Microsoft’s Xbox App Now Lets Xbox Users Stream Games to iPhone and iPad

Microsoft today released an updated version of its Xbox app designed for the iPhone and the iPad, which will allow Xbox users to play their games remotely on their Apple devices using streaming functionality.


Microsoft has been testing this feature for a few weeks, first providing it to Xbox app beta testers back in September. From the app’s release notes:

– Set up new consoles and queue games

– Play remotely from your console

– View and share game clips & screenshots

– Party chat with friends across devices

Have a look around the new app. More awesomeness is on the way!

The new Xbox streaming option is different than Microsoft’s xCloud service, which is not yet available on Apple’s devices due to Apple’s restrictions on cloud gaming. xCloud is meant to stream games from Microsoft’s servers directly, while the Xbox streaming option requires users to connect their devices to their Xbox consoles.

Microsoft’s updated Xbox app is similar to the PS4 Remote Play app that Sony offers on the ‌iPhone‌ and the ‌iPad‌. Like the Xbox app, Remote Play allows PlayStation users to play their PS4 games over WiFi on an Apple device.

The Xbox app streaming feature works outside of the home, letting Xbox owners access and play their games from the Xbox when not at home. According to the app’s release notes, the streaming feature requires an Xbox One or Xbox Series X/S that’s activated or in Instant-On mode along with a 5GHz WiFi connection or LTE/5G connection that provides 10Mb/s download speeds.

Any Xbox game installed on a compatible Xbox can be streamed with the exception of backward compatible titles from Xbox 360 or the original Xbox.

The Xbox app can be downloaded from the App Store for free. [Direct Link]

This article, “Microsoft’s Xbox App Now Lets Xbox Users Stream Games to iPhone and iPad” first appeared on MacRumors.com

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Microsoft today released an updated version of its Xbox app designed for the iPhone and the iPad, which will allow Xbox users to play their games remotely on their Apple devices using streaming functionality.


Microsoft has been testing this feature for a few weeks, first providing it to Xbox app beta testers back in September. From the app's release notes:
- Set up new consoles and queue games
- Play remotely from your console
- View and share game clips & screenshots
- Party chat with friends across devices

Have a look around the new app. More awesomeness is on the way!
The new Xbox streaming option is different than Microsoft's xCloud service, which is not yet available on Apple's devices due to Apple's restrictions on cloud gaming. xCloud is meant to stream games from Microsoft's servers directly, while the Xbox streaming option requires users to connect their devices to their Xbox consoles.

Microsoft's updated Xbox app is similar to the PS4 Remote Play app that Sony offers on the ‌iPhone‌ and the ‌iPad‌. Like the Xbox app, Remote Play allows PlayStation users to play their PS4 games over WiFi on an Apple device.

The Xbox app streaming feature works outside of the home, letting Xbox owners access and play their games from the Xbox when not at home. According to the app's release notes, the streaming feature requires an Xbox One or Xbox Series X/S that's activated or in Instant-On mode along with a 5GHz WiFi connection or LTE/5G connection that provides 10Mb/s download speeds.

Any Xbox game installed on a compatible Xbox can be streamed with the exception of backward compatible titles from Xbox 360 or the original Xbox.

The Xbox app can be downloaded from the App Store for free. [Direct Link]
This article, "Microsoft's Xbox App Now Lets Xbox Users Stream Games to iPhone and iPad" first appeared on MacRumors.com

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Hands-On With Apple’s MagSafe Charger for iPhone 12

Alongside the new iPhone 12 models, Apple introduced a MagSafe charger that attaches to the back of the iPhones using magnets embedded both in the charger and in the iPhone. It allows for speedier charging and paves the way for a portless ‌iPhone‌ in the future. MagSafe chargers are shipping out and are in some Apple retail locations now, and we picked one up to check it out.

Subscribe to the MacRumors YouTube channel for more videos.

MagSafe isn’t a new word for Apple — it’s what the magnetic MacBook chargers used to be called before Apple swapped over to USB-C. MagSafe in its current incarnation is totally different from the original MagSafe chargers, but the common theme is the magnetic connection.

The puck-shaped MagSafe charger looks like a larger Apple watch charging puck, featuring a circular design with a cord at one end that plugs into a power adapter. The charger is designed to snap on to a ring of magnets built into the ‌iPhone 12‌ and 12 Pro, for a perfect alignment without any hassle.


When you order a MagSafe charger from Apple for $39, you get just the charger, which has a cord with a USB-C connector at the end. It needs to be paired with a USB-C power adapter, and Apple recommends its $19 20W USB-C option. The cord attached to the MagSafe charger is non-removable, and the charger itself is made from aluminum, but the front middle section has a grippy, rubber-like feel to it.


Apple’s MagSafe chargers line up right with the charging coil inside the ‌iPhone 12‌ models, and can provide up to 15W of power. That’s double the charging speed you’re able to get with the 7.5W Qi wireless chargers, which makes this a much more appealing wireless charging option.


If you’re wondering if the MagSafe charger works with older iPhones, the answer is yes. It is compatible with all iPhones that support wireless charging, which includes the ‌iPhone‌ 8 and later. When used with an ‌iPhone 12‌, the charger snaps onto the back of the device with what appears to be a strong magnetic connection, but the older iPhones don’t have that same magnetic ring so it the MagSafe charger can’t connect in the same way.

We don’t have an ‌iPhone 12‌ model on hand yet to see the actual difference between the magnetic connection of one of the new models and an existing ‌iPhone‌, but just based on the marketing materials Apple has released, that magnetic ring in the ‌iPhone‌ is an important factor when it comes to the strength of the connection.


Even using a MagSafe-compatible ‌iPhone 12‌ case from OtterBox results in a connection that’s not super strong, and it appears that OtterBox, at least, has just stuck a couple of magnets in a little insert in the case to add MagSafe functionality. Presumably, the MagSafe ring built into the ‌iPhone 12‌ models makes the connection between MagSafe charger and ‌iPhone‌ much stronger, and Apple’s own cases may also be more magnetic.


While the ‌iPhone 12‌ models can charge at 15W using the MagSafe charger, it’s not yet quite clear how fast it can charge older iPhones, so there may be some speed limitations involved when using it with non-iPhone 12 models. As mentioned before, there’s no strong magnetic adhesion, so the non-iPhone 12 models just rest on the charger like your basic Qi charger.

The MagSafe charger is also able to charge Qi-based Android phones as well as the AirPods, but unsurprisingly, it is not compatible with the Apple Watch.

We’ll have an ‌iPhone 12‌ and 12 Pro on Friday to test out with the MagSafe charger, so make sure to tune in to MacRumors later in the week to see our ‌iPhone 12‌ hands-on with more detail on using the MagSafe charger with an ‌iPhone‌ that has the built-in magnetic ring.

Related Roundups: iPhone 12, iPhone 12 Pro
Tag: MagSafe

This article, “Hands-On With Apple’s MagSafe Charger for iPhone 12” first appeared on MacRumors.com

Discuss this article in our forums

Alongside the new iPhone 12 models, Apple introduced a MagSafe charger that attaches to the back of the iPhones using magnets embedded both in the charger and in the iPhone. It allows for speedier charging and paves the way for a portless ‌iPhone‌ in the future. MagSafe chargers are shipping out and are in some Apple retail locations now, and we picked one up to check it out.

Subscribe to the MacRumors YouTube channel for more videos.

MagSafe isn't a new word for Apple -- it's what the magnetic MacBook chargers used to be called before Apple swapped over to USB-C. MagSafe in its current incarnation is totally different from the original MagSafe chargers, but the common theme is the magnetic connection.

The puck-shaped MagSafe charger looks like a larger Apple watch charging puck, featuring a circular design with a cord at one end that plugs into a power adapter. The charger is designed to snap on to a ring of magnets built into the ‌iPhone 12‌ and 12 Pro, for a perfect alignment without any hassle.


When you order a MagSafe charger from Apple for $39, you get just the charger, which has a cord with a USB-C connector at the end. It needs to be paired with a USB-C power adapter, and Apple recommends its $19 20W USB-C option. The cord attached to the MagSafe charger is non-removable, and the charger itself is made from aluminum, but the front middle section has a grippy, rubber-like feel to it.


Apple's MagSafe chargers line up right with the charging coil inside the ‌iPhone 12‌ models, and can provide up to 15W of power. That's double the charging speed you're able to get with the 7.5W Qi wireless chargers, which makes this a much more appealing wireless charging option.


If you're wondering if the MagSafe charger works with older iPhones, the answer is yes. It is compatible with all iPhones that support wireless charging, which includes the ‌iPhone‌ 8 and later. When used with an ‌iPhone 12‌, the charger snaps onto the back of the device with what appears to be a strong magnetic connection, but the older iPhones don't have that same magnetic ring so it the MagSafe charger can't connect in the same way.

We don't have an ‌iPhone 12‌ model on hand yet to see the actual difference between the magnetic connection of one of the new models and an existing ‌iPhone‌, but just based on the marketing materials Apple has released, that magnetic ring in the ‌iPhone‌ is an important factor when it comes to the strength of the connection.


Even using a MagSafe-compatible ‌iPhone 12‌ case from OtterBox results in a connection that's not super strong, and it appears that OtterBox, at least, has just stuck a couple of magnets in a little insert in the case to add MagSafe functionality. Presumably, the MagSafe ring built into the ‌iPhone 12‌ models makes the connection between MagSafe charger and ‌iPhone‌ much stronger, and Apple's own cases may also be more magnetic.


While the ‌iPhone 12‌ models can charge at 15W using the MagSafe charger, it's not yet quite clear how fast it can charge older iPhones, so there may be some speed limitations involved when using it with non-iPhone 12 models. As mentioned before, there's no strong magnetic adhesion, so the non-iPhone 12 models just rest on the charger like your basic Qi charger.

The MagSafe charger is also able to charge Qi-based Android phones as well as the AirPods, but unsurprisingly, it is not compatible with the Apple Watch.

We'll have an ‌iPhone 12‌ and 12 Pro on Friday to test out with the MagSafe charger, so make sure to tune in to MacRumors later in the week to see our ‌iPhone 12‌ hands-on with more detail on using the MagSafe charger with an ‌iPhone‌ that has the built-in magnetic ring.
Related Roundups: iPhone 12, iPhone 12 Pro
Tag: MagSafe

This article, "Hands-On With Apple's MagSafe Charger for iPhone 12" first appeared on MacRumors.com

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Some Apple Watch SE Owners Experiencing Issues With Overheating

There may be an issue with the new Apple Watch SE, which some users have found is overheating after a few hours of usage. Several ‌Apple Watch SE‌ owners in South Korea have run into problems, as noted in a Reddit post chronicling the complaints.


There have been six reports from ‌Apple Watch SE‌ owners in South Korea who have had their Apple Watches get hot and malfunction, with a yellow spot appearing in the upper right corner of the watch.


All of the owners who have experienced issues were wearing the watch when it got hot on the wrist or when charging and then it later exhibited the display issue. As described on Reddit:

The owner received the product on October 8. The owner slept with the watch on the wrist on October 9 night. Woke up on October 10 just to find the wrist is very hot. The owner quickly took off the watch to find the red wrist due to heat. No power signals from the watch, but the sound plays well when the watch is searched with the Find my Watch feature. The owner exchanged the device with a new product on October 16.

There has been no teardown of the ‌Apple Watch SE‌ so it’s unclear what might be causing the problem, but as noted on Reddit, if it is similar in design to prior models, this could be the display connectors near the Taptic Engine.

It is not clear why this problem seems to be limited to South Korea, but we have not found other reports about the issue on the MacRumors forums, the Apple Support Communities, or social media networks. There may be a problem specific to watches manufactured in a certain area and shipped to South Korea, or it could be a more widespread issue and reports just haven’t come in yet.

Related Roundup: Apple Watch SE
Buyer’s Guide: Apple Watch SE (Buy Now)

This article, “Some Apple Watch SE Owners Experiencing Issues With Overheating” first appeared on MacRumors.com

Discuss this article in our forums

There may be an issue with the new Apple Watch SE, which some users have found is overheating after a few hours of usage. Several ‌Apple Watch SE‌ owners in South Korea have run into problems, as noted in a Reddit post chronicling the complaints.


There have been six reports from ‌Apple Watch SE‌ owners in South Korea who have had their Apple Watches get hot and malfunction, with a yellow spot appearing in the upper right corner of the watch.


All of the owners who have experienced issues were wearing the watch when it got hot on the wrist or when charging and then it later exhibited the display issue. As described on Reddit:
The owner received the product on October 8. The owner slept with the watch on the wrist on October 9 night. Woke up on October 10 just to find the wrist is very hot. The owner quickly took off the watch to find the red wrist due to heat. No power signals from the watch, but the sound plays well when the watch is searched with the Find my Watch feature. The owner exchanged the device with a new product on October 16.
There has been no teardown of the ‌Apple Watch SE‌ so it's unclear what might be causing the problem, but as noted on Reddit, if it is similar in design to prior models, this could be the display connectors near the Taptic Engine.

It is not clear why this problem seems to be limited to South Korea, but we have not found other reports about the issue on the MacRumors forums, the Apple Support Communities, or social media networks. There may be a problem specific to watches manufactured in a certain area and shipped to South Korea, or it could be a more widespread issue and reports just haven't come in yet.
Related Roundup: Apple Watch SE

This article, "Some Apple Watch SE Owners Experiencing Issues With Overheating" first appeared on MacRumors.com

Discuss this article in our forums

Apple Releases watchOS 7.0.3 for Apple Watch Series 3 to Fix Unexpected Restart Issue

Apple today released watchOS 7.0.3, the third update to the watchOS 7 operating system that was released in September. watchOS 7.0.3 comes a week after the release of watchOS 7.0.2, a bug fix update that addressed battery drain.


‌‌watchOS 7.0.3 can be downloaded for free through the dedicated Apple Watch app on the iPhone by going to General > Software Update. To install the new software, the Apple Watch needs to have at least 50 percent battery, it needs to be placed on a charger, and it needs to be in range of the ‌‌‌‌iPhone‌‌‌‌.

Today’s update is available only for the Apple Watch Series 3, and customers with other Apple Watch models will not see the update. watchOS 7.0.3 fixes the random reboots that Apple Watch Series 3 owners have been experiencing. From Apple’s release notes:

watchOS 7.0.3 contains improvements and bug fixes, including an issue where Apple Watch Series 3 may unexpectedly restart for some users.

For details on everything that’s new in ‌‌watchOS 7‌‌, make sure to check out our watchOS 7 roundup.

Related Roundup: Apple Watch Series 6
Buyer’s Guide: Apple Watch (Buy Now)

This article, “Apple Releases watchOS 7.0.3 for Apple Watch Series 3 to Fix Unexpected Restart Issue” first appeared on MacRumors.com

Discuss this article in our forums

Apple today released watchOS 7.0.3, the third update to the watchOS 7 operating system that was released in September. watchOS 7.0.3 comes a week after the release of watchOS 7.0.2, a bug fix update that addressed battery drain.


‌‌watchOS 7.0.3 can be downloaded for free through the dedicated Apple Watch app on the iPhone by going to General > Software Update. To install the new software, the Apple Watch needs to have at least 50 percent battery, it needs to be placed on a charger, and it needs to be in range of the ‌‌‌‌iPhone‌‌‌‌.

Today's update is available only for the Apple Watch Series 3, and customers with other Apple Watch models will not see the update. watchOS 7.0.3 fixes the random reboots that Apple Watch Series 3 owners have been experiencing. From Apple's release notes:
watchOS 7.0.3 contains improvements and bug fixes, including an issue where Apple Watch Series 3 may unexpectedly restart for some users.
For details on everything that's new in ‌‌watchOS 7‌‌, make sure to check out our watchOS 7 roundup.
Related Roundup: Apple Watch Series 6
Buyer's Guide: Apple Watch (Buy Now)

This article, "Apple Releases watchOS 7.0.3 for Apple Watch Series 3 to Fix Unexpected Restart Issue" first appeared on MacRumors.com

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Review: Beats Flex Offer a Great Entry Point to Apple’s Wireless Earphone Ecosystem for Just $50

One of the announcements last week that flew under the radar since it wasn’t explicitly mentioned during Apple’s event was the introduction of Beats Flex, new wireless earphones that represent an upgraded version of the previous BeatsX. Not only do Beats Flex come with some upgrades, but they also carry a much lower price of just $49.99, representing the most affordable way to get into Apple’s wireless earphone ecosystem.

The launch of Beats Flex comes at the perfect time, given that Apple has stopped including wired EarPods in the box with new purchases of iPhones, even older models that used to include them. EarPods are still available as a standalone purchase for a lower price of $19, but if you’re going to be buying headphones, it’s worth looking at wireless options like Beats Flex.

I’ve been using a pair of Beats Flex in a bright “Yuzu Yellow” color for almost a week, and I can say that they offer great value, particularly for those stepping up to wireless earphones for the first time, as those users are less likely to notice some of their shortcomings compared to more expensive Beats and AirPods options.


Right off the bat, I’ll say that if you’ve used BeatsX, then you have a great idea of what to expect with Beats Flex. Beats Flex are a pair of sealing in-ear earphones connected by a wire designed to be worn around the neck. Along the connecting wire are a couple of modules housing the electronics, controls, and battery for Beats Flex, and they sit comfortably at the sides of the neck.

With the cable wrapping around behind the neck, it’s super easy to pop one or both earphones out of your ear without worrying about losing them. And when you’re taking a break from listening, the two earphones click together magnetically to keep the whole thing secure around your neck.

Fit

Beats Flex come with four sizes of eartips, so most people shouldn’t have much trouble finding a good fit. The soft, pliable eartips are relatively easy to swap out, but you also don’t have to worry about them coming loose unintentionally.


Similar to AirPods Pro, Beats Flex eartips are designed to seal in the ear canal, which helps secure them in place during activity and block out ambient noise.

As an everyday ‌AirPods Pro‌ user, one thing about Beats Flex that took some getting used to was the cables dangling from my ears. They put a little bit of pressure on the ears, and with the seal in the ears, any sounds from the cord brushing against my shirt or the side of my face were transmitted directly into my ears. Between a combination of making sure to adjust how the cord sat on my neck and simply time spent using Beats Flex, the sounds became much less annoying.


The cable is made of Nitinol, a nickel-titanium alloy that offers a shape memory effect to keep the cable looped comfortably around your neck while also allowing the earphones to be coiled up and tossed in a bag or put in your pocket.

Overall, I found Beats Flex to be quite comfortable, as I was able to wear them for many hours at a time with no discomfort in my ears, the cable draped around my neck didn’t really bother me at all, and I quickly got used to having wires coming out of the earbuds. I still prefer my ‌AirPods Pro‌, of course, but I found little to complain about when comes to fit with Beats Flex.

Sound Quality

I found the sound quality of Beats Flex to be quite good for a lower-priced set of earphones, with the sealing eartips helping to shut out ambient sound and offer a full, resonant sound. Bass tones come through rather strongly, while mid and particularly highs feel weaker, but overall these earphones compare quite well to competing models.

Unlike ‌AirPods Pro‌, Beats Flex don’t have active noise cancellation, but I still found they did a pretty good job shutting out background noise and letting me focus on what I was listening to.

Microphone audio quality is solid, with my voice coming through clearly on phone calls and Siri recognizing my commands and requests just fine. Beats says it has improved microphone performance compared to BeatsX with optimized placement and an advanced voice algorithm that helps improve audio quality and mitigate wind noise.

Controls

With nearly identical neckband housings on each side, it takes a little bit of practice to remember which functions are located where, but once you learn that it’s easy to control things by feel.


The right-side housing includes just a single button along the edge that’s easy to identify by feel, and that’s the power/pairing button. Pressing and holding the button will turn Beats Flex on or off, and activate pairing as needed. If you’re using them with an iOS device, you’ll get quick pairing functionality by simply bringing Beats Flex close to your device after initially turning the earphones on. Android users can pair them either through the Bluetooth menu on their device or by downloading the Beats app for Android that gives you quick pairing access, firmware updates, product details, and information on battery level.

The left-side housing includes a pair of buttons, but they’re easy to distinguish between by feel. Along the edge is an elongated volume rocker, while a raised, round button on the face of the housing offers playback control. A quick press of the playback control will play or pause your audio or answer or hang up on a phone call. A double press skips forward to the next track, while a triple press skips backward, and pressing and holding activates ‌Siri‌.


The left-side housing also includes a black patch where the microphone lives, as well as the USB-C port. The left and right housings have small “L” and “R” labels to help you figure out which way to wear the earphones, but it doesn’t take long to learn which way is correct by glancing at the physical features of the housings or even just by feel.

This setup is a bit different from BeatsX, which actually had a third housing located closer to the ear on the left side that was where all of the physical controls were located. I think I prefer the simpler Beats Flex layout, which helps reduce weight (they’re 8% lighter than BeatsX) without compromising usability.

Connectivity

While Android users will get a fairly basic Bluetooth earphone experience with Beats Flex, the included W1 chip takes things to the next level for Apple users. It allows for quick pairing, seamless switching between devices linked to the same Apple ID, and Audio Sharing that lets you connect two pairs of compatible ‌AirPods‌ and Beats to a single device simultaneously to listen to the same content.


It’s important to note that the W1 chip in Beats Flex is the same one that was in the previous BeatsX, and it’s not the more advanced H1 chip found in the second-generation ‌AirPods‌, ‌AirPods Pro‌, Beats Solo Pro, Powerbeats Pro, and the latest Powerbeats. That means Beats Flex don’t support the new feature in iOS 14 that will automatically switch your earphones over to another device if you start playing audio on it.

Without the H1 chip, you also won’t get hands-free “Hey ‌Siri‌” support, so you’ll have to press the voice assistant button on the left-side neckband housing in order to access ‌Siri‌.

Range was solid in my testing, as is to be expected thanks to the W1 chip. It might not be quite as good as earphones with an H1 chip, but it does seem to outperform standard Bluetooth connections and I was able to receive solid audio reception from a device on the second floor of my house as I walked essentially the entire perimeter of my home, with only a couple of dropouts in spots of especially high physical interference.


Beats Flex don’t have the same ear detection that ‌AirPods‌ have, which automatically plays or pauses when you insert or remove the earphones, but Beats Flex come close by offering an alternative mechanism in which magnetically clicking the earphones together pauses music while separating them resumes playback. It results in a brief second where audio is playing while the earphones aren’t in your ear, but it’s a very workable solution.

Battery Life and Charging

Beats says that Beats Flex will last for around 12 hours on a single charge, up from 8 hours with BeatsX. I found the 12-hour rating to be pretty accurate based on my listening spread across multiple sessions, so you’ll likely be able to get several days’ use out of them before needing to recharge them, even with fairly heavy usage.

When it comes time to charge Beats Flex, you’ll need a USB-C cable, which is another change compared to BeatsX that used Lightning. A 6-inch USB-C to USB-C cable is included with Beats Flex, but you’ll need to supply your own power adapter or connect them directly to a computer.


I don’t mind the change to USB-C, as I’ve got plenty of USB-C cables just sitting around the house for charging my iPad Pro and Mac notebooks, but for some, the change might be a bit of an inconvenience. The switch to USB-C does make it much easier for Android users, as they generally have plenty of USB-C cables and may not already own any devices that charge over Lightning.

Just like with the Lightning port on BeatsX, the USB-C port on Beats Flex does not have any sort of cover on it. That leaves the port open to the sweat, rain, and dust, but it doesn’t appear that should be a significant concern and it avoids the awkward port covers seen on many other devices.

It took less than 90 minutes to fully charge Beats Flex once I depleted their battery, and a 10-minute Fast Fuel charge when the battery is low will give you up to 1.5 hours of playback time in a pinch. There’s a small LED on the power button that pulses red while charging and turns white once Beats Flex are fully charged.

Price

It’s really hard to beat the $49.99 price tag of Beats Flex, particularly if you’re in the Apple ecosystem, as you get a solid pair of wireless earphones that offer many of the bonuses made possible by Apple’s custom chips.

Thinking back to BeatsX, those earphones were introduced in early 2017 with a price tag of $150. That price was dropped over time to $120 and then $100, although those price cuts saw a few other changes like the elimination of an included carrying case and the fins intended to allow for even more in-ear fit options. Yes, BeatsX were frequently on sale for even less than the eventual $100 list price, but dropping all the way to an MSRP of $50 is a big move for Apple and Beats as the march toward the ubiquity of wireless headphones continues.

Final Thoughts

Beats Flex are great entry-level earphones that give you most of the Apple-specific features you see on more expensive Beats and ‌AirPods‌ models. With solid sound quality for the price and a comfortable fit, it’s hard to find much not to like about them.

The cable between the earphones makes them a bit more noticeable while wearing, compared to something like ‌AirPods‌. But that cable also helps keep you from losing your earbuds without resorting to something like over-ear hooks like on ‌Powerbeats Pro‌ that some find bulky and uncomfortable, or Powerbeats, which include both hooks and a cable.

The cable and magnetic earphone attachment mechanism also let you easily take them in and out throughout the day without needing to put them back into a case, and the 12-hour battery life is well beyond what ‌AirPods‌ or even ‌Powerbeats Pro‌ can deliver. Regular Powerbeats offer up to 15 hours of battery life but are less convenient to take in and out of your ears.

Apple and Beats aren’t known for offering cheap products, but at just $50, Beats Flex will likely be the perfect starter set of earphones for many of those looking for a bit more freedom than you get being tethered to their device with wired earphones. They’re definitely a way to dip your toes into Apple’s wireless earphones without having to step up to more expensive options from Apple and Beats that are all at least three times the price unless you find a great deal.

Beats Flex are available to order now in Beats Black and Yuzu Yellow for an October 21 launch, with Smoke Gray and Flame Blue color options coming in early 2021.

This article, “Review: Beats Flex Offer a Great Entry Point to Apple’s Wireless Earphone Ecosystem for Just $50” first appeared on MacRumors.com

Discuss this article in our forums

One of the announcements last week that flew under the radar since it wasn't explicitly mentioned during Apple's event was the introduction of Beats Flex, new wireless earphones that represent an upgraded version of the previous BeatsX. Not only do Beats Flex come with some upgrades, but they also carry a much lower price of just $49.99, representing the most affordable way to get into Apple's wireless earphone ecosystem.


The launch of Beats Flex comes at the perfect time, given that Apple has stopped including wired EarPods in the box with new purchases of iPhones, even older models that used to include them. EarPods are still available as a standalone purchase for a lower price of $19, but if you're going to be buying headphones, it's worth looking at wireless options like Beats Flex.

I've been using a pair of Beats Flex in a bright "Yuzu Yellow" color for almost a week, and I can say that they offer great value, particularly for those stepping up to wireless earphones for the first time, as those users are less likely to notice some of their shortcomings compared to more expensive Beats and AirPods options.


Right off the bat, I'll say that if you've used BeatsX, then you have a great idea of what to expect with Beats Flex. Beats Flex are a pair of sealing in-ear earphones connected by a wire designed to be worn around the neck. Along the connecting wire are a couple of modules housing the electronics, controls, and battery for Beats Flex, and they sit comfortably at the sides of the neck.

With the cable wrapping around behind the neck, it's super easy to pop one or both earphones out of your ear without worrying about losing them. And when you're taking a break from listening, the two earphones click together magnetically to keep the whole thing secure around your neck.

Fit


Beats Flex come with four sizes of eartips, so most people shouldn't have much trouble finding a good fit. The soft, pliable eartips are relatively easy to swap out, but you also don't have to worry about them coming loose unintentionally.


Similar to AirPods Pro, Beats Flex eartips are designed to seal in the ear canal, which helps secure them in place during activity and block out ambient noise.

As an everyday ‌AirPods Pro‌ user, one thing about Beats Flex that took some getting used to was the cables dangling from my ears. They put a little bit of pressure on the ears, and with the seal in the ears, any sounds from the cord brushing against my shirt or the side of my face were transmitted directly into my ears. Between a combination of making sure to adjust how the cord sat on my neck and simply time spent using Beats Flex, the sounds became much less annoying.


The cable is made of Nitinol, a nickel-titanium alloy that offers a shape memory effect to keep the cable looped comfortably around your neck while also allowing the earphones to be coiled up and tossed in a bag or put in your pocket.

Overall, I found Beats Flex to be quite comfortable, as I was able to wear them for many hours at a time with no discomfort in my ears, the cable draped around my neck didn't really bother me at all, and I quickly got used to having wires coming out of the earbuds. I still prefer my ‌AirPods Pro‌, of course, but I found little to complain about when comes to fit with Beats Flex.

Sound Quality


I found the sound quality of Beats Flex to be quite good for a lower-priced set of earphones, with the sealing eartips helping to shut out ambient sound and offer a full, resonant sound. Bass tones come through rather strongly, while mid and particularly highs feel weaker, but overall these earphones compare quite well to competing models.

Unlike ‌AirPods Pro‌, Beats Flex don't have active noise cancellation, but I still found they did a pretty good job shutting out background noise and letting me focus on what I was listening to.

Microphone audio quality is solid, with my voice coming through clearly on phone calls and Siri recognizing my commands and requests just fine. Beats says it has improved microphone performance compared to BeatsX with optimized placement and an advanced voice algorithm that helps improve audio quality and mitigate wind noise.

Controls


With nearly identical neckband housings on each side, it takes a little bit of practice to remember which functions are located where, but once you learn that it's easy to control things by feel.


The right-side housing includes just a single button along the edge that's easy to identify by feel, and that's the power/pairing button. Pressing and holding the button will turn Beats Flex on or off, and activate pairing as needed. If you're using them with an iOS device, you'll get quick pairing functionality by simply bringing Beats Flex close to your device after initially turning the earphones on. Android users can pair them either through the Bluetooth menu on their device or by downloading the Beats app for Android that gives you quick pairing access, firmware updates, product details, and information on battery level.

The left-side housing includes a pair of buttons, but they're easy to distinguish between by feel. Along the edge is an elongated volume rocker, while a raised, round button on the face of the housing offers playback control. A quick press of the playback control will play or pause your audio or answer or hang up on a phone call. A double press skips forward to the next track, while a triple press skips backward, and pressing and holding activates ‌Siri‌.


The left-side housing also includes a black patch where the microphone lives, as well as the USB-C port. The left and right housings have small "L" and "R" labels to help you figure out which way to wear the earphones, but it doesn't take long to learn which way is correct by glancing at the physical features of the housings or even just by feel.

This setup is a bit different from BeatsX, which actually had a third housing located closer to the ear on the left side that was where all of the physical controls were located. I think I prefer the simpler Beats Flex layout, which helps reduce weight (they're 8% lighter than BeatsX) without compromising usability.

Connectivity


While Android users will get a fairly basic Bluetooth earphone experience with Beats Flex, the included W1 chip takes things to the next level for Apple users. It allows for quick pairing, seamless switching between devices linked to the same Apple ID, and Audio Sharing that lets you connect two pairs of compatible ‌AirPods‌ and Beats to a single device simultaneously to listen to the same content.


It's important to note that the W1 chip in Beats Flex is the same one that was in the previous BeatsX, and it's not the more advanced H1 chip found in the second-generation ‌AirPods‌, ‌AirPods Pro‌, Beats Solo Pro, Powerbeats Pro, and the latest Powerbeats. That means Beats Flex don't support the new feature in iOS 14 that will automatically switch your earphones over to another device if you start playing audio on it.

Without the H1 chip, you also won't get hands-free "Hey ‌Siri‌" support, so you'll have to press the voice assistant button on the left-side neckband housing in order to access ‌Siri‌.

Range was solid in my testing, as is to be expected thanks to the W1 chip. It might not be quite as good as earphones with an H1 chip, but it does seem to outperform standard Bluetooth connections and I was able to receive solid audio reception from a device on the second floor of my house as I walked essentially the entire perimeter of my home, with only a couple of dropouts in spots of especially high physical interference.


Beats Flex don't have the same ear detection that ‌AirPods‌ have, which automatically plays or pauses when you insert or remove the earphones, but Beats Flex come close by offering an alternative mechanism in which magnetically clicking the earphones together pauses music while separating them resumes playback. It results in a brief second where audio is playing while the earphones aren't in your ear, but it's a very workable solution.

Battery Life and Charging


Beats says that Beats Flex will last for around 12 hours on a single charge, up from 8 hours with BeatsX. I found the 12-hour rating to be pretty accurate based on my listening spread across multiple sessions, so you'll likely be able to get several days' use out of them before needing to recharge them, even with fairly heavy usage.

When it comes time to charge Beats Flex, you'll need a USB-C cable, which is another change compared to BeatsX that used Lightning. A 6-inch USB-C to USB-C cable is included with Beats Flex, but you'll need to supply your own power adapter or connect them directly to a computer.


I don't mind the change to USB-C, as I've got plenty of USB-C cables just sitting around the house for charging my iPad Pro and Mac notebooks, but for some, the change might be a bit of an inconvenience. The switch to USB-C does make it much easier for Android users, as they generally have plenty of USB-C cables and may not already own any devices that charge over Lightning.

Just like with the Lightning port on BeatsX, the USB-C port on Beats Flex does not have any sort of cover on it. That leaves the port open to the sweat, rain, and dust, but it doesn't appear that should be a significant concern and it avoids the awkward port covers seen on many other devices.

It took less than 90 minutes to fully charge Beats Flex once I depleted their battery, and a 10-minute Fast Fuel charge when the battery is low will give you up to 1.5 hours of playback time in a pinch. There's a small LED on the power button that pulses red while charging and turns white once Beats Flex are fully charged.

Price


It's really hard to beat the $49.99 price tag of Beats Flex, particularly if you're in the Apple ecosystem, as you get a solid pair of wireless earphones that offer many of the bonuses made possible by Apple's custom chips.

Thinking back to BeatsX, those earphones were introduced in early 2017 with a price tag of $150. That price was dropped over time to $120 and then $100, although those price cuts saw a few other changes like the elimination of an included carrying case and the fins intended to allow for even more in-ear fit options. Yes, BeatsX were frequently on sale for even less than the eventual $100 list price, but dropping all the way to an MSRP of $50 is a big move for Apple and Beats as the march toward the ubiquity of wireless headphones continues.

Final Thoughts


Beats Flex are great entry-level earphones that give you most of the Apple-specific features you see on more expensive Beats and ‌AirPods‌ models. With solid sound quality for the price and a comfortable fit, it's hard to find much not to like about them.

The cable between the earphones makes them a bit more noticeable while wearing, compared to something like ‌AirPods‌. But that cable also helps keep you from losing your earbuds without resorting to something like over-ear hooks like on ‌Powerbeats Pro‌ that some find bulky and uncomfortable, or Powerbeats, which include both hooks and a cable.

The cable and magnetic earphone attachment mechanism also let you easily take them in and out throughout the day without needing to put them back into a case, and the 12-hour battery life is well beyond what ‌AirPods‌ or even ‌Powerbeats Pro‌ can deliver. Regular Powerbeats offer up to 15 hours of battery life but are less convenient to take in and out of your ears.

Apple and Beats aren't known for offering cheap products, but at just $50, Beats Flex will likely be the perfect starter set of earphones for many of those looking for a bit more freedom than you get being tethered to their device with wired earphones. They're definitely a way to dip your toes into Apple's wireless earphones without having to step up to more expensive options from Apple and Beats that are all at least three times the price unless you find a great deal.

Beats Flex are available to order now in Beats Black and Yuzu Yellow for an October 21 launch, with Smoke Gray and Flame Blue color options coming in early 2021.
This article, "Review: Beats Flex Offer a Great Entry Point to Apple's Wireless Earphone Ecosystem for Just $50" first appeared on MacRumors.com

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Apple Plans to Enable 5G in Dual SIM Mode With Software Update Later This Year

iPhone XS models and newer feature both a physical SIM slot and a digital eSIM, allowing for a feature known as dual SIM, dual standby. This means you can have two lines of service on one iPhone, which is useful for purchasing data-only plans while traveling abroad or having personal and business lines on a single iPhone.


5G will not be available in Dual SIM mode on the iPhone 12 and iPhone 12 Pro at launch, however, according to an internal training document for Apple employees shared on Reddit. MacRumors can confirm that the document is authentic.

From the document:

“Does 5G work with Dual SIM?”

When using two lines in Dual SIM mode, 5G data isn’t supported on either line and will fall back to 4G LTE. If customers are using eSIM only and are on a 5G supported carrier and service plan, they’ll have 5G access.

According to an internal Verizon slide obtained by MacRumors, however, Apple plans to enable 5G support in Dual SIM mode with a software update later this year. In the meantime, Verizon says that eSIM customers must remove the physical SIM from their iPhone 12 or iPhone 12 Pro to access its 5G network.

5G is automatically enabled on iPhone 12 and iPhone 12 Pro models, as long as users have chosen a supported wireless carrier that offers a 5G network. To access 5G while roaming in other countries, Apple’s document says that customers can purchase a local SIM card or eSIM plan and use it as a single line with 5G where available.

iPhone 12 and iPhone 12 Pro pre-orders began last Friday, and shipments will begin arriving to customers this coming Friday. iPhone 12 mini and iPhone 12 Pro Max will be available to pre-order starting Friday, November 6.

Related Roundups: iPhone 12, iPhone 12 Pro
Tags: 5G, eSIM

This article, “Apple Plans to Enable 5G in Dual SIM Mode With Software Update Later This Year” first appeared on MacRumors.com

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iPhone XS models and newer feature both a physical SIM slot and a digital eSIM, allowing for a feature known as dual SIM, dual standby. This means you can have two lines of service on one iPhone, which is useful for purchasing data-only plans while traveling abroad or having personal and business lines on a single iPhone.


5G will not be available in Dual SIM mode on the iPhone 12 and iPhone 12 Pro at launch, however, according to an internal training document for Apple employees shared on Reddit. MacRumors can confirm that the document is authentic.

From the document:
"Does 5G work with Dual SIM?"
When using two lines in Dual SIM mode, 5G data isn't supported on either line and will fall back to 4G LTE. If customers are using eSIM only and are on a 5G supported carrier and service plan, they'll have 5G access.
According to an internal Verizon slide obtained by MacRumors, however, Apple plans to enable 5G support in Dual SIM mode with a software update later this year. In the meantime, Verizon says that eSIM customers must remove the physical SIM from their iPhone 12 or iPhone 12 Pro to access its 5G network.

5G is automatically enabled on iPhone 12 and iPhone 12 Pro models, as long as users have chosen a supported wireless carrier that offers a 5G network. To access 5G while roaming in other countries, Apple's document says that customers can purchase a local SIM card or eSIM plan and use it as a single line with 5G where available.

iPhone 12 and iPhone 12 Pro pre-orders began last Friday, and shipments will begin arriving to customers this coming Friday. iPhone 12 mini and iPhone 12 Pro Max will be available to pre-order starting Friday, November 6.
Related Roundups: iPhone 12, iPhone 12 Pro
Tags: 5G, eSIM

This article, "Apple Plans to Enable 5G in Dual SIM Mode With Software Update Later This Year" first appeared on MacRumors.com

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iPhone 12 Pro in Graphite and MagSafe Accessories Shown Off in More Unboxing Videos and Photos

While the iPhone 12 Pro does not launch until Friday, we now have an early unboxing video of the device courtesy of Twitter account DuanRui, providing a closer look at the shiny new flat-edge design and sleek Graphite color option.

Ben Geskin re-uploaded the unboxing video to YouTube, which we’ve embedded below:

More unboxing videos have also surfaced for Apple’s new MagSafe Charger and cases, which magnetically attach to the back of iPhone 12 models.

In addition to the iPhone 12 lineup, Apple notes that its MagSafe Charger is compatible with the iPhone 8 through iPhone 11 Pro Max, but the charger does not magnetically attach to those devices. The MagSafe Charger is also limited to 7.5W on older iPhones, compared to 15W on iPhone 12 models.

Aaron Zollo of ZolloTech demonstrated this backwards compatibility by charging an iPhone 8 and iPhone 11 Pro Max with the MagSafe Charger. The charger is also compatible with AirPods and AirPods Pro cases, but not the Apple Watch.

As for other MagSafe accessories, YouTube channel MrHtech has shared an unboxing video of Apple’s new Silicone Case for the iPhone 12 and iPhone 12 Pro in five colors: Navy, Plum, Pink Citrus, Cyprus Green, and Kumquat. Notably, the Silicone Case now covers the bottom of the iPhone, with cutouts for the Lightning connector, speaker, and microphone.

Photos of the (PRODUCT)RED version of the Silicone Case with MagSafe and other accessories can be found in the MacRumors forums.

YouTube channel iCrackUriDevice has shared an unboxing of the Clear Case with MagSafe for the iPhone 12 and iPhone 12 Pro. Unlike the new Silicone Case, the Clear Case continues to expose the bottom edge of the iPhone.

MagSafe cases will begin arriving to most customers on Friday, while the Leather Wallet with MagSafe appears to be slated for delivery in November. Apple’s MagSafe Duo Charger and Leather Sleeve with MagSafe will be available at a later date.

Related Roundups: iPhone 12, iPhone 12 Pro
Tag: MagSafe

This article, “iPhone 12 Pro in Graphite and MagSafe Accessories Shown Off in More Unboxing Videos and Photos” first appeared on MacRumors.com

Discuss this article in our forums

While the iPhone 12 Pro does not launch until Friday, we now have an early unboxing video of the device courtesy of Twitter account DuanRui, providing a closer look at the shiny new flat-edge design and sleek Graphite color option.

Ben Geskin re-uploaded the unboxing video to YouTube, which we've embedded below:


More unboxing videos have also surfaced for Apple's new MagSafe Charger and cases, which magnetically attach to the back of iPhone 12 models.

In addition to the iPhone 12 lineup, Apple notes that its MagSafe Charger is compatible with the iPhone 8 through iPhone 11 Pro Max, but the charger does not magnetically attach to those devices. The MagSafe Charger is also limited to 7.5W on older iPhones, compared to 15W on iPhone 12 models.

Aaron Zollo of ZolloTech demonstrated this backwards compatibility by charging an iPhone 8 and iPhone 11 Pro Max with the MagSafe Charger. The charger is also compatible with AirPods and AirPods Pro cases, but not the Apple Watch.


As for other MagSafe accessories, YouTube channel MrHtech has shared an unboxing video of Apple's new Silicone Case for the iPhone 12 and iPhone 12 Pro in five colors: Navy, Plum, Pink Citrus, Cyprus Green, and Kumquat. Notably, the Silicone Case now covers the bottom of the iPhone, with cutouts for the Lightning connector, speaker, and microphone.


Photos of the (PRODUCT)RED version of the Silicone Case with MagSafe and other accessories can be found in the MacRumors forums.

YouTube channel iCrackUriDevice has shared an unboxing of the Clear Case with MagSafe for the iPhone 12 and iPhone 12 Pro. Unlike the new Silicone Case, the Clear Case continues to expose the bottom edge of the iPhone.


MagSafe cases will begin arriving to most customers on Friday, while the Leather Wallet with MagSafe appears to be slated for delivery in November. Apple's MagSafe Duo Charger and Leather Sleeve with MagSafe will be available at a later date.
Related Roundups: iPhone 12, iPhone 12 Pro
Tag: MagSafe

This article, "iPhone 12 Pro in Graphite and MagSafe Accessories Shown Off in More Unboxing Videos and Photos" first appeared on MacRumors.com

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Japan Preparing to Regulate Big Tech in Collaboration with U.S. and Europe

Japan has followed the United States, Australia, and numerous countries around the world in preparing to heavily regulate big tech companies, including Apple, due to antitrust disputes and fears about market control (via Reuters).

Japan is reportedly “laying the groundwork” to regulate big tech companies including Apple, Google, Amazon, and Facebook. Kazuyuki Furuya, chairman of Japan’s Fair Trade Commission (FTC), said that Tokyo will join global efforts to regulate digital platform operators.

“If the size of any merger or business-tie up is big, we can launch an anti-monopoly investigation into the buyer’s process of acquiring a start-up,” Furuya told Reuters. “We’re closely watching developments including in Europe.”

Furuya expressed the need for global coordination when regulating large technology companies, particularly since they tend to have similar business practices across the globe.

We’ll work closely with our U.S. and European counterparts, and respond if to any moves that hamper competition.

If digital platform providers are found to be abusing their dominant market positions against the interests of consumers, the FTC says that it is ready to act decisively with probes that will “push through aggressively.” The FTC will also investigate the Japanese smartphone market and determine if there can be improvements made to encourage competition.

Major antitrust inquiries have now been undertaken in the United States, the European Union, Italy, Australia, Russia, and South Korea.

In particular, the European Union is preparing forceful regulations for big tech, including compiling a “hit-list” of companies and a wide-reaching Digital Services Act that could ban tech companies from pre-installing apps and force them to share data with their competitors.

Note: Due to the political or social nature of the discussion regarding this topic, the discussion thread is located in our Political News forum. All forum members and site visitors are welcome to read and follow the thread, but posting is limited to forum members with at least 100 posts.

This article, “Japan Preparing to Regulate Big Tech in Collaboration with U.S. and Europe” first appeared on MacRumors.com

Discuss this article in our forums

Japan has followed the United States, Australia, and numerous countries around the world in preparing to heavily regulate big tech companies, including Apple, due to antitrust disputes and fears about market control (via Reuters).



Japan is reportedly "laying the groundwork" to regulate big tech companies including Apple, Google, Amazon, and Facebook. Kazuyuki Furuya, chairman of Japan's Fair Trade Commission (FTC), said that Tokyo will join global efforts to regulate digital platform operators.

"If the size of any merger or business-tie up is big, we can launch an anti-monopoly investigation into the buyer's process of acquiring a start-up," Furuya told Reuters. "We're closely watching developments including in Europe."


Furuya expressed the need for global coordination when regulating large technology companies, particularly since they tend to have similar business practices across the globe.

We'll work closely with our U.S. and European counterparts, and respond if to any moves that hamper competition.


If digital platform providers are found to be abusing their dominant market positions against the interests of consumers, the FTC says that it is ready to act decisively with probes that will "push through aggressively." The FTC will also investigate the Japanese smartphone market and determine if there can be improvements made to encourage competition.

Major antitrust inquiries have now been undertaken in the United States, the European Union, Italy, Australia, Russia, and South Korea.

In particular, the European Union is preparing forceful regulations for big tech, including compiling a "hit-list" of companies and a wide-reaching Digital Services Act that could ban tech companies from pre-installing apps and force them to share data with their competitors.

Note: Due to the political or social nature of the discussion regarding this topic, the discussion thread is located in our Political News forum. All forum members and site visitors are welcome to read and follow the thread, but posting is limited to forum members with at least 100 posts.
This article, "Japan Preparing to Regulate Big Tech in Collaboration with U.S. and Europe" first appeared on MacRumors.com

Discuss this article in our forums

Apple TV+ Gaining New ‘Peanuts’ Specials Alongside Classic Holiday Episodes

Following an announcement earlier in the month that “The Snoopy Show” will launch on Apple TV+ in 2021, today WildBrain revealed that a collection of new one-off specials will also be coming to Apple TV+.

These specials will include the popular characters celebrating Mother’s Day, Earth Day, New Year’s Eve, and going back to school. Besides the new series and specials, fans can also expect a 70th anniversary documentary film coming next year on ‌Apple TV‌+.


In addition to the new content, ‌Apple TV‌+ is getting iconic Peanuts specials, including “A Charlie Brown Christmas,” “Charlie Brown Thanksgiving,” and “It’s the Great Pumpkin, Charlie Brown.” The Halloween special will premiere on ‌Apple TV‌+ today for subscribers, and then it’ll be free for everyone in the TV app from October 30 through November 1.

“A Charlie Brown Thanksgiving” is coming on November 18 for ‌Apple TV‌+ subscribers, and then it’ll be free from November 25 through November 27 in the TV app. Lastly, “A Charlie Brown Christmas” premieres for subscribers on December 4, and then it’ll be free from December 11 through December 13.

Apple first inked a deal with WildBrain (formerly DHX Media) back in 2018, agreeing to be the exclusive home of new Peanuts content. The first of these shows was “Peanuts in Space: Secrets of Apollo 10,” for which Apple won an Emmy.

This article, “Apple TV+ Gaining New ‘Peanuts’ Specials Alongside Classic Holiday Episodes” first appeared on MacRumors.com

Discuss this article in our forums

Following an announcement earlier in the month that "The Snoopy Show" will launch on Apple TV+ in 2021, today WildBrain revealed that a collection of new one-off specials will also be coming to Apple TV+.

These specials will include the popular characters celebrating Mother's Day, Earth Day, New Year's Eve, and going back to school. Besides the new series and specials, fans can also expect a 70th anniversary documentary film coming next year on ‌Apple TV‌+.


In addition to the new content, ‌Apple TV‌+ is getting iconic Peanuts specials, including "A Charlie Brown Christmas," "Charlie Brown Thanksgiving," and "It's the Great Pumpkin, Charlie Brown." The Halloween special will premiere on ‌Apple TV‌+ today for subscribers, and then it'll be free for everyone in the TV app from October 30 through November 1.

"A Charlie Brown Thanksgiving" is coming on November 18 for ‌Apple TV‌+ subscribers, and then it'll be free from November 25 through November 27 in the TV app. Lastly, "A Charlie Brown Christmas" premieres for subscribers on December 4, and then it'll be free from December 11 through December 13.

Apple first inked a deal with WildBrain (formerly DHX Media) back in 2018, agreeing to be the exclusive home of new Peanuts content. The first of these shows was "Peanuts in Space: Secrets of Apollo 10," for which Apple won an Emmy.
This article, "Apple TV+ Gaining New 'Peanuts' Specials Alongside Classic Holiday Episodes" first appeared on MacRumors.com

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Deals: Amazon Discounting Both Models of 2020 MacBook Air, Starting at $849.99 for 256GB

Amazon has introduced a few discounts on Apple’s 2020 MacBook Air in both 256GB and 512GB storage options. To start, you can get the 256GB MacBook Air for $849.99, down from $999.00. You’ll see this price after a $100 coupon is applied automatically at the checkout screen.

Note: MacRumors is an affiliate partner with Amazon. When you click a link and make a purchase, we may receive a small payment, which helps us keep the site running.

Likewise, the 512GB MacBook Air has an automatic coupon on Amazon this week. It’s priced at $1,149.99, down from $1,299.00, following a $99.01 coupon at checkout (or $49.01, depending on the color you choose). Both models are available in all three colors, and these sales represent the best discounts that we’ve ever tracked for the new 2020 MacBook Air.

These models were updated in March of this year with a new Magic Keyboard with scissor switches, faster processors, more storage space, and a reduced starting price tag of $999.00 for the 256GB model. Both models feature a 13-inch Retina display, slim black bezels, and a Force Touch trackpad. Apple offers the MacBook Air in Space Gray, Silver, and Gold.

You can find even more discounts on other MacBooks by visiting our Best Deals guide for MacBook Pro and MacBook Air. In this guide we track the steepest discounts for the newest MacBook models every week, so be sure to bookmark it and check back often if you’re shopping for a new Apple notebook.

Related Roundup: Apple Deals

This article, “Deals: Amazon Discounting Both Models of 2020 MacBook Air, Starting at $849.99 for 256GB” first appeared on MacRumors.com

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Amazon has introduced a few discounts on Apple's 2020 MacBook Air in both 256GB and 512GB storage options. To start, you can get the 256GB MacBook Air for $849.99, down from $999.00. You'll see this price after a $100 coupon is applied automatically at the checkout screen.

Note: MacRumors is an affiliate partner with Amazon. When you click a link and make a purchase, we may receive a small payment, which helps us keep the site running.

Likewise, the 512GB MacBook Air has an automatic coupon on Amazon this week. It's priced at $1,149.99, down from $1,299.00, following a $99.01 coupon at checkout (or $49.01, depending on the color you choose). Both models are available in all three colors, and these sales represent the best discounts that we've ever tracked for the new 2020 MacBook Air.

$150 OFF
256GB Model For $849.99


These models were updated in March of this year with a new Magic Keyboard with scissor switches, faster processors, more storage space, and a reduced starting price tag of $999.00 for the 256GB model. Both models feature a 13-inch Retina display, slim black bezels, and a Force Touch trackpad. Apple offers the MacBook Air in Space Gray, Silver, and Gold.

$150 OFF
512GB Model For $1,149.99


You can find even more discounts on other MacBooks by visiting our Best Deals guide for MacBook Pro and MacBook Air. In this guide we track the steepest discounts for the newest MacBook models every week, so be sure to bookmark it and check back often if you're shopping for a new Apple notebook.
Related Roundup: Apple Deals

This article, "Deals: Amazon Discounting Both Models of 2020 MacBook Air, Starting at $849.99 for 256GB" first appeared on MacRumors.com

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