Cellular iPad Mini Doesn’t Feature mmWave 5G Support, Unlike iPad Pro

Apple this week debuted the sixth-generation iPad mini, cellular models of which can connect to 5G for the first time. However, it’s worth noting that cellular connectivity on the new ‌iPad mini‌ does not extend to support for faster mmWave 5G.



Apple doesn’t maintain a cellular compatibility page for iPad models like it does for its iPhones, so the lack of mmWave 5G support on the ‌iPad mini‌ could surprise some Apple customers. Currently, Apple’s mmWave 5G support is limited to the iPhone 13 lineup, iPhone 12 lineup, and the cellular variants of the 11-inch and 12.9-inch iPad Pro.

On the plus side, like the new ‌iPhone 13‌ models, the ‌iPad mini‌ does support more 5G bands overall than ‌iPhone 12‌ and cellular ‌iPad Pro‌ models, according to Apple, so the ‌iPad mini‌ does have greater 5G coverage around the world than the ‌iPhone 12‌ and ‌iPad Pro‌.

Despite rumors suggesting ‌iPhone 13‌ models would support mmWave 5G in additional countries, support for mmWave remains limited to iPhone and ‌iPad‌ models sold in the United States, so its absence in the new cellular ‌iPad mini‌ is only likely to concern customers who are based there.

mmWave is a set of 5G frequencies that promise ultra-fast speeds at short distances, making it best suited for dense urban areas. By comparison, sub-6GHz 5G is generally slower than mmWave, but the signals travel further, better serving suburban and rural areas. All four ‌iPhone 13‌ models support sub-6GHz outside of the United States, and sub-6GHz networks are more common in countries that have rolled out 5G.

Starting at $499 for the 64GB Wi-Fi-only model, the redesigned sixth-generation ‌iPad mini‌ is available to pre-order now on Apple’s online store. Cellular models are available for $150 more over the base price of each configuration. ‌iPad mini‌ shipping begins Friday, September 24.

Related Roundups: iPad Pro, iPad mini
Tags: 5G, mmWave
Related Forum: iPad

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Apple this week debuted the sixth-generation iPad mini, cellular models of which can connect to 5G for the first time. However, it's worth noting that cellular connectivity on the new ‌iPad mini‌ does not extend to support for faster mmWave 5G.


Apple doesn't maintain a cellular compatibility page for iPad models like it does for its iPhones, so the lack of mmWave 5G support on the ‌iPad mini‌ could surprise some Apple customers. Currently, Apple's mmWave 5G support is limited to the iPhone 13 lineup, iPhone 12 lineup, and the cellular variants of the 11-inch and 12.9-inch iPad Pro.

On the plus side, like the new ‌iPhone 13‌ models, the ‌iPad mini‌ does support more 5G bands overall than ‌iPhone 12‌ and cellular ‌iPad Pro‌ models, according to Apple, so the ‌iPad mini‌ does have greater 5G coverage around the world than the ‌iPhone 12‌ and ‌iPad Pro‌.

Despite rumors suggesting ‌iPhone 13‌ models would support mmWave 5G in additional countries, support for mmWave remains limited to iPhone and ‌iPad‌ models sold in the United States, so its absence in the new cellular ‌iPad mini‌ is only likely to concern customers who are based there.

mmWave is a set of 5G frequencies that promise ultra-fast speeds at short distances, making it best suited for dense urban areas. By comparison, sub-6GHz 5G is generally slower than mmWave, but the signals travel further, better serving suburban and rural areas. All four ‌iPhone 13‌ models support sub-6GHz outside of the United States, and sub-6GHz networks are more common in countries that have rolled out 5G.

Starting at $499 for the 64GB Wi-Fi-only model, the redesigned sixth-generation ‌iPad mini‌ is available to pre-order now on Apple's online store. Cellular models are available for $150 more over the base price of each configuration. ‌iPad mini‌ shipping begins Friday, September 24.
Related Roundups: iPad Pro, iPad mini
Tags: 5G, mmWave
Related Forum: iPad

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mmWave 5G on iPhone 13 Remains Limited to U.S. Models

While it was rumored by multiple sources that iPhone 13 models would support mmWave 5G in additional countries, it turns out that mmWave remains limited to iPhone 13 models sold in the U.S., as was the case with iPhone 12 models.



Apple’s cellular compatibility page confirms that only U.S. models of the iPhone 13 and iPhone 13 Pro support mmWave 5G bands. In addition, on Apple’s product pages for the iPhone 13 and iPhone 13 Pro, the devices are only shown with a mmWave antenna window on the company’s U.S. website, with no mmWave antenna window shown in any other countries.

Apple analyst Ming-Chi Kuo had predicted that iPhone 13 models supporting mmWave 5G would be available in additional markets, such as Canada, Japan, Australia, and select European countries. Taiwanese research firm TrendForce had also expected iPhones with mmWave 5G to be available in more countries, citing its own investigations.

mmWave is a set of 5G frequencies that promise ultra-fast speeds at short distances, making it best suited for dense urban areas. By comparison, sub-6GHz 5G is generally slower than mmWave, but the signals travel further, better serving suburban and rural areas. All four iPhone 13 models support sub-6GHz outside of the United States, and sub-6GHz networks are more common in countries that have rolled out 5G.

iPhone 13 models do support additional 5G bands overall, according to Apple, resulting in the devices having greater 5G coverage around the world.

All four iPhone 13 models will be available to pre-order starting this Friday, September 17 at 5 a.m. Pacific Time in over 30 countries and regions, and all of the devices will launch one week later on Friday, September 24.

Related Roundup: iPhone 13
Tag: mmWave
Related Forum: iPhone

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While it was rumored by multiple sources that iPhone 13 models would support mmWave 5G in additional countries, it turns out that mmWave remains limited to iPhone 13 models sold in the U.S., as was the case with iPhone 12 models.


Apple's cellular compatibility page confirms that only U.S. models of the iPhone 13 and iPhone 13 Pro support mmWave 5G bands. In addition, on Apple's product pages for the iPhone 13 and iPhone 13 Pro, the devices are only shown with a mmWave antenna window on the company's U.S. website, with no mmWave antenna window shown in any other countries.

Apple analyst Ming-Chi Kuo had predicted that iPhone 13 models supporting mmWave 5G would be available in additional markets, such as Canada, Japan, Australia, and select European countries. Taiwanese research firm TrendForce had also expected iPhones with mmWave 5G to be available in more countries, citing its own investigations.

mmWave is a set of 5G frequencies that promise ultra-fast speeds at short distances, making it best suited for dense urban areas. By comparison, sub-6GHz 5G is generally slower than mmWave, but the signals travel further, better serving suburban and rural areas. All four iPhone 13 models support sub-6GHz outside of the United States, and sub-6GHz networks are more common in countries that have rolled out 5G.

iPhone 13 models do support additional 5G bands overall, according to Apple, resulting in the devices having greater 5G coverage around the world.

All four iPhone 13 models will be available to pre-order starting this Friday, September 17 at 5 a.m. Pacific Time in over 30 countries and regions, and all of the devices will launch one week later on Friday, September 24.
Related Roundup: iPhone 13
Tag: mmWave
Related Forum: iPhone

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AT&T Planning Expansion of 5G mmWave to Additional U.S. Airports By the End of 2021

AT&T is planning to bring its 5G mmWave technology to additional airports in the United States by the end of 2021, offering customers access to its “AT&T 5G+” service with faster speeds and lower latency.



In a press release, AT&T says that by the end of 2021, it will have expanded its 5G mmWave technology, which requires more advanced infrastructure compared to typical sub-6GHz 5G, to an additional 7 major airports in the United States. AT&T will offer its 5G+ technology in certain high-traffic parts of the airport, such as gates and concession areas.

Immersing our customers in content and connectivity no matter where they go is important to us and at the core of how we’re building our 5G network. And as our customers start to take off and travel again, their need for 5G connectivity on the go is taking off as well. We’re providing super-fast 5G+ connectivity at the major gate and concession areas inside the Tampa International Airport and have plans to connect 7 more major airports by the end of the year.

AT&T also says that by the end of 2021, it will be offering its 5G mmWave technology to more than 40 cities and venues across the US.

As part of our commitment in March, our teams are deploying our super-fast AT&T 5G+ in more stadiums, airports and cities across the country. Right now, AT&T 5G+ (mmWave 5G) is bringing customers increased speeds and enhanced connectivity in parts of 38 cities and 20 venues across the U.S. By the end of 2021, we expect to offer 5G+ to parts of more than 40 cities and 40 venues. That’s something T-Mobile can’t offer.

There are two separate types of 5G networks, one based on the standard sub-6Ghz frequency and the other on mmWave. mmWave offers significantly faster speeds compared to sub-6GHz but requires more advanced and costly infrastructure. Since the introduction of 5G in the iPhone last year, carriers and governments have boosted up the expansion of 5G technology overall, but mmWave remains to be seen mainstream.

With the iPhone 13 later this fall, Apple plans to expand its 5G mmWave compatible iPhones to countries beyond the United States, incentivizing carriers to adopt support for the technology. Check out our guide on mmWave vs. sub-6GHz to learn more.

Tags: AT&T, mmWave

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AT&T is planning to bring its 5G mmWave technology to additional airports in the United States by the end of 2021, offering customers access to its "AT&T 5G+" service with faster speeds and lower latency.


In a press release, AT&T says that by the end of 2021, it will have expanded its 5G mmWave technology, which requires more advanced infrastructure compared to typical sub-6GHz 5G, to an additional 7 major airports in the United States. AT&T will offer its 5G+ technology in certain high-traffic parts of the airport, such as gates and concession areas.
Immersing our customers in content and connectivity no matter where they go is important to us and at the core of how we're building our 5G network. And as our customers start to take off and travel again, their need for 5G connectivity on the go is taking off as well. We're providing super-fast 5G+ connectivity at the major gate and concession areas inside the Tampa International Airport and have plans to connect 7 more major airports by the end of the year.
AT&T also says that by the end of 2021, it will be offering its 5G mmWave technology to more than 40 cities and venues across the US.
As part of our commitment in March, our teams are deploying our super-fast AT&T 5G+ in more stadiums, airports and cities across the country. Right now, AT&T 5G+ (mmWave 5G) is bringing customers increased speeds and enhanced connectivity in parts of 38 cities and 20 venues across the U.S. By the end of 2021, we expect to offer 5G+ to parts of more than 40 cities and 40 venues. That's something T-Mobile can't offer.
There are two separate types of 5G networks, one based on the standard sub-6Ghz frequency and the other on mmWave. mmWave offers significantly faster speeds compared to sub-6GHz but requires more advanced and costly infrastructure. Since the introduction of 5G in the iPhone last year, carriers and governments have boosted up the expansion of 5G technology overall, but mmWave remains to be seen mainstream.

With the iPhone 13 later this fall, Apple plans to expand its 5G mmWave compatible iPhones to countries beyond the United States, incentivizing carriers to adopt support for the technology. Check out our guide on mmWave vs. sub-6GHz to learn more.
Tags: AT&T, mmWave

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Apple Preparing for Expansion of mmWave iPhone 13 Models This Fall

Ahead of what is expected to be a busy fall season with multiple new product launches, Apple is enlisting additional suppliers of mmWave antennas for the iPhone 13, according to a new report from DigiTimes.



5G mmWave technology debuted in the iPhone 12, and compared to traditional sub-6Ghz, mmWave offers significantly faster speeds but is limited in distance. Currently, mmWave ‌iPhone 12‌ models are only available in the United States, but this fall, Apple is planning a larger expansion of mmWave iPhones to more countries worldwide.

mmWave technology has increased in adoption in cities; however, with the ‌iPhone 13‌ expanding the technology to more customers, it may push countries to adopt mmWave infrastructure faster. DigiTimes reports that Apple is planning to boost the ratio of 5G mmWave iPhones to as many as to 60% of its 2021 iPhone lineup, with shipments reaching 90 million units.

Apple is expected to sharply boost the ratio of 5G mmWave devices to 60% of its new ‌iPhone‌ lineup in 2021, with such models estimated to approach 90 million units, the sources said, adding that each mmWave ‌iPhone‌ will require four AiP modules, significantly driving up demand for AiP substrates.

The ‌iPhone 13‌, expected to be announced between September and October, is rumored to include other significant features such as an improved display, improved cameras, and faster performance. Learn more about everything we’re expecting using our guide.

Related Roundup: iPhone 13
Related Forum: iPhone

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Ahead of what is expected to be a busy fall season with multiple new product launches, Apple is enlisting additional suppliers of mmWave antennas for the iPhone 13, according to a new report from DigiTimes.


5G mmWave technology debuted in the iPhone 12, and compared to traditional sub-6Ghz, mmWave offers significantly faster speeds but is limited in distance. Currently, mmWave ‌iPhone 12‌ models are only available in the United States, but this fall, Apple is planning a larger expansion of mmWave iPhones to more countries worldwide.

mmWave technology has increased in adoption in cities; however, with the ‌iPhone 13‌ expanding the technology to more customers, it may push countries to adopt mmWave infrastructure faster. DigiTimes reports that Apple is planning to boost the ratio of 5G mmWave iPhones to as many as to 60% of its 2021 iPhone lineup, with shipments reaching 90 million units.
Apple is expected to sharply boost the ratio of 5G mmWave devices to 60% of its new ‌iPhone‌ lineup in 2021, with such models estimated to approach 90 million units, the sources said, adding that each mmWave ‌iPhone‌ will require four AiP modules, significantly driving up demand for AiP substrates.
The ‌iPhone 13‌, expected to be announced between September and October, is rumored to include other significant features such as an improved display, improved cameras, and faster performance. Learn more about everything we're expecting using our guide.
Related Roundup: iPhone 13
Related Forum: iPhone

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Apple Maintains 5G Market Lead in Q1 2021 Despite Vivo and Samsung Gains

Apple shipped an estimated 40.4 million iPhone 12 devices during the first quarter of 2021, according to new data shared by Strategy Analytics. The figure suggests Apple has maintained its grip on the global 5G smartphone market, despite indicating a 23% dip compared to the fourth quarter of 2020, when Apple shipped 52.2 million units.



Apple enjoyed booming sales in the 5G market in the three months following the launch of in first 5G-equipped iPhone models, but since then its rivals have upped their game in an increasingly competitive premium smartphone market by releasing new 5G models.

Chinese vendor Oppo took second place in the same quarter, shipping 21.5 million units for a 15.8% market share, up 55% from the fourth quarter of last year. Fellow Sino-mobile maker Vivo managed to ship 19.4 million units, a 62% gain on the last quarter.

Samsung took fourth place with 17 million 5G handsets shipped, earning it just 12.5% of the market but a sizeable 79% growth on Q4 2020. Xiaomi shipped 16.6 million units during the quarter, taking 12.2% of the market, up 41% quarter-over-quarter.


“Samsung is performing well with new 5G models, such as Galaxy S21 5G, S21 ultra 5G and S21+ 5G, in South Korea, North America, and parts of Europe,” said Ville-Petteri Ukonaho, associate director at Strategy Analytics. “Meanwhile, Apple dipped 23% QoQ, following a blowout Q4 2020 where the new 5G iPhone was wildly popular as a gift during the holiday season.

“We forecast global 5G smartphone shipments to reach a record 624 million units for the full-year 2021, soaring from 269 million in full-year 2020.”

All of the iPhones in Apple’s ‌iPhone 12‌ lineup support 5G, but not all 5G networks are equal. There’s the super fast mmWave (millimeter wave) 5G and the slower but more widespread sub-6GHz 5G.

Apple currently only sells the mmWave ‌iPhone 12‌ in the United States, which allocates to only 30-35% of overall ‌‌iPhone 12‌‌ shipments. However, support for sub-6Ghz 5G networks appears to have been enough to fuel the demand for ‌iPhone 12‌ models more globally.

Apple is planning to increase the availability of 5G mmWave capable ‌iPhone‌ models to more countries around the world with the release of the iPhone 13 later this year, offering even more customers access to the faster and newer technology where the infrastructure is increasingly becoming more widely available, according to Apple analyst Ming-Chi Kuo.

Related Roundups: iPhone 12, iPhone 12 Pro
Tags: 5G, mmWave
Related Forum: iPhone

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Apple shipped an estimated 40.4 million iPhone 12 devices during the first quarter of 2021, according to new data shared by Strategy Analytics. The figure suggests Apple has maintained its grip on the global 5G smartphone market, despite indicating a 23% dip compared to the fourth quarter of 2020, when Apple shipped 52.2 million units.


Apple enjoyed booming sales in the 5G market in the three months following the launch of in first 5G-equipped iPhone models, but since then its rivals have upped their game in an increasingly competitive premium smartphone market by releasing new 5G models.

Chinese vendor Oppo took second place in the same quarter, shipping 21.5 million units for a 15.8% market share, up 55% from the fourth quarter of last year. Fellow Sino-mobile maker Vivo managed to ship 19.4 million units, a 62% gain on the last quarter.

Samsung took fourth place with 17 million 5G handsets shipped, earning it just 12.5% of the market but a sizeable 79% growth on Q4 2020. Xiaomi shipped 16.6 million units during the quarter, taking 12.2% of the market, up 41% quarter-over-quarter.

"Samsung is performing well with new 5G models, such as Galaxy S21 5G, S21 ultra 5G and S21+ 5G, in South Korea, North America, and parts of Europe," said Ville-Petteri Ukonaho, associate director at Strategy Analytics. "Meanwhile, Apple dipped 23% QoQ, following a blowout Q4 2020 where the new 5G iPhone was wildly popular as a gift during the holiday season.

"We forecast global 5G smartphone shipments to reach a record 624 million units for the full-year 2021, soaring from 269 million in full-year 2020."
All of the iPhones in Apple's ‌iPhone 12‌ lineup support 5G, but not all 5G networks are equal. There's the super fast mmWave (millimeter wave) 5G and the slower but more widespread sub-6GHz 5G.

Apple currently only sells the mmWave ‌iPhone 12‌ in the United States, which allocates to only 30-35% of overall ‌‌iPhone 12‌‌ shipments. However, support for sub-6Ghz 5G networks appears to have been enough to fuel the demand for ‌iPhone 12‌ models more globally.

Apple is planning to increase the availability of 5G mmWave capable ‌iPhone‌ models to more countries around the world with the release of the iPhone 13 later this year, offering even more customers access to the faster and newer technology where the infrastructure is increasingly becoming more widely available, according to Apple analyst Ming-Chi Kuo.
Related Roundups: iPhone 12, iPhone 12 Pro
Tags: 5G, mmWave
Related Forum: iPhone

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Kuo: iPhone 13 5G mmWave Models to Be Available in More Countries

Apple is planning to increase the availability of 5G mmWave capable iPhone models to more countries around the world with the release of the iPhone 13 later this year, offering even more customers access to the faster and newer technology, according to Apple analyst Ming-Chi Kuo.


In a research note obtained by MacRumors, Kuo says that infrastructure for mmWave technology will increase substantially this year in places like Canada, Japan, Australia, and major European countries. Apple currently sells the mmWave iPhone 12 in the United States, which allocates to only 30-35% of overall ‌iPhone 12‌ shipments.

While 5G smartphone shipments increased significantly in 2020, most of them only supported Sub-6 GHz. We believe that mmWave will create more diverse applications than Sub-6 GHz because of the benefits of faster speed and lower latency. The mmWave model of the ‌iPhone 12‌ only supports the US market, and the shipment allocation of the total ‌iPhone 12‌ is about 30–35%. We predict that the ‌iPhone 13‌ mmWave models will be available in more countries (e.g., Canada, Japan, Australia, and major European mobile operators), so the shipment allocation of ‌iPhone 13‌ mmWave models will increase substantially to 55–60%.

According to the analyst, this year, mmWave capable ‌iPhone 13‌ models will allocate to 55-60% of shipments, a significant year-over-year increase. In terms of design, compared to the standard 6GHz handsets, mmWave ‌iPhone 12‌ models feature a visible antenna on the right side of the device. Kuo expects the same antenna design to continue with the 2021 ‌iPhone‌ lineup.


A DigiTimes report earlier this month echoed similar information as Kuo, stating that Apple is expected to boost shipments of the mmWave ‌iPhone‌ this year. mmWave compared to the standard and more mainstream sub-6GHz technology offers faster speeds, but requires more advanced infrastructure and works in limited range.

Alongside the expanded availability of mmWave, Kuo has previously reported that the ‌iPhone 13‌ will feature a smaller notch, larger batteries, and a 120Hz display for the iPhone 13 Pro and iPhone 13 Pro Max. The new devices are also expected to feature improved cameras thanks to sensor-shift stabilization and improved low-light performance.

Related Roundup: iPhone 13

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Apple is planning to increase the availability of 5G mmWave capable iPhone models to more countries around the world with the release of the iPhone 13 later this year, offering even more customers access to the faster and newer technology, according to Apple analyst Ming-Chi Kuo.


In a research note obtained by MacRumors, Kuo says that infrastructure for mmWave technology will increase substantially this year in places like Canada, Japan, Australia, and major European countries. Apple currently sells the mmWave iPhone 12 in the United States, which allocates to only 30-35% of overall ‌iPhone 12‌ shipments.
While 5G smartphone shipments increased significantly in 2020, most of them only supported Sub-6 GHz. We believe that mmWave will create more diverse applications than Sub-6 GHz because of the benefits of faster speed and lower latency. The mmWave model of the ‌iPhone 12‌ only supports the US market, and the shipment allocation of the total ‌iPhone 12‌ is about 30–35%. We predict that the ‌iPhone 13‌ mmWave models will be available in more countries (e.g., Canada, Japan, Australia, and major European mobile operators), so the shipment allocation of ‌iPhone 13‌ mmWave models will increase substantially to 55–60%.
According to the analyst, this year, mmWave capable ‌iPhone 13‌ models will allocate to 55-60% of shipments, a significant year-over-year increase. In terms of design, compared to the standard 6GHz handsets, mmWave ‌iPhone 12‌ models feature a visible antenna on the right side of the device. Kuo expects the same antenna design to continue with the 2021 ‌iPhone‌ lineup.


A DigiTimes report earlier this month echoed similar information as Kuo, stating that Apple is expected to boost shipments of the mmWave ‌iPhone‌ this year. mmWave compared to the standard and more mainstream sub-6GHz technology offers faster speeds, but requires more advanced infrastructure and works in limited range.

Alongside the expanded availability of mmWave, Kuo has previously reported that the ‌iPhone 13‌ will feature a smaller notch, larger batteries, and a 120Hz display for the iPhone 13 Pro and iPhone 13 Pro Max. The new devices are also expected to feature improved cameras thanks to sensor-shift stabilization and improved low-light performance.
Related Roundup: iPhone 13

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Apple Reportedly Planning Substantial Increase of Shipments for 5G mmWave iPhone Models in 2021

Apple is expected to substantially increase shipments of mmWave enabled iPhone models in 2021 thanks to the increased demand and improved global support for the newer technology, according to DigiTimes.


Apple currently only offers mmWave-enabled iPhone 12 models in the United States and is likely to hold off on offering the option to more countries until the technology is more widely available. According to DigiTimes, that wider availability will take place this year, and as a result, Apple is set to increase shipments of mmWave iPhones.

Apple is expected to boost its 5G mmWave smartphone shipment goal for 2021 as the global economy is on track for stable recovery, and its demand for AiP modules supporting mmWave iPhones will grow remarkably this year, the sources said.

In 2020, Apple lowered its 5G mmWave ‌iPhone‌ shipment projections as construction of the corresponding infrastructure in the US and Europe was severely dragged down by the pandemic.

The ‌iPhone 12‌ was the first ‌iPhone‌ to feature 5G connectivity. 5G connection includes two types of networks, mmWave, which is considered to be the next widely adopted standard that offers super-fast speeds, and a 6GHz connection that is currently the conventional option worldwide. mmWave networks work through higher frequency radio bands that can range from 24Ghz to as high as 40Ghz.

Due to their increased frequency, mmWave is extremely limited in range and requires more advanced and expensive infrastructure compared to 6GHz. Cities and countries around the world are still very much in the early stages of adopting mmWave technology. Even in cities where mmWave technology is present, real-world 5G speeds can differ greatly depending on your proximity to the mmWave tower and the device you’re using.

When we tested Verizon’s mmWave network with a Samsung Galaxy S10 5G smartphone in Chicago in mid-2019, we reached speeds as high as almost 2GBs. Still, we found that speeds vary drastically depending on your location and other factors. You can checkout our full mmWave vs. sub-6GHz guide for more information and insight.

Related Roundup: iPhone 13

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Apple is expected to substantially increase shipments of mmWave enabled iPhone models in 2021 thanks to the increased demand and improved global support for the newer technology, according to DigiTimes.


Apple currently only offers mmWave-enabled iPhone 12 models in the United States and is likely to hold off on offering the option to more countries until the technology is more widely available. According to DigiTimes, that wider availability will take place this year, and as a result, Apple is set to increase shipments of mmWave iPhones.
Apple is expected to boost its 5G mmWave smartphone shipment goal for 2021 as the global economy is on track for stable recovery, and its demand for AiP modules supporting mmWave iPhones will grow remarkably this year, the sources said.

In 2020, Apple lowered its 5G mmWave ‌iPhone‌ shipment projections as construction of the corresponding infrastructure in the US and Europe was severely dragged down by the pandemic.
The ‌iPhone 12‌ was the first ‌iPhone‌ to feature 5G connectivity. 5G connection includes two types of networks, mmWave, which is considered to be the next widely adopted standard that offers super-fast speeds, and a 6GHz connection that is currently the conventional option worldwide. mmWave networks work through higher frequency radio bands that can range from 24Ghz to as high as 40Ghz.

Due to their increased frequency, mmWave is extremely limited in range and requires more advanced and expensive infrastructure compared to 6GHz. Cities and countries around the world are still very much in the early stages of adopting mmWave technology. Even in cities where mmWave technology is present, real-world 5G speeds can differ greatly depending on your proximity to the mmWave tower and the device you're using.

When we tested Verizon's mmWave network with a Samsung Galaxy S10 5G smartphone in Chicago in mid-2019, we reached speeds as high as almost 2GBs. Still, we found that speeds vary drastically depending on your location and other factors. You can checkout our full mmWave vs. sub-6GHz guide for more information and insight.
Related Roundup: iPhone 13

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iPhone 13 May Feature Faster mmWave 5G Connectivity in More Countries

The iPhone 13 lineup may expand faster mmWave 5G connectivity to more countries outside the United States, according to Taiwanese supply chain sources cited by Patently Apple.

The report claims that a Taiwanese company called Qiqi is in the process of receiving a “large order” for mmWave antennas destined for the ‌iPhone 13‌ lineup, which may explain Qiqi chairman Xie Hongbo’s announcement that the company’s 5G-related component shipments would increase significantly this year. Apple’s mmWave antennas are currently manufactured by Japanese company Murata Manufacturing, which will apparently share orders with Qiqi for the ‌iPhone 13‌.

Apple supplier Wistron reportedly invested in Qiqi, becoming its single largest shareholder, thereby helping to bring it into the iPhone supply chain for the first time. Qiqi apparently cooperates closely with Qualcomm on 5G and Wi-Fi 6 components, which was a key factor in the company being selected by Apple for mmWave parts.

In the United States, all iPhone 12 or iPhone 12 Pro models feature both mmWave and sub-6GHz 5G. While mmWave is a faster form of 5G, it is less widespread and penetrates less well than sub-6GHz 5G, so the ‌iPhone 12‌ features the ability to take advantage of both, depending on which is available. Outside the U.S., however, the ‌iPhone 12‌ lineup only features slower sub-6GHz 5G.

The news that Apple is looking to order a large number of mmWave antennas and double its suppliers for the component may signal that ‌iPhone 13‌ models will feature faster mmWave technology in more regions. Countries such as the UK, Germany, Canada, China, and Japan all have growing mmWave networks and would be able to benefit from faster 5G with the ‌iPhone 13‌.

Moreover, the report notes that Qiqi is the market leader in designing antennas for laptops, which Apple could take advantage of to add 5G connectivity to a MacBook at some point in the future. For now, however, Apple’s large order from Qiqi will reportedly support ‌iPhone 13‌ lineup only.

Related Roundup: iPhone 13

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The iPhone 13 lineup may expand faster mmWave 5G connectivity to more countries outside the United States, according to Taiwanese supply chain sources cited by Patently Apple.



The report claims that a Taiwanese company called Qiqi is in the process of receiving a "large order" for mmWave antennas destined for the ‌iPhone 13‌ lineup, which may explain Qiqi chairman Xie Hongbo's announcement that the company's 5G-related component shipments would increase significantly this year. Apple's mmWave antennas are currently manufactured by Japanese company Murata Manufacturing, which will apparently share orders with Qiqi for the ‌iPhone 13‌.

Apple supplier Wistron reportedly invested in Qiqi, becoming its single largest shareholder, thereby helping to bring it into the iPhone supply chain for the first time. Qiqi apparently cooperates closely with Qualcomm on 5G and Wi-Fi 6 components, which was a key factor in the company being selected by Apple for mmWave parts.

In the United States, all iPhone 12 or iPhone 12 Pro models feature both mmWave and sub-6GHz 5G. While mmWave is a faster form of 5G, it is less widespread and penetrates less well than sub-6GHz 5G, so the ‌iPhone 12‌ features the ability to take advantage of both, depending on which is available. Outside the U.S., however, the ‌iPhone 12‌ lineup only features slower sub-6GHz 5G.

The news that Apple is looking to order a large number of mmWave antennas and double its suppliers for the component may signal that ‌iPhone 13‌ models will feature faster mmWave technology in more regions. Countries such as the UK, Germany, Canada, China, and Japan all have growing mmWave networks and would be able to benefit from faster 5G with the ‌iPhone 13‌.

Moreover, the report notes that Qiqi is the market leader in designing antennas for laptops, which Apple could take advantage of to add 5G connectivity to a MacBook at some point in the future. For now, however, Apple's large order from Qiqi will reportedly support ‌iPhone 13‌ lineup only.
Related Roundup: iPhone 13

This article, "iPhone 13 May Feature Faster mmWave 5G Connectivity in More Countries" first appeared on MacRumors.com

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Chris Rock Sells iPhone 12 and mmWave 5G in New Verizon Ad

During its iPhone 12 event this week, Apple expended an unusually long amount of talk time pressing home the benefits of 5G, and even gave the chairman and CEO of Verizon, Hans Vestberg, a segment to explain how “5G just got real.”

“The power of Verizon 5G meets the first iPhone with 5G.”

That same slogan is at the heart of Verizon’s marketing campaign for mmWave 5G on ‌iPhone 12‌, as this latest ad featuring comedian Chris Rock demonstrates.

The entire ‌iPhone 12‌ lineup is compatible with faster 5G networks, but support for high-frequency mmWave bands is limited to models sold in the United States. This includes compatibility with Verizon’s new 5G Ultra Wideband network, which is now available in 55 cities across the country.

mmWave is a set of 5G frequencies that promise ultra-fast speeds at short distances, making it best suited for dense urban areas. By comparison, sub-6GHz 5G is generally slower than mmWave, but the signals travel further, better serving suburban and rural areas. In most countries that offer 5G, sub-6GHz networks are more common.

Apple says ‌iPhone 12‌ models support more 5G bands than any other smartphone, and the devices can automatically adjust to LTE when necessary to save battery life, such as when updates are taking place in the background.

‌iPhone 12‌ and iPhone 12 Pro pre-orders begin today, October 16 at 5 a.m. Pacific Time, with shipments starting Friday, October 23.

Tags: Verizon, 5G, mmWave

This article, “Chris Rock Sells iPhone 12 and mmWave 5G in New Verizon Ad” first appeared on MacRumors.com

Discuss this article in our forums

During its iPhone 12 event this week, Apple expended an unusually long amount of talk time pressing home the benefits of 5G, and even gave the chairman and CEO of Verizon, Hans Vestberg, a segment to explain how "5G just got real."

"The power of Verizon 5G meets the first iPhone with 5G."

That same slogan is at the heart of Verizon's marketing campaign for mmWave 5G on ‌iPhone 12‌, as this latest ad featuring comedian Chris Rock demonstrates.

The entire ‌iPhone 12‌ lineup is compatible with faster 5G networks, but support for high-frequency mmWave bands is limited to models sold in the United States. This includes compatibility with Verizon's new 5G Ultra Wideband network, which is now available in 55 cities across the country.

mmWave is a set of 5G frequencies that promise ultra-fast speeds at short distances, making it best suited for dense urban areas. By comparison, sub-6GHz 5G is generally slower than mmWave, but the signals travel further, better serving suburban and rural areas. In most countries that offer 5G, sub-6GHz networks are more common.

Apple says ‌iPhone 12‌ models support more 5G bands than any other smartphone, and the devices can automatically adjust to LTE when necessary to save battery life, such as when updates are taking place in the background.

‌iPhone 12‌ and iPhone 12 Pro pre-orders begin today, October 16 at 5 a.m. Pacific Time, with shipments starting Friday, October 23.
Tags: Verizon, 5G, mmWave

This article, "Chris Rock Sells iPhone 12 and mmWave 5G in New Verizon Ad" first appeared on MacRumors.com

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mmWave vs. Sub-6GHz 5G iPhones: What’s the Difference?

All of the iPhones in Apple’s iPhone 12 lineup will have Qualcomm modems that support 5G, but potential buyers need to know that not all 5G networks are equal. There’s the super fast mmWave (millimeter wave) 5G and the slower but more widespread Sub-6GHz 5G.


There have been mixed rumors about which ‌iPhone 12‌ models will support which 5G spectrums, but it appears that the fastest 5G technology could be limited to the higher-end ‌iPhone 12‌ Pro models, or even just the 6.7-inch version. This guide highlights the differences between mmWave and Sub-6GHz 5G to help you decide between the ‌iPhone 12‌ and 12 Pro models.

mmWave vs. Sub6GHz Explained

5G is fifth-generation cellular wireless, succeeding the 4G LTE networks that we’ve been connecting to since 2010. There are two kinds of 5G networks: mmWave, which is the super-fast 5G that most people are talking about when they talk about 5G speed improvements, and sub-6GHz, the 5G that most people are going to experience for the time being.

Smartphones transmit sound and data over the air using electromagnetic radio frequencies, with these frequencies organized into different frequency bands. Some of these bands have more capacity than others and are able to deliver information faster, which is the case with mmWave.

mmWave refers to higher frequency radio bands ranging from 24GHz to 40GHz, and Sub-6GHz refers to mid and low-frequency bands under 6GHz. Low-frequency bands are under 1GHz, while mid-bands range from 3.4GHz to 6GHz and are not considered “mmWave.”

mmWave 5G networks are ultra-fast, but they’re also ultra-short range. To use mmWave technology, you need to be within about a block of a 5G tower, which isn’t feasible in suburban and rural areas. mmWave spectrum is also blocked and obscured by doors, windows, trees, and walls, further limiting its available range, and because it requires so many towers for coverage, it’s expensive for carriers to deploy.

Because of its limited range, accessing mmWave spectrum has only become possible over the course of the last few years due to technological advancements like Massive MIMO, adaptable beamforming, and miniaturization of complex antenna processing functions, and mmWave is still nascent technology that’s in the process of being adopted.

mmWave’s limitations make it best suited for dense, urban areas, or specific targeted spots like airports or concerts. In rural and suburban areas, mmWave technology is not practical because it doesn’t have enough range, which is where the Sub-6GHz networks come in. Sub-6GHz 5G is faster than 4G, but it doesn’t offer the blazing-fast speeds that you can get with mmWave. Since it has a longer range and can better penetrate objects, it’s much more affordable for carriers to implement.

With an iPhone that supports both mmWave and Sub-6GHz, you will be able to take advantage of lightning-quick 5G speeds where mmWave technology is available, while other 5G coverage will be similar to the more modern LTE networks that have been rolling out over the last few years. With an ‌iPhone‌ that only has Sub-6GHz, you’ll be able to use the most widely available 5G networks, but will be blocked off from the faster mmWave that might be available in cities.

Over time, low-band and mid-band 5G speeds should get much quicker just like LTE did as it evolved, but those incredibly fast speeds that people expect from 5G are mmWave speeds and are much more limited in availability.

Speed Differences

mmWave spectrum can deliver theoretical speeds as high as 5Gb/s, which is much, much faster than the speeds achievable with LTE connectivity.

In practice, early mmWave networks have been delivering speeds that max out at around 2Gb/s, but as we found when we tested Verizon’s mmWave network with a Samsung smartphone in Chicago in mid-2019, speeds vary drastically based on your position and proximity to the nearest 5G tower.

LTE networks are much slower. In fact, Tom’s Guide recently looked at LTE speeds and saw top download speeds of 53Mb/s on Verizon, but most carriers were closer to 35Mb/s.

Sub-6GHz networks fall somewhere in between mmWave and LTE speeds. Sprint’s Sub-6GHz network (which is now T-Mobile’s), for example, has seen maximum speeds of about 200Mb/s. A good LTE connection can hit those speeds, but realistically, Sub-6GHz 5G is faster than most people will see with LTE, though not reaching those incredible speeds possible with mmWave.

OpenSignal in August 2020 analyzed real-world 5G speeds in multiple countries (using smartphones that currently support 5G), and the speed results for the United States might be surprising to those who are expecting major speed gains from 5G. Average download speeds on 5GHz networks were around 50.9Mb/s, compared to 28.9 Mb/s on LTE, and that’s because most of the coverage in the U.S. is Sub-6GHz at this time.


Other countries have more advanced 5G networks and can provide some insight into the speed improvements we could realistically see within the next few years. On average, OpenSignal found 5G connectivity to be between 1.4x and 14.3x faster than 4G, but this data does not separate mmWave 5G from Sub-6GHz 5G.

One other interesting metric OpenSignal noted was time connected to 5G networks. In the United States, smartphone owners with devices that support 5G spent just 19.3 percent of the time connected to 5G networks because of their limited availability.


Apple employees that have been testing the 5G iPhones recently (and confidentially) told Bloomberg that the 5G speeds have been disappointing as the current 5G networks are not “improving connection speeds much.” Most people who are expecting their iPhones to deliver super-fast mmWave speeds will likely end up similarly disappointed when they find that mmWave networks just aren’t available in most places.

mmWave Availability

In the United States, all three major carriers are testing mmWave support, but it’s still available in a limited capacity. It’s in select major cities and not even citywide – it’s limited to select neighborhoods.

With Sub-6GHz, it’s already more widespread with AT&T and T-Mobile rolling out lower-spectrum 5G networks that are available to many more customers.

Which iPhones Will Support mmWave?

Early ‌iPhone 12‌ rumors confirmed that all 2020 iPhones will support 5G networks, but the question of mmWave vs. Sub-6GHz support is something that’s still not entirely clear. mmWave 5G technology is expensive and it’s power-intensive, both of which mean that it’s unlikely to be a blanket feature included in all ‌iPhone‌ models.

Rumors now suggest that the higher-end ‌iPhone 12‌ Pro models may be the only ‌iPhone‌ models to support mmWave 5G technology, and only in certain countries, because it doesn’t make sense to roll out the feature in places where mmWave spectrum just isn’t in use.

One recent rumor from Fast Company says that mmWave support will be limited to the 6.7-inch ‌iPhone‌ because it’s the only ‌iPhone‌ that has the space for the necessary hardware and a larger battery, so it’s possible a single ‌iPhone‌ will have mmWave connectivity to start.

Potential mmWave iPhone Delays

All of Apple’s iPhones are launching later than expected, something that Apple confirmed in late July, but even with the delay, rumors indicate we’re going to see a staggered launch.

The more affordable ‌iPhone 12‌ models are expected to come out ahead of the ‌iPhone 12‌ Pro models, and since rumors suggest the ‌iPhone 12‌ Pro models will have mmWave support, it sounds like the “Pro” mmWave iPhones are going to come out after the standard ‌iPhone 12‌ models limited to Sub-6GHz connectivity.

Do I Need the mmWave 5G Connectivity?

In a nutshell, no, most people don’t need mmWave connectivity, nor will most people even access to it on a regular basis for the next several years to come.

Full mmWave 5G connectivity is still in the process of rolling out, and it continues to be limited in scope. It’s only available in major cities in the United States, and in most of those major cities, it’s not available everywhere and is in select areas.

The transition from 4G to 5G started in 2019 and there’s still a ways to go, so most people are going to be able to get by without mmWave speeds. To know whether mmWave technology is worth it for you personally, it’s a good idea to look up your carrier and see if mmWave spectrum has even rolled out where you live.

Verizon, for example, has 5G in cities like Atlanta, San Diego, San Jose, New York, Providence, Chicago, Omaha, Salt Lake City, Phoenix, and more, but connectivity is limited by specific neighborhoods and landmarks.

Looking just at one city, San Diego, reliable 5G is available in Mission Valley, and other than that, parts of Linda Vista, Kensington, and Banker’s Hill, which is an extremely limited area. The same is true of most other cities where 5G is being tested. Verizon has only rolled out mmWave tech at this time, and its sub-6GHz networks are still in the works.

AT&T has rolled out “5G” to 80 million customers in 80 markets, but most of this 5G coverage is not mmWave coverage, and, in fact, is a faster version of LTE that isn’t even technically real 5G. AT&T’s mmWave network (which it calls 5G+) became available in March 2020 and it can be found in select areas in 35 cities in the United States. Details are available on AT&T’s site, but mmWave coverage is as limited as Verizon’s right now.

T-Mobile is mostly focusing on Sub-6GHz 5G spectrum, and will limit mmWave technology to dense urban areas.

5G information for the major carriers in the United States is linked below so you can see the coverage for your particular carrier in your area.

If you don’t spend a lot of time in one of the specific neighborhoods in one of the cities where your carrier offers 5G technology, you’re not going to benefit from mmWave speeds and purchasing a mmWave ‌iPhone‌ should not be a major concern at this time. If you do live in a major urban area with a lot of mmWave 5G towers, you could see benefits from an ‌iPhone‌ that supports the faster technology.

Carriers are, of course, going to continue building out their mmWave networks and in a few years it could be much more widespread, which is a consideration for those who take future-proofing into account when making an ‌iPhone‌ purchase. But even years from now, mmWave is still likely to be limited in scope and available only in more urban areas and Sub-6GHz is the 5G most people will know and connect to.

Keep in mind that some carriers are charging more for 5G right now. Verizon, for example, is pricing 5G plans $10 higher than comparative 4G unlimited plans. AT&T and T-Mobile aren’t charging higher prices yet, but that could change as 5G further expands.

Guide Feedback

Have questions about mmWave vs. Sub-6GHz 5G connectivity or want to offer feedback on this guide? Send us an email here. If you want to know more about Apple’s 5G iPhone plans, make sure to check out our 5G iPhone guide and our iPhone 12 roundup.

Related Roundup: iPhone 12

This article, “mmWave vs. Sub-6GHz 5G iPhones: What’s the Difference?” first appeared on MacRumors.com

Discuss this article in our forums

All of the iPhones in Apple's iPhone 12 lineup will have Qualcomm modems that support 5G, but potential buyers need to know that not all 5G networks are equal. There's the super fast mmWave (millimeter wave) 5G and the slower but more widespread Sub-6GHz 5G.


There have been mixed rumors about which ‌iPhone 12‌ models will support which 5G spectrums, but it appears that the fastest 5G technology could be limited to the higher-end ‌iPhone 12‌ Pro models, or even just the 6.7-inch version. This guide highlights the differences between mmWave and Sub-6GHz 5G to help you decide between the ‌iPhone 12‌ and 12 Pro models.

mmWave vs. Sub6GHz Explained


5G is fifth-generation cellular wireless, succeeding the 4G LTE networks that we've been connecting to since 2010. There are two kinds of 5G networks: mmWave, which is the super-fast 5G that most people are talking about when they talk about 5G speed improvements, and sub-6GHz, the 5G that most people are going to experience for the time being.

Smartphones transmit sound and data over the air using electromagnetic radio frequencies, with these frequencies organized into different frequency bands. Some of these bands have more capacity than others and are able to deliver information faster, which is the case with mmWave.

mmWave refers to higher frequency radio bands ranging from 24GHz to 40GHz, and Sub-6GHz refers to mid and low-frequency bands under 6GHz. Low-frequency bands are under 1GHz, while mid-bands range from 3.4GHz to 6GHz and are not considered "mmWave."

mmWave 5G networks are ultra-fast, but they're also ultra-short range. To use mmWave technology, you need to be within about a block of a 5G tower, which isn't feasible in suburban and rural areas. mmWave spectrum is also blocked and obscured by doors, windows, trees, and walls, further limiting its available range, and because it requires so many towers for coverage, it's expensive for carriers to deploy.

Because of its limited range, accessing mmWave spectrum has only become possible over the course of the last few years due to technological advancements like Massive MIMO, adaptable beamforming, and miniaturization of complex antenna processing functions, and mmWave is still nascent technology that's in the process of being adopted.

mmWave's limitations make it best suited for dense, urban areas, or specific targeted spots like airports or concerts. In rural and suburban areas, mmWave technology is not practical because it doesn't have enough range, which is where the Sub-6GHz networks come in. Sub-6GHz 5G is faster than 4G, but it doesn't offer the blazing-fast speeds that you can get with mmWave. Since it has a longer range and can better penetrate objects, it's much more affordable for carriers to implement.

With an iPhone that supports both mmWave and Sub-6GHz, you will be able to take advantage of lightning-quick 5G speeds where mmWave technology is available, while other 5G coverage will be similar to the more modern LTE networks that have been rolling out over the last few years. With an ‌iPhone‌ that only has Sub-6GHz, you'll be able to use the most widely available 5G networks, but will be blocked off from the faster mmWave that might be available in cities.

Over time, low-band and mid-band 5G speeds should get much quicker just like LTE did as it evolved, but those incredibly fast speeds that people expect from 5G are mmWave speeds and are much more limited in availability.

Speed Differences


mmWave spectrum can deliver theoretical speeds as high as 5Gb/s, which is much, much faster than the speeds achievable with LTE connectivity.

In practice, early mmWave networks have been delivering speeds that max out at around 2Gb/s, but as we found when we tested Verizon's mmWave network with a Samsung smartphone in Chicago in mid-2019, speeds vary drastically based on your position and proximity to the nearest 5G tower.


LTE networks are much slower. In fact, Tom's Guide recently looked at LTE speeds and saw top download speeds of 53Mb/s on Verizon, but most carriers were closer to 35Mb/s.

Sub-6GHz networks fall somewhere in between mmWave and LTE speeds. Sprint's Sub-6GHz network (which is now T-Mobile's), for example, has seen maximum speeds of about 200Mb/s. A good LTE connection can hit those speeds, but realistically, Sub-6GHz 5G is faster than most people will see with LTE, though not reaching those incredible speeds possible with mmWave.

OpenSignal in August 2020 analyzed real-world 5G speeds in multiple countries (using smartphones that currently support 5G), and the speed results for the United States might be surprising to those who are expecting major speed gains from 5G. Average download speeds on 5GHz networks were around 50.9Mb/s, compared to 28.9 Mb/s on LTE, and that's because most of the coverage in the U.S. is Sub-6GHz at this time.


Other countries have more advanced 5G networks and can provide some insight into the speed improvements we could realistically see within the next few years. On average, OpenSignal found 5G connectivity to be between 1.4x and 14.3x faster than 4G, but this data does not separate mmWave 5G from Sub-6GHz 5G.

One other interesting metric OpenSignal noted was time connected to 5G networks. In the United States, smartphone owners with devices that support 5G spent just 19.3 percent of the time connected to 5G networks because of their limited availability.


Apple employees that have been testing the 5G iPhones recently (and confidentially) told Bloomberg that the 5G speeds have been disappointing as the current 5G networks are not "improving connection speeds much." Most people who are expecting their iPhones to deliver super-fast mmWave speeds will likely end up similarly disappointed when they find that mmWave networks just aren't available in most places.

mmWave Availability


In the United States, all three major carriers are testing mmWave support, but it's still available in a limited capacity. It's in select major cities and not even citywide - it's limited to select neighborhoods.

With Sub-6GHz, it's already more widespread with AT&T and T-Mobile rolling out lower-spectrum 5G networks that are available to many more customers.

Which iPhones Will Support mmWave?


Early ‌iPhone 12‌ rumors confirmed that all 2020 iPhones will support 5G networks, but the question of mmWave vs. Sub-6GHz support is something that's still not entirely clear. mmWave 5G technology is expensive and it's power-intensive, both of which mean that it's unlikely to be a blanket feature included in all ‌iPhone‌ models.

Rumors now suggest that the higher-end ‌iPhone 12‌ Pro models may be the only ‌iPhone‌ models to support mmWave 5G technology, and only in certain countries, because it doesn't make sense to roll out the feature in places where mmWave spectrum just isn't in use.

One recent rumor from Fast Company says that mmWave support will be limited to the 6.7-inch ‌iPhone‌ because it's the only ‌iPhone‌ that has the space for the necessary hardware and a larger battery, so it's possible a single ‌iPhone‌ will have mmWave connectivity to start.

Potential mmWave iPhone Delays


All of Apple's iPhones are launching later than expected, something that Apple confirmed in late July, but even with the delay, rumors indicate we're going to see a staggered launch.

The more affordable ‌iPhone 12‌ models are expected to come out ahead of the ‌iPhone 12‌ Pro models, and since rumors suggest the ‌iPhone 12‌ Pro models will have mmWave support, it sounds like the "Pro" mmWave iPhones are going to come out after the standard ‌iPhone 12‌ models limited to Sub-6GHz connectivity.

Do I Need the mmWave 5G Connectivity?


In a nutshell, no, most people don't need mmWave connectivity, nor will most people even access to it on a regular basis for the next several years to come.

Full mmWave 5G connectivity is still in the process of rolling out, and it continues to be limited in scope. It's only available in major cities in the United States, and in most of those major cities, it's not available everywhere and is in select areas.

The transition from 4G to 5G started in 2019 and there's still a ways to go, so most people are going to be able to get by without mmWave speeds. To know whether mmWave technology is worth it for you personally, it's a good idea to look up your carrier and see if mmWave spectrum has even rolled out where you live.

Verizon, for example, has 5G in cities like Atlanta, San Diego, San Jose, New York, Providence, Chicago, Omaha, Salt Lake City, Phoenix, and more, but connectivity is limited by specific neighborhoods and landmarks.

Looking just at one city, San Diego, reliable 5G is available in Mission Valley, and other than that, parts of Linda Vista, Kensington, and Banker's Hill, which is an extremely limited area. The same is true of most other cities where 5G is being tested. Verizon has only rolled out mmWave tech at this time, and its sub-6GHz networks are still in the works.

AT&T has rolled out "5G" to 80 million customers in 80 markets, but most of this 5G coverage is not mmWave coverage, and, in fact, is a faster version of LTE that isn't even technically real 5G. AT&T's mmWave network (which it calls 5G+) became available in March 2020 and it can be found in select areas in 35 cities in the United States. Details are available on AT&T's site, but mmWave coverage is as limited as Verizon's right now.

T-Mobile is mostly focusing on Sub-6GHz 5G spectrum, and will limit mmWave technology to dense urban areas.

5G information for the major carriers in the United States is linked below so you can see the coverage for your particular carrier in your area.

If you don't spend a lot of time in one of the specific neighborhoods in one of the cities where your carrier offers 5G technology, you're not going to benefit from mmWave speeds and purchasing a mmWave ‌iPhone‌ should not be a major concern at this time. If you do live in a major urban area with a lot of mmWave 5G towers, you could see benefits from an ‌iPhone‌ that supports the faster technology.

Carriers are, of course, going to continue building out their mmWave networks and in a few years it could be much more widespread, which is a consideration for those who take future-proofing into account when making an ‌iPhone‌ purchase. But even years from now, mmWave is still likely to be limited in scope and available only in more urban areas and Sub-6GHz is the 5G most people will know and connect to.

Keep in mind that some carriers are charging more for 5G right now. Verizon, for example, is pricing 5G plans $10 higher than comparative 4G unlimited plans. AT&T and T-Mobile aren't charging higher prices yet, but that could change as 5G further expands.

Guide Feedback


Have questions about mmWave vs. Sub-6GHz 5G connectivity or want to offer feedback on this guide? Send us an email here. If you want to know more about Apple's 5G iPhone plans, make sure to check out our 5G iPhone guide and our iPhone 12 roundup.
Related Roundup: iPhone 12

This article, "mmWave vs. Sub-6GHz 5G iPhones: What's the Difference?" first appeared on MacRumors.com

Discuss this article in our forums