Sensor-Shift Camera Stabilization Rumored to Expand to Entire iPhone 13 Lineup

The entire iPhone 13 lineup will feature sensor-shift optical image stabilization, compared to only the iPhone 12 Pro Max among current models, according to a brief story preview shared today by Taiwanese publication DigiTimes.


“Apple’s next-generation iPhones slated for launch in the second half of 2021 will all come with sensor-shift stabilization technology, according to industry sources,” the story preview reads. The full report should be published by tomorrow, and we’ll update our coverage if there are any further details worth noting.

Korean publication ETNews shared a similar report earlier this week claiming that at least two iPhone 13 models will be equipped with sensor-shift stabilization, with LG Innotek expected to remain the supplier of the necessary components.

Apple first introduced sensor-shift stabilization on the Wide lens of the iPhone 12 Pro Max. The technology stabilizes the camera’s sensor instead of the lens for even greater image stabilization and improved photo quality. It’s unclear if sensor-shift stabilization would remain limited to the Wide lens on all iPhone 13 models.

“Until now, sensor‑shift stabilization was only on DSLR cameras,” says Apple’s website. “This is the first time it’s been adapted for iPhone. Whether you’re shooting video of your kids as you chase them around the park or holding your iPhone out the window on a bumpy road, you’ll get more precise stabilization than ever.”

Earlier this month, DigiTimes reported that the LiDAR Scanner will also be expanded to the entire iPhone 13 lineup, while mmWave 5G is expected to become available on iPhone 13 models sold outside of the United States.

Related Roundup: iPhone 13

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The entire iPhone 13 lineup will feature sensor-shift optical image stabilization, compared to only the iPhone 12 Pro Max among current models, according to a brief story preview shared today by Taiwanese publication DigiTimes.


"Apple's next-generation iPhones slated for launch in the second half of 2021 will all come with sensor-shift stabilization technology, according to industry sources," the story preview reads. The full report should be published by tomorrow, and we'll update our coverage if there are any further details worth noting.

Korean publication ETNews shared a similar report earlier this week claiming that at least two iPhone 13 models will be equipped with sensor-shift stabilization, with LG Innotek expected to remain the supplier of the necessary components.

Apple first introduced sensor-shift stabilization on the Wide lens of the iPhone 12 Pro Max. The technology stabilizes the camera's sensor instead of the lens for even greater image stabilization and improved photo quality. It's unclear if sensor-shift stabilization would remain limited to the Wide lens on all iPhone 13 models.

"Until now, sensor‑shift stabilization was only on DSLR cameras," says Apple's website. "This is the first time it's been adapted for iPhone. Whether you're shooting video of your kids as you chase them around the park or holding your iPhone out the window on a bumpy road, you'll get more precise stabilization than ever."

Earlier this month, DigiTimes reported that the LiDAR Scanner will also be expanded to the entire iPhone 13 lineup, while mmWave 5G is expected to become available on iPhone 13 models sold outside of the United States.
Related Roundup: iPhone 13

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LG Considering Exit From Smartphone Business, Halts LCD Production for iPhone

LG is considering exiting the smartphone business entirely amid declining shipments and accrued losses of $4.5 billion over the past five years (via The Korea Herald).

LG CEO Kwon Bong-Seok cautioned staff earlier today that the company is re-evaluating its presence in the smartphone industry:

Since the competition in the global market for mobile devices is getting fiercer, it is about time for LG to make a cold judgment and the best choice. The company is considering all possible measures, including sale, withdrawal and downsizing of the smartphone business.

He added that regardless of any change, the company will retain its current employees from the smartphone division and reassign them elsewhere.

LG has seen rapidly declining smartphone shipments in recent years, and the company is now believed to hold a market share of just two percent. LG has posted major financial shortfalls in its smartphone segment for 23 consecutive quarters, reaching a total loss of $4.5 billion.

When taking office as CEO in January 2020, Bong-Seok pledged to turn the company’s smartphone business around. The CEO’s latest comments therefore appear to be an admission of failure to make the segment profitable.

At the same time, LG is reportedly ending its production of LCD displays for the iPhone, according to The Elec. LG Display had previously attempted to supply LCDs for the second-generation iPhone SE, but failed to meet Apple’s requirements, leading to Japan Display and Sharp being selected as suppliers instead. LG’s factory that previously made the components will be repurposed to manufacture automobile display panels.

Earlier this month, LG unveiled one of the world’s first rollable smartphones at CES, as the company has endeavored to explore unusual designs to lure in customers. The future of this device, and other LG smartphones such as the LG Velvet and LG Wing, are now highly uncertain.

Tags: LG, LG Display

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LG is considering exiting the smartphone business entirely amid declining shipments and accrued losses of $4.5 billion over the past five years (via The Korea Herald).



LG CEO Kwon Bong-Seok cautioned staff earlier today that the company is re-evaluating its presence in the smartphone industry:

Since the competition in the global market for mobile devices is getting fiercer, it is about time for LG to make a cold judgment and the best choice. The company is considering all possible measures, including sale, withdrawal and downsizing of the smartphone business.


He added that regardless of any change, the company will retain its current employees from the smartphone division and reassign them elsewhere.

LG has seen rapidly declining smartphone shipments in recent years, and the company is now believed to hold a market share of just two percent. LG has posted major financial shortfalls in its smartphone segment for 23 consecutive quarters, reaching a total loss of $4.5 billion.

When taking office as CEO in January 2020, Bong-Seok pledged to turn the company's smartphone business around. The CEO's latest comments therefore appear to be an admission of failure to make the segment profitable.

At the same time, LG is reportedly ending its production of LCD displays for the iPhone, according to The Elec. LG Display had previously attempted to supply LCDs for the second-generation iPhone SE, but failed to meet Apple's requirements, leading to Japan Display and Sharp being selected as suppliers instead. LG's factory that previously made the components will be repurposed to manufacture automobile display panels.

Earlier this month, LG unveiled one of the world's first rollable smartphones at CES, as the company has endeavored to explore unusual designs to lure in customers. The future of this device, and other LG smartphones such as the LG Velvet and LG Wing, are now highly uncertain.
Tags: LG, LG Display

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Apple Said to Be Driving Market Growth of Ultra Wideband Applications

Apple’s inclusion of Ultra Wideband chips in its devices has driven growth in research into the technology and its potential applications, according to a new report by DigiTimes.


Ultra Wideband is a short-range, low-power radio technology that is able to provide more precise indoor positioning than Bluetooth LE and Wi-Fi. The distance between two UWB devices can be measured precisely by calculating the time that it takes for a radio wave to pass between them.

Apple’s iPhones have included it in the last two series via its custom U1 chip, with other Apple products also supporting UWB. According to today’s report, Apple’s promotion of Ultra Wideband has been the driving factor behind increased take-up of the technology:

Apple has adopted the UWB technology for iPhone 11 and 12 series, Apple Watch 6 and HomePod mini, while Samsung Electronics has launched UWB-enabled smartphones including the Galaxy Note 20 Ultra and the Galaxy Flip 2 and China-based Xiaomi has also offered a UWB-enabled smartphone model, Digitimes Research indicated.

Apple’s HomePod 14.4 beta is set to introduce new ‌HomePod mini‌ music handoff functionality that takes advantage of the U1 chip in the device: When an ‌iPhone‌ is near a ‌‌HomePod mini‌‌, it begins a soft haptic touch rhythm that gets faster and faster as the ‌‌iPhone‌‌ gets closer, until the interface to transfer a song between the ‌‌HomePod mini‌‌ and the ‌‌iPhone‌‌ opens.

This functionality will make handoff quicker and more reliable on a ‌‌HomePod mini‌‌ and an ‌iPhone 11‌ or iPhone 12, thanks to the U1 chips that let the devices better understand where they are in relation to one another.

Apple’s rumored “AirTags” will also feature ultra wideband tech, according to analyst Ming-Chi Kuo, while Tile is said to be planning to introduce an upgraded series of item trackers that include a UWB chip for more precise tracking.

Apple opened up its U1 chip to developers in iOS 14 with a “Nearby Interaction” framework, which can stream distance and relative direction between U1-equipped devices, paving the way for new spatial-related user experiences.

Just last week, BMW announced future plans to roll out Digital Key Plus, an enhanced version of Apple’s Car Keys feature that incorporates Ultra Wideband technology, enabling drivers to unlock and start their vehicle without needing to take their ‌iPhone‌ out of their pocket or bag.

But with more and more products including the technology, there have been some notable (and surprising) exceptions: Apple’s 2020 iPad Pro and new AirPods Max headphones don’t include a U1 chip and therefore won’t be compatible with future potential Ultra Wideband applications.

This article, “Apple Said to Be Driving Market Growth of Ultra Wideband Applications” first appeared on MacRumors.com

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Apple's inclusion of Ultra Wideband chips in its devices has driven growth in research into the technology and its potential applications, according to a new report by DigiTimes.


Ultra Wideband is a short-range, low-power radio technology that is able to provide more precise indoor positioning than Bluetooth LE and Wi-Fi. The distance between two UWB devices can be measured precisely by calculating the time that it takes for a radio wave to pass between them.

Apple's iPhones have included it in the last two series via its custom U1 chip, with other Apple products also supporting UWB. According to today's report, Apple's promotion of Ultra Wideband has been the driving factor behind increased take-up of the technology:
Apple has adopted the UWB technology for iPhone 11 and 12 series, Apple Watch 6 and HomePod mini, while Samsung Electronics has launched UWB-enabled smartphones including the Galaxy Note 20 Ultra and the Galaxy Flip 2 and China-based Xiaomi has also offered a UWB-enabled smartphone model, Digitimes Research indicated.
Apple's HomePod 14.4 beta is set to introduce new ‌HomePod mini‌ music handoff functionality that takes advantage of the U1 chip in the device: When an ‌iPhone‌ is near a ‌‌HomePod mini‌‌, it begins a soft haptic touch rhythm that gets faster and faster as the ‌‌iPhone‌‌ gets closer, until the interface to transfer a song between the ‌‌HomePod mini‌‌ and the ‌‌iPhone‌‌ opens.

This functionality will make handoff quicker and more reliable on a ‌‌HomePod mini‌‌ and an ‌iPhone 11‌ or iPhone 12, thanks to the U1 chips that let the devices better understand where they are in relation to one another.

Apple's rumored "AirTags" will also feature ultra wideband tech, according to analyst Ming-Chi Kuo, while Tile is said to be planning to introduce an upgraded series of item trackers that include a UWB chip for more precise tracking.

Apple opened up its U1 chip to developers in iOS 14 with a "Nearby Interaction" framework, which can stream distance and relative direction between U1-equipped devices, paving the way for new spatial-related user experiences.

Just last week, BMW announced future plans to roll out Digital Key Plus, an enhanced version of Apple's Car Keys feature that incorporates Ultra Wideband technology, enabling drivers to unlock and start their vehicle without needing to take their ‌iPhone‌ out of their pocket or bag.

But with more and more products including the technology, there have been some notable (and surprising) exceptions: Apple's 2020 iPad Pro and new AirPods Max headphones don't include a U1 chip and therefore won't be compatible with future potential Ultra Wideband applications.
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Netflix ‘Shuffle Play’ Feature Rolling Out to All Users Later This Year

Netflix is planning to roll out a new “Shuffle Play” feature to users this year following a successful period of testing, the company announced Tuesday during its Q4 2020 earnings.

Image via TechCrunch

Noting the feature briefly during the call, Netflix said it would give “members the ability to choose to instantly watch a title chosen just for them, versus browse.”

According to TechCrunch, Shuffle Play places a big button on the Netflix home screen under the user’s profile icon. When the button’s selected, Netflix randomly plays content that the service’s personalization algorithms think the user will like.

Content can include a movie that has recently been played, something saved to the user’s watch list, or a title that is similar to something they’ve already watched, for example.

A variation of the feature has also been spotted in the TV app’s sidebar navigation menu. When selected, the question “Not sure what to watch?” is displayed and the page goes on to explain how Shuffle Play works.

Shuffle Play is still only being tested on TVs right now, but the company said the feature, which may yet take another name, will reach all users worldwide sometime in the first half of 2021.

Shuffle Play is just the latest feature that Netflix has tested in search of a better way to connect users to something to watch. In April 2019 it began testing a feature on mobile that allowed users to “Play a Popular Episode” of certain TV shows, without having to scroll through and pick which one they want to watch.

Tag: Netflix

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Netflix is planning to roll out a new "Shuffle Play" feature to users this year following a successful period of testing, the company announced Tuesday during its Q4 2020 earnings.

Image via TechCrunch

Noting the feature briefly during the call, Netflix said it would give "members the ability to choose to instantly watch a title chosen just for them, versus browse."

According to TechCrunch, Shuffle Play places a big button on the Netflix home screen under the user's profile icon. When the button's selected, Netflix randomly plays content that the service's personalization algorithms think the user will like.

Content can include a movie that has recently been played, something saved to the user's watch list, or a title that is similar to something they've already watched, for example.

A variation of the feature has also been spotted in the TV app's sidebar navigation menu. When selected, the question "Not sure what to watch?" is displayed and the page goes on to explain how Shuffle Play works.

Shuffle Play is still only being tested on TVs right now, but the company said the feature, which may yet take another name, will reach all users worldwide sometime in the first half of 2021.

Shuffle Play is just the latest feature that Netflix has tested in search of a better way to connect users to something to watch. In April 2019 it began testing a feature on mobile that allowed users to "Play a Popular Episode" of certain TV shows, without having to scroll through and pick which one they want to watch.
Tag: Netflix

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$50 Beats Flex Wireless Earphones Now Available in Two More Colors

Back in October, Apple introduced Beats Flex wireless earphones, which offer improvements over the previous BeatsX earphones yet come with a much lower $49.99 price tag.


The wireless Bluetooth earphones have a cord between the two earpieces that drapes around the next and provides access to some physical controls.

They were initially only available in Beats Black and Yuzu Yellow color options. However, as spotted by 9to5Mac, two additional colors – Smoke Gray and Flame Blue – are now available to order on the Apple online store.

Beats Flex include Apple’s W1 chip that supports quick pairing with iOS devices, iCloud syncing for seamless switching between devices, Audio Sharing to allow two sets of compatible Beats or AirPods earphones to listen to connect to the same device, and more.

They offer up to 12 hours of listening time on a single charge, and they recharge using USB-C to help provide maximum compatibility for Apple and Android users. A 10-minute Fast Fuel charge when the battery level is low will provide up to 1.5 hours of playback.

Beats Flex are the cheapest way to get into Apple’s wireless earphone ecosystem, which is especially important now that Apple is no longer including earphones in the box with its iPhones.

This article, “$50 Beats Flex Wireless Earphones Now Available in Two More Colors” first appeared on MacRumors.com

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Back in October, Apple introduced Beats Flex wireless earphones, which offer improvements over the previous BeatsX earphones yet come with a much lower $49.99 price tag.


The wireless Bluetooth earphones have a cord between the two earpieces that drapes around the next and provides access to some physical controls.

They were initially only available in Beats Black and Yuzu Yellow color options. However, as spotted by 9to5Mac, two additional colors – Smoke Gray and Flame Blue – are now available to order on the Apple online store.

Beats Flex include Apple's W1 chip that supports quick pairing with iOS devices, iCloud syncing for seamless switching between devices, Audio Sharing to allow two sets of compatible Beats or AirPods earphones to listen to connect to the same device, and more.

They offer up to 12 hours of listening time on a single charge, and they recharge using USB-C to help provide maximum compatibility for Apple and Android users. A 10-minute Fast Fuel charge when the battery level is low will provide up to 1.5 hours of playback.

Beats Flex are the cheapest way to get into Apple's wireless earphone ecosystem, which is especially important now that Apple is no longer including earphones in the box with its iPhones.
This article, "$50 Beats Flex Wireless Earphones Now Available in Two More Colors" first appeared on MacRumors.com

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How to Link Shazam to Your Spotify Account

Shazam is an Apple-owned popular service that can identify the names and lyrics of songs, music videos, TV shows, and more, simply by listening to and deciphering whatever is playing.


After you’ve identified songs in the Shazam app by pressing the big Shazam button, you can use streaming services like Spotify and Apple Music to listen to them. In this article, we’re going to show you how to link Shazam to your Spotify account.

  1. First, make sure you have the Spotify and Shazam apps downloaded on your iPhone, iPad, or iPod touch, otherwise you won’t be able to connect the two services. Both apps are available on the App Store.

  2. Next, launch the Shazam app on your iOS device, then swipe up to My Music from the main Shazam screen and tap the Settings button (the cog icon in the upper left corner of the screen).

    Shazam
  3. In Settings, tap Connect next to Spotify, then when Spotify opens, scroll down and tap the green Agree button to authorize the link.

    Shazam

Once you’ve connected Shazam to your Spotify account, you can listen to your Shazams in full. In Shazam, tap the play button next to a song to listen to a 30-second preview. To listen to the whole song in Spotify, tap Spotify next to a Shazam or when viewing a Shazam in fullscreen.

Shazam
You can also get Shazam to create a “My Shazam Tracks” playlist in Spotify. Simply go into Shazam’s Settings and toggle the switch next to Sync Shazams to Spotify to the green ON position. Once that’s done, you’ll be able to listen to all your previous Shazams in the “My Shazam Tracks” playlist in the Spotify app.

This article, “How to Link Shazam to Your Spotify Account” first appeared on MacRumors.com

Discuss this article in our forums

Shazam is an Apple-owned popular service that can identify the names and lyrics of songs, music videos, TV shows, and more, simply by listening to and deciphering whatever is playing.


After you've identified songs in the Shazam app by pressing the big Shazam button, you can use streaming services like Spotify and Apple Music to listen to them. In this article, we're going to show you how to link Shazam to your Spotify account.

  1. First, make sure you have the Spotify and Shazam apps downloaded on your iPhone, iPad, or iPod touch, otherwise you won't be able to connect the two services. Both apps are available on the App Store.

  2. Next, launch the Shazam app on your iOS device, then swipe up to My Music from the main Shazam screen and tap the Settings button (the cog icon in the upper left corner of the screen).
    Shazam
  3. In Settings, tap Connect next to Spotify, then when Spotify opens, scroll down and tap the green Agree button to authorize the link.
    Shazam
Once you've connected Shazam to your Spotify account, you can listen to your Shazams in full. In Shazam, tap the play button next to a song to listen to a 30-second preview. To listen to the whole song in Spotify, tap Spotify next to a Shazam or when viewing a Shazam in fullscreen.

Shazam
You can also get Shazam to create a "My Shazam Tracks" playlist in Spotify. Simply go into Shazam's Settings and toggle the switch next to Sync Shazams to Spotify to the green ON position. Once that's done, you'll be able to listen to all your previous Shazams in the "My Shazam Tracks" playlist in the Spotify app.
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Some AirPods Max Owners Seeing Excessive Battery Drain

Apple in December introduced the AirPods Max, its over-ear Apple-branded headphones that join the AirPods and AirPods Pro. Since launch, a growing number of MacRumors readers who purchased the AirPods Max have been complaining of battery drain that seems excessive.


Complaints range from high battery drain while the headphones are in use to significant battery loss when the headphones are meant to be idle. MacRumors reader VL_424 explains:

Been using my AirPod’s Max since Launch Day, over the last few days I’ve been running into some severe battery drain.

For example, last night I took the headphones out of the case with 85% battery, used them for about 15 minutes, put them back into the case.

This morning I get a notification via my iPhone that there was only 5% left. I wasn’t even attempting to connect to the ‌AirPods‌, I was airplaying to the HomePod in the room. It’s strange that the AirPod Max’s were even awake as they were still sitting in the case.. anyone else experiencing problems like this?

Many of the complaints have suggested that the ‌AirPods Max‌ are not properly going into a low power mode, and with no power button, there’s no way to force them to conserve battery. When the ‌AirPods Max‌ first launched, there was significant confusion over how low power modes worked when the ‌AirPods Max‌ are in and out of the Smart Case that’s included with the headphones.

Apple in a support document clarified that the ‌AirPods Max‌ are designed to enter into a “low power mode” after five minutes of being left stationary (not placed in a case). If untouched, the ‌AirPods Max‌ are meant to stay in low power mode for three days, after which the headphones go into an “ultralow” power state that cuts off Bluetooth and Find My.

When placed into the Smart Case, ‌AirPods Max‌ are designed to go into low power mode immediately rather than waiting for five minutes, and after 18 hours, go into the aforementioned ultralow power state.

Given Apple’s description, battery drain should be minimized when the ‌AirPods Max‌ are not in use both in and out of the case, but there may be an issue with low power mode given the battery problems that some users are experiencing.

Many MacRumors readers are seeing high levels of battery drain overnight, sometimes in double digit percentages, but most are seeing approximately 10 to 12 percent battery drain per day when the headphones are not in use. There have also been reports from some users who saw their headphones drain completely over the course of the day. From MacRumors reader DaSal:

The standby battery life really is poor. I’ve only had these for about two weeks and it’s already happened that I wanted to use them only to find out they completely emptied overnight. You can’t actually store them at 30% and assume you can use it next time you want to.

Some users believe that the issue may be related to the ‌AirPods Max‌ not disconnecting from devices when placed in the case or when entering low power mode. From MacRumors reader Broken Hope:

Seems to be an issue of them not disconnecting from all devices properly.

I got mine yesterday, used them with my phone, got annoyed that my Mac kept saying that the ‌AirPods‌ were nearby and disabled auto switching on my Mac, when I put them away for the night my Max’s were still showing in the battery widget on my Mac, thinking it was a glitch I went to work, I’ve come back and my Max’s have drained to 27% since yesterday evening.

With no power off option it seems that the ‌AirPods Max‌ are going to drain somewhat overnight even in low power mode, but given the number of reports about excessive battery drain, it seems that there could be a software bug that Apple will need to address in the future.

Like ‌AirPods‌ and ‌AirPods Pro‌, Apple is able to push over-the-air firmware updates for ‌AirPods Max‌, but to date, there have been no new firmware releases.

Related Roundup: AirPods Max
Buyer’s Guide: AirPods Max (Buy Now)

This article, “Some AirPods Max Owners Seeing Excessive Battery Drain” first appeared on MacRumors.com

Discuss this article in our forums

Apple in December introduced the AirPods Max, its over-ear Apple-branded headphones that join the AirPods and AirPods Pro. Since launch, a growing number of MacRumors readers who purchased the AirPods Max have been complaining of battery drain that seems excessive.


Complaints range from high battery drain while the headphones are in use to significant battery loss when the headphones are meant to be idle. MacRumors reader VL_424 explains:
Been using my AirPod's Max since Launch Day, over the last few days I've been running into some severe battery drain.

For example, last night I took the headphones out of the case with 85% battery, used them for about 15 minutes, put them back into the case.

This morning I get a notification via my iPhone that there was only 5% left. I wasn't even attempting to connect to the ‌AirPods‌, I was airplaying to the HomePod in the room. It's strange that the AirPod Max's were even awake as they were still sitting in the case.. anyone else experiencing problems like this?
Many of the complaints have suggested that the ‌AirPods Max‌ are not properly going into a low power mode, and with no power button, there's no way to force them to conserve battery. When the ‌AirPods Max‌ first launched, there was significant confusion over how low power modes worked when the ‌AirPods Max‌ are in and out of the Smart Case that's included with the headphones.

Apple in a support document clarified that the ‌AirPods Max‌ are designed to enter into a "low power mode" after five minutes of being left stationary (not placed in a case). If untouched, the ‌AirPods Max‌ are meant to stay in low power mode for three days, after which the headphones go into an "ultralow" power state that cuts off Bluetooth and Find My.

When placed into the Smart Case, ‌AirPods Max‌ are designed to go into low power mode immediately rather than waiting for five minutes, and after 18 hours, go into the aforementioned ultralow power state.

Given Apple's description, battery drain should be minimized when the ‌AirPods Max‌ are not in use both in and out of the case, but there may be an issue with low power mode given the battery problems that some users are experiencing.

Many MacRumors readers are seeing high levels of battery drain overnight, sometimes in double digit percentages, but most are seeing approximately 10 to 12 percent battery drain per day when the headphones are not in use. There have also been reports from some users who saw their headphones drain completely over the course of the day. From MacRumors reader DaSal:
The standby battery life really is poor. I've only had these for about two weeks and it's already happened that I wanted to use them only to find out they completely emptied overnight. You can't actually store them at 30% and assume you can use it next time you want to.
Some users believe that the issue may be related to the ‌AirPods Max‌ not disconnecting from devices when placed in the case or when entering low power mode. From MacRumors reader Broken Hope:
Seems to be an issue of them not disconnecting from all devices properly.

I got mine yesterday, used them with my phone, got annoyed that my Mac kept saying that the ‌AirPods‌ were nearby and disabled auto switching on my Mac, when I put them away for the night my Max's were still showing in the battery widget on my Mac, thinking it was a glitch I went to work, I've come back and my Max's have drained to 27% since yesterday evening.
With no power off option it seems that the ‌AirPods Max‌ are going to drain somewhat overnight even in low power mode, but given the number of reports about excessive battery drain, it seems that there could be a software bug that Apple will need to address in the future.

Like ‌AirPods‌ and ‌AirPods Pro‌, Apple is able to push over-the-air firmware updates for ‌AirPods Max‌, but to date, there have been no new firmware releases.
Related Roundup: AirPods Max
Buyer's Guide: AirPods Max (Buy Now)

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New Apple Podcasts Spotlight Feature Highlights Rising Podcast Creators

Apple today announced the launch of Apple Podcasts Spotlight, a new monthly editorial feature that’s designed to celebrate rising podcast creators.


The first Podcasts Spotlight creator is Chelsea Devantez, who hosts Celebrity Book Club. In the weekly podcast, Chelsea is joined by co-hosts like Gabourey Sidibe, Ashley Nicole Black, and Lydia Popovic to discuss the memoirs of celebrities like Mariah Carey, Jessica Simpson, and Jennifer Lopez, to provide listeners with new insights into celebrities they thought they knew.

“Apple Podcasts Spotlight helps listeners find some of the world’s best shows by shining a light on creators with singular voices,” said Ben Cave, Global Head of Business for Apple Podcasts. “Chelsea Devantez has created a fun, vibrant space with Celebrity Book Club for listeners to gain new perspectives on the celebrities we thought we knew. We are delighted to recognize Chelsea and Celebrity Book Club as our first Spotlight selection and look forward to introducing creators like Chelsea to listeners each month.”

Apple plans to announce new Spotlight creators on a monthly basis going forward, and the feature will represent a wide range of podcast genres, formats, and locations, with a focus on independent voices. Highlighted podcasts are featured in the “Browse” section of the Podcasts app and are shared by Apple on social media throughout the month.

Apple’s Podcasts Spotlight comes following news that Apple is working to develop its own podcast subscription service, which has the potential to lure creators away from competitors with the promise of more money and give Apple more original podcast content.

This article, “New Apple Podcasts Spotlight Feature Highlights Rising Podcast Creators” first appeared on MacRumors.com

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Apple today announced the launch of Apple Podcasts Spotlight, a new monthly editorial feature that's designed to celebrate rising podcast creators.


The first Podcasts Spotlight creator is Chelsea Devantez, who hosts Celebrity Book Club. In the weekly podcast, Chelsea is joined by co-hosts like Gabourey Sidibe, Ashley Nicole Black, and Lydia Popovic to discuss the memoirs of celebrities like Mariah Carey, Jessica Simpson, and Jennifer Lopez, to provide listeners with new insights into celebrities they thought they knew.
"Apple Podcasts Spotlight helps listeners find some of the world's best shows by shining a light on creators with singular voices," said Ben Cave, Global Head of Business for Apple Podcasts. "Chelsea Devantez has created a fun, vibrant space with Celebrity Book Club for listeners to gain new perspectives on the celebrities we thought we knew. We are delighted to recognize Chelsea and Celebrity Book Club as our first Spotlight selection and look forward to introducing creators like Chelsea to listeners each month."
Apple plans to announce new Spotlight creators on a monthly basis going forward, and the feature will represent a wide range of podcast genres, formats, and locations, with a focus on independent voices. Highlighted podcasts are featured in the "Browse" section of the Podcasts app and are shared by Apple on social media throughout the month.


Apple's Podcasts Spotlight comes following news that Apple is working to develop its own podcast subscription service, which has the potential to lure creators away from competitors with the promise of more money and give Apple more original podcast content.
This article, "New Apple Podcasts Spotlight Feature Highlights Rising Podcast Creators" first appeared on MacRumors.com

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AirPods Max Headband Removable With Just a SIM Ejector Tool, Hinting at Interchangeable Headbands

It is possible to remove the headband of AirPods Max with just a standard SIM card ejector tool, hinting at the possibility of interchanging headbands to achieve a different colorway.

Image via Prelook

In December, MacRumors revealed the large variety of AirPods Max ear cushion color combinations when it became clear that they were magnetically attatched and available for sale separately. Now, it appears that ‌AirPods Max‌ have a more modular design than previously understood, as raised by MacRumors forums member “MayaTlab”, who highlighted the tidbit from Chinese YouTube channel Prelook.

As mentioned in iFixit’s teardown of AirPods Max, it is possible to easily remove the headband from ‌AirPods Max‌ without any disassembly of the headphones. Users simply need to remove the magnetic ear cushions, fold the earcups flat, and insert a SIM card ejector tool into a small hole above the speaker.

Here’s the trick, and the best part: despite the joint’s complexity, you can detach the entire headband from ‌AirPods Max‌ with just a SIM card removal tool or paperclip, without even opening the ear cup.

When fully assembled, a little poke in just the right place compresses two tiny springs inside the joint, freeing the clamp that secures the headband.

Once removed, the spokes on either side of the headband reveal a small connector for transferring power, and potentially data, between the earcups. It is also interesting that the connector bears some passing resemblance to the Lightning connector. It seems likely that users could swap the headbands from different ‌AirPods Max‌ units to achieve non-stock colorways much more easily than expected.

Replaceable headbands were one of the features believed to be removed from AirPods Max prior to launch. Before being announced, it was speculated that ‌‌AirPods Max‌‌ would offer unique customizability with interchangeable headbands and earcups, repeating the concept behind Apple Watch bands.

Apple’s VP of industrial design Evans Hankey said that Apple prototyped hundreds of AirPods Max designs over a lengthy development period. Amid significant delays, Bloomberg correctly predicted that Apple would drop the concept of a replaceable headband to accelerate production:

Apple has also scaled back some of the interchangeable functionality of the headphones that were a hallmark of the initial concept. The latest version of the product is likely to lack a replaceable headband, but could still include interchangeable ear pads.

It is therefore possible that this system for removing the headband is a remnant of the original, more modular approach to ‌AirPods Max‌. On the other hand, this hidden feature may exist purely to aid repairability, and could not be intended for general user interaction at all.

Nevertheless, it is extremely unusual for headphones that transfer power over the headband to make the part so easily removable. The ease of removing the headband and the small connector on either side looks to be a peculiarly well-developed concept and stands in striking contrast to the otherwise challenging repairability of the device.

Users who wish to attempt removal of the headband from ‌AirPods Max‌ should still take extreme caution as it is not yet clear if this action voids the product’s warranty.

Related Roundup: AirPods Max
Tag: iFixit
Buyer’s Guide: AirPods Max (Buy Now)

This article, “AirPods Max Headband Removable With Just a SIM Ejector Tool, Hinting at Interchangeable Headbands” first appeared on MacRumors.com

Discuss this article in our forums

It is possible to remove the headband of AirPods Max with just a standard SIM card ejector tool, hinting at the possibility of interchanging headbands to achieve a different colorway.

Image via Prelook


In December, MacRumors revealed the large variety of AirPods Max ear cushion color combinations when it became clear that they were magnetically attatched and available for sale separately. Now, it appears that ‌AirPods Max‌ have a more modular design than previously understood, as raised by MacRumors forums member "MayaTlab", who highlighted the tidbit from Chinese YouTube channel Prelook.

As mentioned in iFixit's teardown of AirPods Max, it is possible to easily remove the headband from ‌AirPods Max‌ without any disassembly of the headphones. Users simply need to remove the magnetic ear cushions, fold the earcups flat, and insert a SIM card ejector tool into a small hole above the speaker.

Here's the trick, and the best part: despite the joint's complexity, you can detach the entire headband from ‌AirPods Max‌ with just a SIM card removal tool or paperclip, without even opening the ear cup.

When fully assembled, a little poke in just the right place compresses two tiny springs inside the joint, freeing the clamp that secures the headband.


Once removed, the spokes on either side of the headband reveal a small connector for transferring power, and potentially data, between the earcups. It is also interesting that the connector bears some passing resemblance to the Lightning connector. It seems likely that users could swap the headbands from different ‌AirPods Max‌ units to achieve non-stock colorways much more easily than expected.

Replaceable headbands were one of the features believed to be removed from AirPods Max prior to launch. Before being announced, it was speculated that ‌‌AirPods Max‌‌ would offer unique customizability with interchangeable headbands and earcups, repeating the concept behind Apple Watch bands.

Apple's VP of industrial design Evans Hankey said that Apple prototyped hundreds of AirPods Max designs over a lengthy development period. Amid significant delays, Bloomberg correctly predicted that Apple would drop the concept of a replaceable headband to accelerate production:

Apple has also scaled back some of the interchangeable functionality of the headphones that were a hallmark of the initial concept. The latest version of the product is likely to lack a replaceable headband, but could still include interchangeable ear pads.


It is therefore possible that this system for removing the headband is a remnant of the original, more modular approach to ‌AirPods Max‌. On the other hand, this hidden feature may exist purely to aid repairability, and could not be intended for general user interaction at all.

Nevertheless, it is extremely unusual for headphones that transfer power over the headband to make the part so easily removable. The ease of removing the headband and the small connector on either side looks to be a peculiarly well-developed concept and stands in striking contrast to the otherwise challenging repairability of the device.

Users who wish to attempt removal of the headband from ‌AirPods Max‌ should still take extreme caution as it is not yet clear if this action voids the product's warranty.
Related Roundup: AirPods Max
Tag: iFixit
Buyer's Guide: AirPods Max (Buy Now)

This article, "AirPods Max Headband Removable With Just a SIM Ejector Tool, Hinting at Interchangeable Headbands" first appeared on MacRumors.com

Discuss this article in our forums

Twelve South Announces ParcSlope Stand for MacBook and iPad

Accessory maker Twelve South has today announced the dual-purpose ParcSlope stand for MacBook and iPad, offering improved comfort and airflow.

Users can benefit from better ergonomics and cooling for MacBooks, while iPads can take advantage of the stand’s 18-degree angle for typing or sketching with Apple Pencil. The stand can hold every ‌iPad‌ model, except the iPad mini, in landscape or portrait mode.

Like many other popular Twelve South stands, ParcSlope is constructed from a single piece of metal, offers built-in cable management, and is available in matte black. The racetrack-shaped top rest contains soft ridges that allow the lid of a MacBook to hinge open freely, and the notched front lip enables users to open their MacBook with just one hand.

The new Twelve South ParcSlope is now available online for $59.99.

This article, “Twelve South Announces ParcSlope Stand for MacBook and iPad” first appeared on MacRumors.com

Discuss this article in our forums

Accessory maker Twelve South has today announced the dual-purpose ParcSlope stand for MacBook and iPad, offering improved comfort and airflow.



Users can benefit from better ergonomics and cooling for MacBooks, while iPads can take advantage of the stand's 18-degree angle for typing or sketching with Apple Pencil. The stand can hold every ‌iPad‌ model, except the iPad mini, in landscape or portrait mode.



Like many other popular Twelve South stands, ParcSlope is constructed from a single piece of metal, offers built-in cable management, and is available in matte black. The racetrack-shaped top rest contains soft ridges that allow the lid of a MacBook to hinge open freely, and the notched front lip enables users to open their MacBook with just one hand.

The new Twelve South ParcSlope is now available online for $59.99.
This article, "Twelve South Announces ParcSlope Stand for MacBook and iPad" first appeared on MacRumors.com

Discuss this article in our forums