 nits of sustained brightness, along with a super wide viewing angle and a 1,000,000:1 contrast ratio. In a nutshell, it's an incredible display.

The color accuracy is impressive and suitable for professional use, and the HDR paired with the 1600 nits of peak brightness is excellent for those who are editing HDR content.

Apple is charging a minimum of $4,999 for this display, which sounds outrageous, but it is a display for professional use and when it comes to the quality and the feature set, it is a solid deal and competitively priced compared to other pro-level monitors.

Reference monitors used by Hollywood studios for TV and film editing, for example, can cost five times more than the Pro Display XDR with the same specs as the Pro Display XDR.

The Pro Display XDR was designed to be used with the ‌Mac Pro‌, but it is also compatible with 2018 or later 15-inch MacBook Pro models, the 16-inch ‌MacBook Pro‌, and the 2019 iMac models. You can also use it with the 2017 iMac Pro, but not at the full 6K resolution.

What do you think of the Pro Display XDR? Let us know in the comments.

Related Roundup: Apple Pro Display XDR

This article, "Hands-On With Apple's $4999 Pro Display XDR and $999 Stand" first appeared on MacRumors.com

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Apple’s Pro Display XDR With Nano-Texture Can Only Be Cleaned With Special Apple-Provided Cloth

Apple’s new Pro Display XDR comes with an optional nano-texture glass, which is etched at the nanometer level to cut down on reflectivity and glare for a matte look.

The nano-texture glass costs an extra $1,000, and as it turns out, it also impacts how the Pro Display XDR can be cleaned.


According to an Apple support document, the Pro Display XDR with nano-texture glass must be cleaned only with the dry polishing cloth that Apple provides. No water or liquids should be used to clean the glass.

Apple warns that Pro Display XDR owners should never use any other cloths to clean the glass, and if the included dry polishing cloth is lost, Apple Support should be contacted so another cloth can be ordered. There’s no word yet on what Apple is charging for replacement cleaning cloths.

Apple also has specific instructions for washing the polishing cloth, which includes using dish soap and water, rinsing thoroughly, and then letting it air dry for at least 24 hours.

The standard Pro Display XDR glass can be cleaned with a standard microfiber cloth and a small amount of water, while the casing can be cleaned using a soft, slightly damp, lint-free cloth.

Since its announcement, the Pro Display XDR has been the butt of multiple jokes as Apple is charging $4,999 for the display, and an extra $999 for its stand. The need for a specific Apple-designed cleaning cloth isn’t likely to help the situation.

Apple’s Pro Display XDR, which is meant to be used alongside the Mac Pro, is available starting today. Pro Display XDR orders with standard glass will start arriving to customers on December 20, but the Pro Display XDR with nano-texture glass won’t be available until January 21 at the earliest.

Related Roundup: Apple Pro Display XDR

This article, “Apple’s Pro Display XDR With Nano-Texture Can Only Be Cleaned With Special Apple-Provided Cloth” first appeared on MacRumors.com

Discuss this article in our forums

Apple's new Pro Display XDR comes with an optional nano-texture glass, which is etched at the nanometer level to cut down on reflectivity and glare for a matte look.

The nano-texture glass costs an extra $1,000, and as it turns out, it also impacts how the Pro Display XDR can be cleaned.


According to an Apple support document, the Pro Display XDR with nano-texture glass must be cleaned only with the dry polishing cloth that Apple provides. No water or liquids should be used to clean the glass.

Apple warns that Pro Display XDR owners should never use any other cloths to clean the glass, and if the included dry polishing cloth is lost, Apple Support should be contacted so another cloth can be ordered. There's no word yet on what Apple is charging for replacement cleaning cloths.

Apple also has specific instructions for washing the polishing cloth, which includes using dish soap and water, rinsing thoroughly, and then letting it air dry for at least 24 hours.

The standard Pro Display XDR glass can be cleaned with a standard microfiber cloth and a small amount of water, while the casing can be cleaned using a soft, slightly damp, lint-free cloth.

Since its announcement, the Pro Display XDR has been the butt of multiple jokes as Apple is charging $4,999 for the display, and an extra $999 for its stand. The need for a specific Apple-designed cleaning cloth isn't likely to help the situation.

Apple's Pro Display XDR, which is meant to be used alongside the Mac Pro, is available starting today. Pro Display XDR orders with standard glass will start arriving to customers on December 20, but the Pro Display XDR with nano-texture glass won't be available until January 21 at the earliest.

Related Roundup: Apple Pro Display XDR

This article, "Apple's Pro Display XDR With Nano-Texture Can Only Be Cleaned With Special Apple-Provided Cloth" first appeared on MacRumors.com

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Apple to Release Mac Pro and Pro Display XDR on December 10

Apple plans to release the new Mac Pro and the Pro Display XDR on Tuesday, December 10, according to “Save the Date” emails that Apple began sending out to some customers this afternoon.


Apple in November confirmed that the ‌Mac Pro‌ and Pro Display XDR would come in December, but until now, the company had not provided a specific date. Apple’s emails say orders will begin on December 10, so presumably shipments will begin soon after orders open up.

The new modular ‌Mac Pro‌ was first introduced in June at the WorldWide developers Conference, with the machine aimed at Apple’s pro user base.

The ‌Mac Pro‌ was designed with a heavy focus on upgradeability and expansion, and it features a traditional PC shape with an Apple-esque stainless steel frame with a lattice pattern that maximizes airflow.

Internal specs include workstation-class Xeon processors with up to 28 cores, up to 1.5TB of high-performance memory, up to two Radeon Pro II Duo GPUs, and eight PCIe expansion slots, along with an Apple Afterburner accelerator card.

Pricing on the ‌Mac Pro‌ will start at $6,000, and will go up based on configuration. The base ‌Mac Pro‌ features an 8-core Xeon W chip.

Apple plans to sell the ‌Mac Pro‌ alongside the Pro Display XDR, a 6K display with a resolution of 6016 x 3384 and more than 20 million pixels. Pricing on the Pro Display XDR starts at $5,000, with an add-on stand priced at $999.

(Thanks, Ryan!)

Related Roundups: Mac Pro, Apple Pro Display XDR
Buyer’s Guide: Mac Pro (Don’t Buy)

This article, “Apple to Release Mac Pro and Pro Display XDR on December 10” first appeared on MacRumors.com

Discuss this article in our forums

Apple plans to release the new Mac Pro and the Pro Display XDR on Tuesday, December 10, according to "Save the Date" emails that Apple began sending out to some customers this afternoon.


Apple in November confirmed that the ‌Mac Pro‌ and Pro Display XDR would come in December, but until now, the company had not provided a specific date. Apple's emails say orders will begin on December 10, so presumably shipments will begin soon after orders open up.

The new modular ‌Mac Pro‌ was first introduced in June at the WorldWide developers Conference, with the machine aimed at Apple's pro user base.

The ‌Mac Pro‌ was designed with a heavy focus on upgradeability and expansion, and it features a traditional PC shape with an Apple-esque stainless steel frame with a lattice pattern that maximizes airflow.

Internal specs include workstation-class Xeon processors with up to 28 cores, up to 1.5TB of high-performance memory, up to two Radeon Pro II Duo GPUs, and eight PCIe expansion slots, along with an Apple Afterburner accelerator card.

Pricing on the ‌Mac Pro‌ will start at $6,000, and will go up based on configuration. The base ‌Mac Pro‌ features an 8-core Xeon W chip.

Apple plans to sell the ‌Mac Pro‌ alongside the Pro Display XDR, a 6K display with a resolution of 6016 x 3384 and more than 20 million pixels. Pricing on the Pro Display XDR starts at $5,000, with an add-on stand priced at $999.

(Thanks, Ryan!)

Related Roundups: Mac Pro, Apple Pro Display XDR
Buyer's Guide: Mac Pro (Don't Buy)

This article, "Apple to Release Mac Pro and Pro Display XDR on December 10" first appeared on MacRumors.com

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Apple Says New Mac Pro and Pro Display XDR Are Coming in September

Apple at WWDC 2019 last week unveiled its long-awaited redesigned Mac Pro along with a new Pro Display XDR. At the time, Apple said both products will be available to order in the fall, without providing a more specific timeframe.


Apple has since updated its website following the end of WWDC, however, revealing that the new Mac Pro and Pro Display XDR are “coming in September.” This date is listed on Apple’s homepage in a lightbox that pops up after clicking on “notify me” under each product, although only in the United States.

This date has yet to be listed outside of the United States, while the main Mac Pro page and other marketing materials still say “coming in the fall,” so it is possible this is an error. We’ve reached out to Apple for comment.



The all-new Mac Pro is an absolute powerhouse with up to 28-core Intel Xeon processors, up to 1.5TB of ECC RAM, up to 4TB of SSD storage, up to AMD Radeon Pro Vega II Duo graphics with 64GB of HBM2 memory, and eight PCIe expansion slots for maximum performance, expansion, and configurability.

The new design includes a stainless steel frame with smooth handles and an aluminum housing that lifts off for 360-degree access to the entire system. The housing also features a unique lattice pattern, which has already been referred to as a cheese grater, to maximize airflow and quiet operation.

Apple’s Pro Display XDR is a 32-inch 6K monitor with a P3 wide color gamut and true 10-bit color support, 1,600 nits of peak brightness, a 1,000,000:1 contrast ratio, and a super-wide, off-axis viewing angle.

The new Mac Pro starts at $5,999, while the Pro Display XDR starts at $4,999 with an optional $999 stand.

Related Roundups: Mac Pro, Apple Pro Display XDR
Buyer’s Guide: Mac Pro (Don’t Buy)

This article, “Apple Says New Mac Pro and Pro Display XDR Are Coming in September” first appeared on MacRumors.com

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Apple at WWDC 2019 last week unveiled its long-awaited redesigned Mac Pro along with a new Pro Display XDR. At the time, Apple said both products will be available to order in the fall, without providing a more specific timeframe.


Apple has since updated its website following the end of WWDC, however, revealing that the new Mac Pro and Pro Display XDR are "coming in September." This date is listed on Apple's homepage in a lightbox that pops up after clicking on "notify me" under each product, although only in the United States.

This date has yet to be listed outside of the United States, while the main Mac Pro page and other marketing materials still say "coming in the fall," so it is possible this is an error. We've reached out to Apple for comment.



The all-new Mac Pro is an absolute powerhouse with up to 28-core Intel Xeon processors, up to 1.5TB of ECC RAM, up to 4TB of SSD storage, up to AMD Radeon Pro Vega II Duo graphics with 64GB of HBM2 memory, and eight PCIe expansion slots for maximum performance, expansion, and configurability.

The new design includes a stainless steel frame with smooth handles and an aluminum housing that lifts off for 360-degree access to the entire system. The housing also features a unique lattice pattern, which has already been referred to as a cheese grater, to maximize airflow and quiet operation.

Apple's Pro Display XDR is a 32-inch 6K monitor with a P3 wide color gamut and true 10-bit color support, 1,600 nits of peak brightness, a 1,000,000:1 contrast ratio, and a super-wide, off-axis viewing angle.

The new Mac Pro starts at $5,999, while the Pro Display XDR starts at $4,999 with an optional $999 stand.

Related Roundups: Mac Pro, Apple Pro Display XDR
Buyer's Guide: Mac Pro (Don't Buy)

This article, "Apple Says New Mac Pro and Pro Display XDR Are Coming in September" first appeared on MacRumors.com

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Hands-On With the New 4K 23.7-Inch LG UltraFine Display

Apple this week began stocking a new 4K 23.7-inch LG UltraFine Display, which replaces the original 21.5-inch 4K LG UltraFine Display that was pulled from retail stores and the online Apple Store earlier this year.

We picked up one of the new 23.7-inch UltraFine Displays and thought we’d check it out to see if it’s worth the $700 price point.

Subscribe to the MacRumors YouTube channel for more videos.

The new 4K display looks quite similar to the prior-generation 4K and 5K UltraFine displays with a black plastic body with relatively thick bezels and a black aluminum stand. Like prior models, it can be VESA mounted if you prefer.

It’s larger than the original 4K UltraFine display as it measures in at 23.7 inches instead of 21.5 inches, but it features a 3840 x 2160 resolution rather than a 4096 x 2304 resolution like the first model. That’s still considered Ultra HD, though, and qualifies as 4K.


Though this display has a 4K resolution, it’s not meant to be used at the full 3840 x 1260 resolution given its 23.7-inch display size because everything on the display would be super small. Instead, it’s meant to provide retina clarity when downscaled to a more reasonable resolution like 1920 x 1080 or 2560 x 1440, which is what we have it set to.

Along with the larger display size, the new UltraFine Display features two Thunderbolt 3 ports instead of a single Thunderbolt 3 port, which means you can daisy chain two of these monitors together. We didn’t have a second on hand, but used daisy chaining with a different 4K LG display, which worked well.


You can also connect other Thunderbolt 3-enabled accessories directly to the display if preferred, and there are also three additional USB-C ports. Both a Thunderbolt 3 and USB-C cable are included. There’s no webcam, but there are built-in stereo speakers available, much like the prior version of the LG UltraFine displays available from Apple.

The display is crisp and vivid, rivaling the Retina display on Apple’s Macs, and we liked the high gloss finish despite the fact that it tends to add more glare. With 500 nits brightness, it’s fairly bright, and because it has P3 wide color support, all the colors are rich and true to life.

All in all, we came away with a positive impression of this display. Since you can daisy chain two of them together, it might be nice to have two of them if you can given the smaller size and the $700 price point, which is half of the price of the 5K UltraFine display.

With the 4K LG UltraFine Display having been replaced, Apple may also have a replacement for the 5K UltraFine monitor on the horizon. The 5K monitor is sold out on Apple’s site right now, though the listing for it hasn’t been removed entirely.

Apple is also planning to get back into displays with rumors suggesting a 31.6-inch 6K display is in the works and set to be released alongside a new Mac Pro that’s coming this year. Unfortunately, Apple’s 6K display is rumored to be super pricey, so it may be out of range for a lot of Mac users who will instead need to rely on other options like the UltraFine displays from LG.

Related Roundup: Apple Display 6K

This article, “Hands-On With the New 4K 23.7-Inch LG UltraFine Display” first appeared on MacRumors.com

Discuss this article in our forums

Apple this week began stocking a new 4K 23.7-inch LG UltraFine Display, which replaces the original 21.5-inch 4K LG UltraFine Display that was pulled from retail stores and the online Apple Store earlier this year.

We picked up one of the new 23.7-inch UltraFine Displays and thought we'd check it out to see if it's worth the $700 price point.

Subscribe to the MacRumors YouTube channel for more videos.

The new 4K display looks quite similar to the prior-generation 4K and 5K UltraFine displays with a black plastic body with relatively thick bezels and a black aluminum stand. Like prior models, it can be VESA mounted if you prefer.

It's larger than the original 4K UltraFine display as it measures in at 23.7 inches instead of 21.5 inches, but it features a 3840 x 2160 resolution rather than a 4096 x 2304 resolution like the first model. That's still considered Ultra HD, though, and qualifies as 4K.


Though this display has a 4K resolution, it's not meant to be used at the full 3840 x 1260 resolution given its 23.7-inch display size because everything on the display would be super small. Instead, it's meant to provide retina clarity when downscaled to a more reasonable resolution like 1920 x 1080 or 2560 x 1440, which is what we have it set to.

Along with the larger display size, the new UltraFine Display features two Thunderbolt 3 ports instead of a single Thunderbolt 3 port, which means you can daisy chain two of these monitors together. We didn't have a second on hand, but used daisy chaining with a different 4K LG display, which worked well.


You can also connect other Thunderbolt 3-enabled accessories directly to the display if preferred, and there are also three additional USB-C ports. Both a Thunderbolt 3 and USB-C cable are included. There's no webcam, but there are built-in stereo speakers available, much like the prior version of the LG UltraFine displays available from Apple.

The display is crisp and vivid, rivaling the Retina display on Apple's Macs, and we liked the high gloss finish despite the fact that it tends to add more glare. With 500 nits brightness, it's fairly bright, and because it has P3 wide color support, all the colors are rich and true to life.

All in all, we came away with a positive impression of this display. Since you can daisy chain two of them together, it might be nice to have two of them if you can given the smaller size and the $700 price point, which is half of the price of the 5K UltraFine display.

With the 4K LG UltraFine Display having been replaced, Apple may also have a replacement for the 5K UltraFine monitor on the horizon. The 5K monitor is sold out on Apple's site right now, though the listing for it hasn't been removed entirely.

Apple is also planning to get back into displays with rumors suggesting a 31.6-inch 6K display is in the works and set to be released alongside a new Mac Pro that's coming this year. Unfortunately, Apple's 6K display is rumored to be super pricey, so it may be out of range for a lot of Mac users who will instead need to rely on other options like the UltraFine displays from LG.

Related Roundup: Apple Display 6K

This article, "Hands-On With the New 4K 23.7-Inch LG UltraFine Display" first appeared on MacRumors.com

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Apple’s Online Store Now Offering New 4K 23.7-Inch LG UltraFine Display

The Apple online store and Apple retail stores in the United States are now offering a new 4K 23.7-inch LG UltraFine Display, which replaces the previously available 4K and 5K displays from LG.

Priced at $700, the new display was discovered in an Apple retail store yesterday before making its way online today.


Apple started offering 4K and 5K LG UltraFine displays alongside the 2016 MacBook Pro, but has since stopped selling both of the original models.

The new 23.7-inch display features a resolution of 3840 x 2160, which is lower than the 4096 x 2304 resolution of the prior 21.5-inch 4K display from LG, but is still considered an Ultra HD resolution.

Design wise, the updated LG UltraFine 4K display looks much like the prior 4K and 5K models with a simple black plastic body. It features P3 wide color gamut for vivid, true-to-life colors and 500 nits brightness.

It connects to a Mac through a single Thunderbolt 3 cable, offering up to 85W of charging power for notebooks. There are two Thunderbolt 3 ports, which is an improvement over the single port on the prior models.

With two Thunderbolt 3 ports, daisy-chaining other Thunderbolt 3 accessories (or a second display) over a single connection is possible. There are also three USB-C ports and built-in stereo speakers.

The new display is available today from the Apple online store and many Apple retail stores across the United States.

Related Roundup: Apple Display 6K

This article, “Apple’s Online Store Now Offering New 4K 23.7-Inch LG UltraFine Display” first appeared on MacRumors.com

Discuss this article in our forums

The Apple online store and Apple retail stores in the United States are now offering a new 4K 23.7-inch LG UltraFine Display, which replaces the previously available 4K and 5K displays from LG.

Priced at $700, the new display was discovered in an Apple retail store yesterday before making its way online today.


Apple started offering 4K and 5K LG UltraFine displays alongside the 2016 MacBook Pro, but has since stopped selling both of the original models.

The new 23.7-inch display features a resolution of 3840 x 2160, which is lower than the 4096 x 2304 resolution of the prior 21.5-inch 4K display from LG, but is still considered an Ultra HD resolution.

Design wise, the updated LG UltraFine 4K display looks much like the prior 4K and 5K models with a simple black plastic body. It features P3 wide color gamut for vivid, true-to-life colors and 500 nits brightness.

It connects to a Mac through a single Thunderbolt 3 cable, offering up to 85W of charging power for notebooks. There are two Thunderbolt 3 ports, which is an improvement over the single port on the prior models.

With two Thunderbolt 3 ports, daisy-chaining other Thunderbolt 3 accessories (or a second display) over a single connection is possible. There are also three USB-C ports and built-in stereo speakers.

The new display is available today from the Apple online store and many Apple retail stores across the United States.

Related Roundup: Apple Display 6K

This article, "Apple's Online Store Now Offering New 4K 23.7-Inch LG UltraFine Display" first appeared on MacRumors.com

Discuss this article in our forums

5K LG UltraFine Display Now Unavailable From Apple in the U.S.

Apple is no longer offering the 5K LG UltraFine Display from the Apple Store in the United States, with the monitor now listed as “Sold Out” and unavailable for pickup in any retail location.

The 5K LG display was in stock and available to be shipped just recently, so the stock shortage happened within the last few days. The listing for the display has not been eliminated from Apple’s site, so it’s not entirely clear if Apple plans to restock the monitor or if Apple is done selling it for good.


Apple last month removed the online listing for the 4K LG UltraFine Display, and prior to when it was pulled, the 4K monitor had been listed as “Sold Out” for some time, so Apple could be planning to remove the 5K monitor from the site in the near future as well.

The 4K and 5K UltraFine Displays were designed by LG in partnership with Apple and were created to be used with the 2016 13 and 15-inch MacBook Pro models, which supported Thunderbolt 3 for the first time.

The 27-inch 5K UltraFine Display featured a resolution of 5120 x 2880, P3 wide color gamut, and 85W of power delivery for charging a MacBook Pro. Apple was selling it for $1,299. The 27-inch 5K UltraFine display continues to be available from Best Buy, B&H Photo, and Amazon, and it is still listed on LG’s website.

Apple is potentially phasing out the LG displays because they’re several years old at this point and because there is a new Apple-branded display in the works. Apple is developing a high-end high-throughput modular Mac Pro and is said to be planning on a 31.6-inch 6K display to go with it.

The new display has been described as a high-end display aimed at Apple’s pro user base, so it’s likely to be expensive and may not be a suitable replacement for the 4K and 5K displays that are no longer available from Apple.

Related Roundup: Apple Display 6K
Tag: LG

This article, “5K LG UltraFine Display Now Unavailable From Apple in the U.S.” first appeared on MacRumors.com

Discuss this article in our forums

Apple is no longer offering the 5K LG UltraFine Display from the Apple Store in the United States, with the monitor now listed as "Sold Out" and unavailable for pickup in any retail location.

The 5K LG display was in stock and available to be shipped just recently, so the stock shortage happened within the last few days. The listing for the display has not been eliminated from Apple's site, so it's not entirely clear if Apple plans to restock the monitor or if Apple is done selling it for good.


Apple last month removed the online listing for the 4K LG UltraFine Display, and prior to when it was pulled, the 4K monitor had been listed as "Sold Out" for some time, so Apple could be planning to remove the 5K monitor from the site in the near future as well.

The 4K and 5K UltraFine Displays were designed by LG in partnership with Apple and were created to be used with the 2016 13 and 15-inch MacBook Pro models, which supported Thunderbolt 3 for the first time.

The 27-inch 5K UltraFine Display featured a resolution of 5120 x 2880, P3 wide color gamut, and 85W of power delivery for charging a MacBook Pro. Apple was selling it for $1,299. The 27-inch 5K UltraFine display continues to be available from Best Buy, B&H Photo, and Amazon, and it is still listed on LG's website.

Apple is potentially phasing out the LG displays because they're several years old at this point and because there is a new Apple-branded display in the works. Apple is developing a high-end high-throughput modular Mac Pro and is said to be planning on a 31.6-inch 6K display to go with it.

The new display has been described as a high-end display aimed at Apple's pro user base, so it's likely to be expensive and may not be a suitable replacement for the 4K and 5K displays that are no longer available from Apple.

Related Roundup: Apple Display 6K
Tag: LG

This article, "5K LG UltraFine Display Now Unavailable From Apple in the U.S." first appeared on MacRumors.com

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