Fujifilm Releases Webcam Software for macOS

Fujifilm has released its software for Mac that enables its X-series mirrorless cameras to be used as high-quality webcams.


The Fujifilm X Webcam tool was initially released for Windows PCs in May. Fujifilm later said it would offer a Mac version in mid-July due to the “overwhelming response” of its customers when it released the app for PC.

Fujifilm, Canon and Panasonic have developed software that brings webcam functionality to their cameras. The cameras are connected via a USB cable and offer a sharper picture for video calls.

Fujifilm has expanded the number of X-series mirrorless cameras that work with its Fujifilm X Webcam software, with the X-T200 and X-A7 now supported. Other cameras already supported include the X-H1, X-Pro2, X-Pro3, X-T2, X-T3, and X-T4. Fujifilm X Webcam also works with all three GFX medium format cameras.

Fujifilm lists the X Webcam software as compatible with Chrome and Edge browsers, with support for Google Meet, Microsoft Teams, Zoom, Skype, and Messenger Rooms.
This article, “Fujifilm Releases Webcam Software for macOS” first appeared on MacRumors.com

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Fujifilm has released its software for Mac that enables its X-series mirrorless cameras to be used as high-quality webcams.


The Fujifilm X Webcam tool was initially released for Windows PCs in May. Fujifilm later said it would offer a Mac version in mid-July due to the "overwhelming response" of its customers when it released the app for PC.

Fujifilm, Canon and Panasonic have developed software that brings webcam functionality to their cameras. The cameras are connected via a USB cable and offer a sharper picture for video calls.

Fujifilm has expanded the number of X-series mirrorless cameras that work with its Fujifilm X Webcam software, with the X-T200 and X-A7 now supported. Other cameras already supported include the X-H1, X-Pro2, X-Pro3, X-T2, X-T3, and X-T4. Fujifilm X Webcam also works with all three GFX medium format cameras.

Fujifilm lists the X Webcam software as compatible with Chrome and Edge browsers, with support for Google Meet, Microsoft Teams, Zoom, Skype, and Messenger Rooms.
This article, "Fujifilm Releases Webcam Software for macOS" first appeared on MacRumors.com

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Apple’s Independent iPhone Repair Program Adds More U.S. Locations and Expands to Canada and Europe

Apple today announced that over 140 more repair businesses are now participating in its Independent Repair Provider Program in the United States. The program, launched in August 2019, is also being expanded to Canada and Europe.


The program allows independent repair shops like uBreakiFix to offer certified out-of-warranty service for iPhones, such as display and battery replacements. Participating businesses receive access to the same Apple genuine parts, tools, training, repair manuals, and diagnostics as Apple Stores and Apple Authorized Service Providers.

Independent repair shops need to have an Apple-certified technician who can perform the repairs to qualify for the program. Apply here.

“When a customer needs a repair, we want them to have a range of options that not only suits their needs but also guarantees safety and quality so their iPhone can be used for as long as possible,” said Apple COO Jeff Williams.

To verify that a company participates in the program, visit this page.
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Apple today announced that over 140 more repair businesses are now participating in its Independent Repair Provider Program in the United States. The program, launched in August 2019, is also being expanded to Canada and Europe.


The program allows independent repair shops like uBreakiFix to offer certified out-of-warranty service for iPhones, such as display and battery replacements. Participating businesses receive access to the same Apple genuine parts, tools, training, repair manuals, and diagnostics as Apple Stores and Apple Authorized Service Providers.

Independent repair shops need to have an Apple-certified technician who can perform the repairs to qualify for the program. Apply here.

"When a customer needs a repair, we want them to have a range of options that not only suits their needs but also guarantees safety and quality so their iPhone can be used for as long as possible," said Apple COO Jeff Williams.

To verify that a company participates in the program, visit this page.
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Hands-On With Caviar’s Modified ‘CyberPhone’ iPhone Designed to Look Like a Tesla Cybertruck

Caviar, a company known for creating outlandish and lavish iPhone casing modifications, has been working on an ‌iPhone‌ design that’s modeled after Tesla’s Cybertruck. We have a prototype of the CyberPhone on hand, and checked it out in our latest YouTube video.

Subscribe to the MacRumors YouTube channel for more videos.

The CyberPhone Caviar has designed is created from titanium and has an angled design reminiscent of Tesla’s truck. Caviar has a few versions for sale, but the base pricing starts at $6,910, so this is not a phone for the everyday buyer.

We don’t have the high-end titanium version to test out, but rather an aluminum model that’s a less expensive test version than the version shipping out to customers. The official version of the CyberPhone features a back panel made from titanium with a PVC covering, with cutouts and buttons that allow the ‌iPhone‌ to operate as normal while sporting the Cybertruck-style design.

Since the extra casing adds a good bit of bulk to the ‌iPhone‌, there’s a unique SIM ejection tool to get the SIM tray out from the deep crevice of the casing. There’s a camera cutout at the back for the square-shaped camera setup of the ‌iPhone‌, which features Caviar branding.

In our video, you may notice a crack in the glass part of the CyberPhone’s casing, so it’s clearly not as indestructible as the Tesla Cybertruck. Elon Musk was able to break the window of the Cybertruck during its unveiling, however, so maybe Caviar is just aiming for authenticity. The non-glass portion of the case feels more durable, but it’s also super heavy.

There are also quite a few scratches around the bumper of the CyberPhone and again, this is aluminum, but titanium is also prone to scratching. Visible scratches are not exactly desirable on a phone that costs as much as some cars.

We have the CyberPhone Light, but the standard version, priced at about $7,680, has a folding cover that comes down to cover the display when the phone isn’t in use and also serves as a stand, but that’s not available in this model so we can’t demo it.

Modified iPhones like this are more impractical than anything else and attractive to a limited subset of buyers, but it’s sometimes fun to take a look at the kind of crazy things ‌iPhone‌ modifiers are doing. We have no idea who buys these kinds of devices, but there must be some market for them because Caviar and other companies keep coming out with ever more fanciful designs.
This article, “Hands-On With Caviar’s Modified ‘CyberPhone’ iPhone Designed to Look Like a Tesla Cybertruck” first appeared on MacRumors.com

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Caviar, a company known for creating outlandish and lavish iPhone casing modifications, has been working on an ‌iPhone‌ design that's modeled after Tesla's Cybertruck. We have a prototype of the CyberPhone on hand, and checked it out in our latest YouTube video.

Subscribe to the MacRumors YouTube channel for more videos.

The CyberPhone Caviar has designed is created from titanium and has an angled design reminiscent of Tesla's truck. Caviar has a few versions for sale, but the base pricing starts at $6,910, so this is not a phone for the everyday buyer.

We don't have the high-end titanium version to test out, but rather an aluminum model that's a less expensive test version than the version shipping out to customers. The official version of the CyberPhone features a back panel made from titanium with a PVC covering, with cutouts and buttons that allow the ‌iPhone‌ to operate as normal while sporting the Cybertruck-style design.

Since the extra casing adds a good bit of bulk to the ‌iPhone‌, there's a unique SIM ejection tool to get the SIM tray out from the deep crevice of the casing. There's a camera cutout at the back for the square-shaped camera setup of the ‌iPhone‌, which features Caviar branding.

In our video, you may notice a crack in the glass part of the CyberPhone's casing, so it's clearly not as indestructible as the Tesla Cybertruck. Elon Musk was able to break the window of the Cybertruck during its unveiling, however, so maybe Caviar is just aiming for authenticity. The non-glass portion of the case feels more durable, but it's also super heavy.

There are also quite a few scratches around the bumper of the CyberPhone and again, this is aluminum, but titanium is also prone to scratching. Visible scratches are not exactly desirable on a phone that costs as much as some cars.

We have the CyberPhone Light, but the standard version, priced at about $7,680, has a folding cover that comes down to cover the display when the phone isn't in use and also serves as a stand, but that's not available in this model so we can't demo it.


Modified iPhones like this are more impractical than anything else and attractive to a limited subset of buyers, but it's sometimes fun to take a look at the kind of crazy things ‌iPhone‌ modifiers are doing. We have no idea who buys these kinds of devices, but there must be some market for them because Caviar and other companies keep coming out with ever more fanciful designs.
This article, "Hands-On With Caviar's Modified 'CyberPhone' iPhone Designed to Look Like a Tesla Cybertruck" first appeared on MacRumors.com

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WWDC20 Rumor Report Card: Leaked iOS 14 Features, Arm-Based Macs, and More

WWDC was held online this year, but it was still packed with announcements, including iOS 14, iPadOS 14, macOS Big Sur, watchOS 7, tvOS 14, and Apple confirming its long-rumored plans to transition to its own custom-designed processors for future Macs. Sadly, there was no sight of a redesigned iMac, but that is still on the table for later this year.


With so many rumors shared every week, it can be hard to remember exactly what was leaked ahead of a particular Apple event. For that reason, we have put together a list of accurate and inaccurate rumors in relation to everything announced this week. The list is not comprehensive, but it covers many of the biggest leaks and rumors that surfaced.

Accurate Rumors

Inaccurate Rumors

Looking ahead, there are still some rumors that remain to be seen, such as blood oxygen monitoring on Apple Watch Series 6 models in the fall and what proved to be a controversial claim that Xcode is coming to the iPad Pro by next year.
This article, “WWDC20 Rumor Report Card: Leaked iOS 14 Features, Arm-Based Macs, and More” first appeared on MacRumors.com

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WWDC was held online this year, but it was still packed with announcements, including iOS 14, iPadOS 14, macOS Big Sur, watchOS 7, tvOS 14, and Apple confirming its long-rumored plans to transition to its own custom-designed processors for future Macs. Sadly, there was no sight of a redesigned iMac, but that is still on the table for later this year.


With so many rumors shared every week, it can be hard to remember exactly what was leaked ahead of a particular Apple event. For that reason, we have put together a list of accurate and inaccurate rumors in relation to everything announced this week. The list is not comprehensive, but it covers many of the biggest leaks and rumors that surfaced.

Accurate Rumors


Inaccurate Rumors

Looking ahead, there are still some rumors that remain to be seen, such as blood oxygen monitoring on Apple Watch Series 6 models in the fall and what proved to be a controversial claim that Xcode is coming to the iPad Pro by next year.
This article, "WWDC20 Rumor Report Card: Leaked iOS 14 Features, Arm-Based Macs, and More" first appeared on MacRumors.com

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Face ID and Touch ID Logins Coming to Websites With Safari Web Authentication API

Apple allows Touch ID and Face ID to be used in lieu of a password to access sensitive apps like those for banking or password management, and in the future, Face ID and ‌Touch ID‌ will also be able to be used for authentication purposes when logging into a website.


Apple outlines the feature in a WWDC20 engineering session called “Meet Face ID and ‌Touch ID‌ for the web,” which covers how web developers can use Face ID and ‌Touch ID‌ on their websites with the Web Authentication API.

An initial login on a website that supports the feature will require a username, passcode, and two-factor authentication code to be entered, but after that, Face ID or ‌Touch ID‌ can handle the login process. Signing in this way will require users to click on the sign in button, after which Safari will ask for confirmation. With the confirmation, a Face ID (or ‌Touch ID‌) scan is done, and the user is able to log in.

Apple says Face ID and ‌Touch ID‌ authentication is beneficial because it’s frictionless, simple, and secure. The online session described it as “phishing resistant.”

But more importantly, it is Phishing-resistant. Safari will only allow public credentials created by this API to be used within the Web site they were created, and the credential can never be exported out from the authenticater they were created in as well. This means that once a public credential has been provisioned, there is no way for a user to accidentally divulge it to another party. Cool right?! This is the overview of the Web Authentication standard.

Additional detail about the feature, including instructions on how web developers can enable it, can be found in the full video along with the accompanying resources.
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Apple allows Touch ID and Face ID to be used in lieu of a password to access sensitive apps like those for banking or password management, and in the future, Face ID and ‌Touch ID‌ will also be able to be used for authentication purposes when logging into a website.


Apple outlines the feature in a WWDC20 engineering session called "Meet Face ID and ‌Touch ID‌ for the web," which covers how web developers can use Face ID and ‌Touch ID‌ on their websites with the Web Authentication API.

An initial login on a website that supports the feature will require a username, passcode, and two-factor authentication code to be entered, but after that, Face ID or ‌Touch ID‌ can handle the login process. Signing in this way will require users to click on the sign in button, after which Safari will ask for confirmation. With the confirmation, a Face ID (or ‌Touch ID‌) scan is done, and the user is able to log in.

Apple says Face ID and ‌Touch ID‌ authentication is beneficial because it's frictionless, simple, and secure. The online session described it as "phishing resistant."
But more importantly, it is Phishing-resistant. Safari will only allow public credentials created by this API to be used within the Web site they were created, and the credential can never be exported out from the authenticater they were created in as well. This means that once a public credential has been provisioned, there is no way for a user to accidentally divulge it to another party. Cool right?! This is the overview of the Web Authentication standard.
Additional detail about the feature, including instructions on how web developers can enable it, can be found in the full video along with the accompanying resources.
This article, "Face ID and Touch ID Logins Coming to Websites With Safari Web Authentication API" first appeared on MacRumors.com

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Apple’s $500 Developer Program Includes Tools and Resources for Transitioning to Apple Silicon, Plus a Loaner A12Z-Based Mac Mini

To help developers prepare for the Mac transition from Intel processors to Apple Silicon, Apple has launched a Universal App Quick Start Program, which “includes all the tools, resources, and support you need to build, test, and optimize your next-generation Universal apps for macOS Big Sur.”


The program requires a brief application, with limited availability and priority for developers with an existing macOS application. The program costs $500 and includes access to beta software, developer labs, private discussion forum, technical support, and other resources.

On the hardware side, participants will receive exclusive access to a Developer Transition Kit (DTK), which resembles a Mac mini but uses Apple’s A12Z Bionic chip from the latest iPad Pro as its brains. In addition to the A12Z Bionic, the DTK includes 16GB of RAM, a 512GB SSD, a pair of 10 Gbps USB-C ports, a pair of 5 Gbps USB-A ports, and an HDMI 2.0 port. Thunderbolt 3 support is not included.

On the communications side, 802.11ac Wi-Fi, Bluetooth 5.0, and Gigabit Ethernet are also supported. An FCC filing for the DTK reveals that it carries an Apple model number of A2330, which was the lone new Mac model number that appeared in the Eurasian Economic Commission’s database earlier this month.

Notably, the DTK remains the property of Apple and must be returned at the conclusion of the program. Participants must also agree to a number of restrictions against tearing the machine down, using it for work other than development related to the program, or renting or leasing it out.

The Universal App Quick Start Program is similar to one Apple launched for the transition from PowerPC chips to Intel processors back in 2005. In that case, the program cost was $999 and participants were provided with loaner machines based on the Power Mac G5. As with the new DTK machines, those Macs also had to be returned at the end of the program, although Apple did provide participants with a free first-generation Intel iMac upon returning the developer kit as bonus.

Apple has made no promise of a similar bonus this time, so it remains to be seen whether program participants will get any hardware to keep.
This article, “Apple’s $500 Developer Program Includes Tools and Resources for Transitioning to Apple Silicon, Plus a Loaner A12Z-Based Mac Mini” first appeared on MacRumors.com

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To help developers prepare for the Mac transition from Intel processors to Apple Silicon, Apple has launched a Universal App Quick Start Program, which "includes all the tools, resources, and support you need to build, test, and optimize your next-generation Universal apps for macOS Big Sur."


The program requires a brief application, with limited availability and priority for developers with an existing macOS application. The program costs $500 and includes access to beta software, developer labs, private discussion forum, technical support, and other resources.

On the hardware side, participants will receive exclusive access to a Developer Transition Kit (DTK), which resembles a Mac mini but uses Apple's A12Z Bionic chip from the latest iPad Pro as its brains. In addition to the A12Z Bionic, the DTK includes 16GB of RAM, a 512GB SSD, a pair of 10 Gbps USB-C ports, a pair of 5 Gbps USB-A ports, and an HDMI 2.0 port. Thunderbolt 3 support is not included.

On the communications side, 802.11ac Wi-Fi, Bluetooth 5.0, and Gigabit Ethernet are also supported. An FCC filing for the DTK reveals that it carries an Apple model number of A2330, which was the lone new Mac model number that appeared in the Eurasian Economic Commission's database earlier this month.

Notably, the DTK remains the property of Apple and must be returned at the conclusion of the program. Participants must also agree to a number of restrictions against tearing the machine down, using it for work other than development related to the program, or renting or leasing it out.

The Universal App Quick Start Program is similar to one Apple launched for the transition from PowerPC chips to Intel processors back in 2005. In that case, the program cost was $999 and participants were provided with loaner machines based on the Power Mac G5. As with the new DTK machines, those Macs also had to be returned at the end of the program, although Apple did provide participants with a free first-generation Intel iMac upon returning the developer kit as bonus.

Apple has made no promise of a similar bonus this time, so it remains to be seen whether program participants will get any hardware to keep.
This article, "Apple's $500 Developer Program Includes Tools and Resources for Transitioning to Apple Silicon, Plus a Loaner A12Z-Based Mac Mini" first appeared on MacRumors.com

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Apple Previews Big Update to Safari on Mac, Featuring New Privacy Tools, Built-in Translation, Improved Tabs, and More

Apple today during its WWDC keynote unveiled macOS Big Sur, which comes with a big update to Apple’s native Safari browser.


Tabs have been redesigned to make navigating with Safari faster and more powerful by showing more tabs onscreen, displaying favicons by default to easily identify open tabs, and giving users a quick preview of a page by simply hovering over the tab.

A new Privacy Report button in the toolbar gives users insight into how sites are using their connection, and which trackers have been blocked. Users can choose when and which websites a Safari extension can work with, and tools like data breach password monitoring never reveal users’ password information.


Extensions support for Safari is adopting new standard, so users can bring over extensions from other browsers. Users can also give extensions access just for a day, on a certain website, or for every website. In addition, the Mac App Store has a new extensions category that includes editorial spotlights and top charts.


Meanwhile, native-translation capabilities are now built into Safari, and the browser can detect and translate entire webpages from seven languages. There’s also a customizable Start Page with background image support that extends to Reading List and iCloud Tabs.

Aside from features, Safari is getting faster. Apple says it now loads frequently visited sites an average of 50 percent faster than Chrome.
This article, “Apple Previews Big Update to Safari on Mac, Featuring New Privacy Tools, Built-in Translation, Improved Tabs, and More” first appeared on MacRumors.com

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Apple today during its WWDC keynote unveiled macOS Big Sur, which comes with a big update to Apple's native Safari browser.


Tabs have been redesigned to make navigating with Safari faster and more powerful by showing more tabs onscreen, displaying favicons by default to easily identify open tabs, and giving users a quick preview of a page by simply hovering over the tab.

A new Privacy Report button in the toolbar gives users insight into how sites are using their connection, and which trackers have been blocked. Users can choose when and which websites a Safari extension can work with, and tools like data breach password monitoring never reveal users' password information.


Extensions support for Safari is adopting new standard, so users can bring over extensions from other browsers. Users can also give extensions access just for a day, on a certain website, or for every website. In addition, the Mac App Store has a new extensions category that includes editorial spotlights and top charts.


Meanwhile, native-translation capabilities are now built into Safari, and the browser can detect and translate entire webpages from seven languages. There's also a customizable Start Page with background image support that extends to Reading List and iCloud Tabs.

Aside from features, Safari is getting faster. Apple says it now loads frequently visited sites an average of 50 percent faster than Chrome.
This article, "Apple Previews Big Update to Safari on Mac, Featuring New Privacy Tools, Built-in Translation, Improved Tabs, and More" first appeared on MacRumors.com

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See How the Apple Watch Ejects Water in Slow Motion

The Apple Watch, which can be worn while swimming and doing other water-based activities, has a neat feature that’s designed to use the speakers to eject water, protecting the internal components.

The Slow Mo Guys, known for science and technology-related videos that take advantage of slow-motion cameras, today took a look at how the ‌Apple Watch‌ water ejecting feature works, featuring it up close and slowed down.

As the video demonstrates, the ‌Apple Watch‌ goes through 10 cycles where the speakers vibrate to push out all of the water inside. In slow motion, the force with which the water is expelled can be seen, and it’s an impressive visual.

When planning to use the ‌Apple Watch‌ in the water or when a swimming workout is initiated, users can set a water lock feature that’s designed to prevent the display from activating when exposed to water droplets.

When turned off, the feature, enabled through the Control Center, triggers the function that expels water from the speaker when the Digital Crown of the ‌Apple Watch‌ is turned. The water lock and water ejecting features are available on the Apple Watch Series 2 and later.
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The Apple Watch, which can be worn while swimming and doing other water-based activities, has a neat feature that's designed to use the speakers to eject water, protecting the internal components.


The Slow Mo Guys, known for science and technology-related videos that take advantage of slow-motion cameras, today took a look at how the ‌Apple Watch‌ water ejecting feature works, featuring it up close and slowed down.

As the video demonstrates, the ‌Apple Watch‌ goes through 10 cycles where the speakers vibrate to push out all of the water inside. In slow motion, the force with which the water is expelled can be seen, and it's an impressive visual.

When planning to use the ‌Apple Watch‌ in the water or when a swimming workout is initiated, users can set a water lock feature that's designed to prevent the display from activating when exposed to water droplets.

When turned off, the feature, enabled through the Control Center, triggers the function that expels water from the speaker when the Digital Crown of the ‌Apple Watch‌ is turned. The water lock and water ejecting features are available on the Apple Watch Series 2 and later.
This article, "See How the Apple Watch Ejects Water in Slow Motion" first appeared on MacRumors.com

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Some 2020 MacBook Pro and MacBook Air Users Experiencing Issues With USB 2.0 Accessories

MacBook Air and MacBook Pro owners who have one of the new 13-inch 2020 models released earlier this year appear to be experiencing problems with USB 2.0 accessories that connect to their machines though a hub or adapter.


There are a number of complaints about the issue on the MacRumors forums, Reddit, and the Apple Support Communities. Affected customers appear to be seeing devices connected to the Mac randomly disconnect, as explained below by a MacRumors reader.

At random times the USB devices connected to the mac though a usb-c hub would just lose connection and stop working all at the same time. This happened with two different USB-C hubs (both expensive, one of them is Satechi which was recommended in many threads), so I am leaning towards ruling out the hubs being at fault.

I’m connecting a few things in the hub – HDMI for an an external monitor, USB audio interface (powered by the mac) and a mouse. When the issue occurs, the mouse and the USB audio interface stop working, but the HDMI connection continues to work without issues, each time.

The issue happens at random moments and there are no steps to reproduce it. It seems to be happening more often when at least two usb devices are connected at the same time.

There are many other similar complaints about disconnection and freezing issues when using USB 2.0 accessories that connect to a Mac through a hub, though there seems to be no clear pattern as to which accessories are affected or when the issue occurs, making it difficult to determine what could be causing the disconnects.

MacBook owners have run into connectivity problems with all kinds of devices that require a USB-A connection, including mice, keyboards, and other accessories. Multiple hubs have been tested, which suggests that the issue is not caused by a particular brand of hub, and it also appears that most of the complaints are limited to USB 2.0 accessories rather than USB 3.0 and 3.1 accessories.

SMC resets, safe mode, Disk Utility repairs, different user logins, and operating system reinstalls have all been unsuccessful addressing the bug, which suggests that it may be something that Apple needs to fix in a future software update, if it is a software problem.

A Reddit user found that USB 2.0 devices that become unresponsive remain indefinitely in the System Information even if unplugged from a hub, while USB 3.0 devices behave properly, so this is one possible cause. He was able to solve the problem with a Thunderbolt CalDigit hub, but whether that fix will work for all impacted machines is unknown, and CalDigit Thunderbolt hubs are pricey.

Apple has a USB 2.0 issue with either the chipset they are using, or a Catalina bug regarding the handling and refreshing of USB 2.0 devices.

However this can be worked around.

USB-C hubs vary in their functionality and there are two types:

1. USB hubs that are transparent proxies

– The Anker, Satechi and StarTech hubs

2. USB hubs that are terminating proxies

– The CalDigit hub and anonymous person on the internet and their monitor hub

Transparent proxies take the USB 2.0 input and present it as USB 2.0 to the ‌MacBook Pro‌. The Mac or Catalina then will do something wrong and the USB 2.0 devices will freeze / become unresponsive at some point (minutes or hours after being attached).

Terminating proxies take the USB 2.0 input, terminate it, and present it as a fresh input that is USB 3.0 to the ‌MacBook Pro‌. Everything is good in this scenario.

Multiple ‌MacBook Pro‌ and ‌MacBook Air‌ owners have contacted Apple so Apple may be aware of the issue and could have a fix in the works. Apple has been replacing some affected machines with new models, but users report that the problem persists even when a new Mac is provided.
This article, “Some 2020 MacBook Pro and MacBook Air Users Experiencing Issues With USB 2.0 Accessories” first appeared on MacRumors.com

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MacBook Air and MacBook Pro owners who have one of the new 13-inch 2020 models released earlier this year appear to be experiencing problems with USB 2.0 accessories that connect to their machines though a hub or adapter.


There are a number of complaints about the issue on the MacRumors forums, Reddit, and the Apple Support Communities. Affected customers appear to be seeing devices connected to the Mac randomly disconnect, as explained below by a MacRumors reader.
At random times the USB devices connected to the mac though a usb-c hub would just lose connection and stop working all at the same time. This happened with two different USB-C hubs (both expensive, one of them is Satechi which was recommended in many threads), so I am leaning towards ruling out the hubs being at fault.

I'm connecting a few things in the hub - HDMI for an an external monitor, USB audio interface (powered by the mac) and a mouse. When the issue occurs, the mouse and the USB audio interface stop working, but the HDMI connection continues to work without issues, each time.

The issue happens at random moments and there are no steps to reproduce it. It seems to be happening more often when at least two usb devices are connected at the same time.
There are many other similar complaints about disconnection and freezing issues when using USB 2.0 accessories that connect to a Mac through a hub, though there seems to be no clear pattern as to which accessories are affected or when the issue occurs, making it difficult to determine what could be causing the disconnects.

MacBook owners have run into connectivity problems with all kinds of devices that require a USB-A connection, including mice, keyboards, and other accessories. Multiple hubs have been tested, which suggests that the issue is not caused by a particular brand of hub, and it also appears that most of the complaints are limited to USB 2.0 accessories rather than USB 3.0 and 3.1 accessories.

SMC resets, safe mode, Disk Utility repairs, different user logins, and operating system reinstalls have all been unsuccessful addressing the bug, which suggests that it may be something that Apple needs to fix in a future software update, if it is a software problem.

A Reddit user found that USB 2.0 devices that become unresponsive remain indefinitely in the System Information even if unplugged from a hub, while USB 3.0 devices behave properly, so this is one possible cause. He was able to solve the problem with a Thunderbolt CalDigit hub, but whether that fix will work for all impacted machines is unknown, and CalDigit Thunderbolt hubs are pricey.
Apple has a USB 2.0 issue with either the chipset they are using, or a Catalina bug regarding the handling and refreshing of USB 2.0 devices.

However this can be worked around.

USB-C hubs vary in their functionality and there are two types:

1. USB hubs that are transparent proxies
- The Anker, Satechi and StarTech hubs
2. USB hubs that are terminating proxies
- The CalDigit hub and anonymous person on the internet and their monitor hub

Transparent proxies take the USB 2.0 input and present it as USB 2.0 to the ‌MacBook Pro‌. The Mac or Catalina then will do something wrong and the USB 2.0 devices will freeze / become unresponsive at some point (minutes or hours after being attached).

Terminating proxies take the USB 2.0 input, terminate it, and present it as a fresh input that is USB 3.0 to the ‌MacBook Pro‌. Everything is good in this scenario.
Multiple ‌MacBook Pro‌ and ‌MacBook Air‌ owners have contacted Apple so Apple may be aware of the issue and could have a fix in the works. Apple has been replacing some affected machines with new models, but users report that the problem persists even when a new Mac is provided.
This article, "Some 2020 MacBook Pro and MacBook Air Users Experiencing Issues With USB 2.0 Accessories" first appeared on MacRumors.com

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Twitter Rolls Out New Voice Tweets Feature

Twitter today announced the launch of a new feature that’s designed to allow people to tweet with their voice, sending voice-based messages instead of text.


Twitter is where you go to talk about what’s happening. Over the years, photos, videos, gifs, and extra characters have allowed you to add your own flair and personality to your conversations. But sometimes 280 characters aren’t enough and some conversational nuances are lost in translation. So starting today, we’re testing a new feature that will add a more human touch to the way we use Twitter – your very own voice.

Voice tweets can be created by opening up the tweet composer and tapping the new wavelengths icon. From there, a screen opens with a user’s Twitter icon, which can be tapped to begin a recording.

Twitter users can capture up to 140 seconds of audio, but continuous recording is possible and longer audio will create multiple voice tweets.


Voice tweets will appear on the Twitter timeline just like other tweets. Listening to a voice tweet can be done by tapping on the image, and on iOS, playback starts in an audio player that’s docked at the bottom of the timeline users can continue to scroll through Twitter.

Twitter is testing voice tweets with a limited number of people on Twitter for iOS at the current time, but the company says that in the coming weeks, everyone on iOS should be able to send voice tweets.
This article, “Twitter Rolls Out New Voice Tweets Feature” first appeared on MacRumors.com

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Twitter today announced the launch of a new feature that's designed to allow people to tweet with their voice, sending voice-based messages instead of text.

Twitter is where you go to talk about what's happening. Over the years, photos, videos, gifs, and extra characters have allowed you to add your own flair and personality to your conversations. But sometimes 280 characters aren't enough and some conversational nuances are lost in translation. So starting today, we're testing a new feature that will add a more human touch to the way we use Twitter - your very own voice.
Voice tweets can be created by opening up the tweet composer and tapping the new wavelengths icon. From there, a screen opens with a user's Twitter icon, which can be tapped to begin a recording.

Twitter users can capture up to 140 seconds of audio, but continuous recording is possible and longer audio will create multiple voice tweets.


Voice tweets will appear on the Twitter timeline just like other tweets. Listening to a voice tweet can be done by tapping on the image, and on iOS, playback starts in an audio player that's docked at the bottom of the timeline users can continue to scroll through Twitter.

Twitter is testing voice tweets with a limited number of people on Twitter for iOS at the current time, but the company says that in the coming weeks, everyone on iOS should be able to send voice tweets.
This article, "Twitter Rolls Out New Voice Tweets Feature" first appeared on MacRumors.com

Discuss this article in our forums