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Bloomberg: Apple Loses Two Veteran Operations Executives

Apple has lost two long-serving operations executives, including its VP in charge of manufacturing design and a longtime iPhone operations executive who moved to its AR division, reports Bloomberg‘s Mark Gurman.


Nick Forlenza, a vice president of manufacturing design, has retired from Apple, while Duco Pasmooij, another vice president who worked on operations, is discussing an exit in the near future, according to people familiar with the moves. Pasmooij left the operations team over a year ago, moving into a role reporting to the company’s head of augmented reality efforts, said the people, who asked not to be identified discussing personnel.

According to the report, Forlenza had worked under Sabih Kahn, Apple’s senior VP of operations, as an executive in charge of manufacturing design. Forlenza led a team of supply chain and operations executives responsible for global production processes and manufacturing equipment.

Pasmooij helped lead production operations for the ‌iPhone‌ for many years, but had recently reported to Mike Rockwell, the vice president in charge of augmented reality and virtual reality efforts. The personnel moves aren’t related to each other, nor to the recent supply chain disruptions owing to the coronavirus outbreak, according Gurman’s sources.

Apple has about 100 vice presidents who help CEO Tim Cook and the senior executive team run the company.

This article, “Bloomberg: Apple Loses Two Veteran Operations Executives” first appeared on MacRumors.com

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Apple has lost two long-serving operations executives, including its VP in charge of manufacturing design and a longtime iPhone operations executive who moved to its AR division, reports Bloomberg's Mark Gurman.


Nick Forlenza, a vice president of manufacturing design, has retired from Apple, while Duco Pasmooij, another vice president who worked on operations, is discussing an exit in the near future, according to people familiar with the moves. Pasmooij left the operations team over a year ago, moving into a role reporting to the company’s head of augmented reality efforts, said the people, who asked not to be identified discussing personnel.
According to the report, Forlenza had worked under Sabih Kahn, Apple's senior VP of operations, as an executive in charge of manufacturing design. Forlenza led a team of supply chain and operations executives responsible for global production processes and manufacturing equipment.

Pasmooij helped lead production operations for the ‌iPhone‌ for many years, but had recently reported to Mike Rockwell, the vice president in charge of augmented reality and virtual reality efforts. The personnel moves aren't related to each other, nor to the recent supply chain disruptions owing to the coronavirus outbreak, according Gurman's sources.

Apple has about 100 vice presidents who help CEO Tim Cook and the senior executive team run the company.


This article, "Bloomberg: Apple Loses Two Veteran Operations Executives" first appeared on MacRumors.com

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Google Earth Now Works in Firefox, Edge, and Opera Browsers, Safari Support Coming Later

Google has announced that Google Earth can now be accessed in browsers other than Chrome. From today, the new version of the interactive mapping app on the web fully supports Firefox, Edge, and Opera browsers.


Earth launched on the web in 2017, but there wasn’t an open web standard available at the time that could support its advanced features, so it exclusively relied on Google’s Chrome-only Native Client (NaCl) technology.

The new support for other browsers was made possible by moving Google Earth for Chrome onto WebAssembly (Wasm), which Google has helped develop for the last three years. It’s now the leading W3C open web standard for bringing native code to the web.

Google still aims to bring Earth to Apple’s Safari browser, but admitted in its blog post that “we still have some work to do” before it can make that happen.

Google said last year that Earth would support Safari once Apple adds “better support for WebGL2” in the browser. That’s still in development, according to WebKit’s online Feature Status report.

In the meantime, iPhone and iPad users can check out the dedicated Google Earth iOS app, which lets you explore world from above with satellite imagery, 3D terrain of the entire globe, and 3D buildings in hundreds of cities around the world.

This article, “Google Earth Now Works in Firefox, Edge, and Opera Browsers, Safari Support Coming Later” first appeared on MacRumors.com

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Google has announced that Google Earth can now be accessed in browsers other than Chrome. From today, the new version of the interactive mapping app on the web fully supports Firefox, Edge, and Opera browsers.


Earth launched on the web in 2017, but there wasn't an open web standard available at the time that could support its advanced features, so it exclusively relied on Google's Chrome-only Native Client (NaCl) technology.

The new support for other browsers was made possible by moving Google Earth for Chrome onto WebAssembly (Wasm), which Google has helped develop for the last three years. It's now the leading W3C open web standard for bringing native code to the web.

Google still aims to bring Earth to Apple's Safari browser, but admitted in its blog post that "we still have some work to do" before it can make that happen.

Google said last year that Earth would support Safari once Apple adds "better support for WebGL2" in the browser. That's still in development, according to WebKit's online Feature Status report.

In the meantime, iPhone and iPad users can check out the dedicated Google Earth iOS app, which lets you explore world from above with satellite imagery, 3D terrain of the entire globe, and 3D buildings in hundreds of cities around the world.


This article, "Google Earth Now Works in Firefox, Edge, and Opera Browsers, Safari Support Coming Later" first appeared on MacRumors.com

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Apple Pulls Shadow Cloud Gaming Service From App Store for Violating Guidelines

Cloud gaming service Shadow has had its apps removed from the App Store after it was found to be in violation of Apple’s guidelines.


For those unfamiliar with the service, Shadow allows subscribers to play triple-A titles on their smartphones, tablets, set-top boxes and computers, while high-end remote servers take the burden of processing the graphically intensive games.

The French company that runs the service confirmed via a Reddit post that Apple has removed its streaming apps for iOS and Apple TV from the ‌App Store‌ for a “failure to act in accordance with a specific part of the Apple ‌App Store‌ Guidelines.” The Shadow app for Macs was unaffected by the other apps’ removal and remains available on the Shadow website.

In the announcement, the company said it was “currently investigating the situation” and would be working on a plan to bring Shadow back to Apple device users as soon as possible.

It’s unclear what aspect of Apple’s ‌App Store‌ policy the service has contravened, but the situation sounds similar to when Apple rejected Valve’s Steam Link app in May 2018 due to ‌App Store‌ review guideline violations related to in-app purchases.

Valve’s app eventually returned to the ‌App Store‌ a later, but only after it removed the option to purchase games from within the app.

Tag: Shadow

This article, “Apple Pulls Shadow Cloud Gaming Service From App Store for Violating Guidelines” first appeared on MacRumors.com

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Cloud gaming service Shadow has had its apps removed from the App Store after it was found to be in violation of Apple's guidelines.


For those unfamiliar with the service, Shadow allows subscribers to play triple-A titles on their smartphones, tablets, set-top boxes and computers, while high-end remote servers take the burden of processing the graphically intensive games.

The French company that runs the service confirmed via a Reddit post that Apple has removed its streaming apps for iOS and Apple TV from the ‌App Store‌ for a "failure to act in accordance with a specific part of the Apple ‌App Store‌ Guidelines." The Shadow app for Macs was unaffected by the other apps' removal and remains available on the Shadow website.

In the announcement, the company said it was "currently investigating the situation" and would be working on a plan to bring Shadow back to Apple device users as soon as possible.

It's unclear what aspect of Apple's ‌App Store‌ policy the service has contravened, but the situation sounds similar to when Apple rejected Valve's Steam Link app in May 2018 due to ‌App Store‌ review guideline violations related to in-app purchases.

Valve's app eventually returned to the ‌App Store‌ a later, but only after it removed the option to purchase games from within the app.

Tag: Shadow

This article, "Apple Pulls Shadow Cloud Gaming Service From App Store for Violating Guidelines" first appeared on MacRumors.com

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USTR announces Chinese measures toward implementation of trade deal

While the U.S. and China earlier this year announced a so-called “phase one” trade deal, questions remained about commitments and the enforcement of the deal’s provisions. All the metals intelligence you need in one user-friendly platform with unlimited usage – Request a MetalMiner Insights platform demo As such, despite forestalling the implementation of new planned…

The post USTR announces Chinese measures toward implementation of trade deal appeared first on Steel, Aluminum, Copper, Stainless, Rare Earth, Metal Prices, Forecasting | MetalMiner.

While the U.S. and China earlier this year announced a so-called “phase one” trade deal, questions remained about commitments and the enforcement of the deal’s provisions. All the metals intelligence you need in one user-friendly platform with unlimited usage – Request a MetalMiner Insights platform demo As such, despite forestalling the implementation of new planned...

The post USTR announces Chinese measures toward implementation of trade deal appeared first on Steel, Aluminum, Copper, Stainless, Rare Earth, Metal Prices, Forecasting | MetalMiner.

China’s aluminum supply chain trauma on the heels of the coronavirus outbreak

A recent article by respected Reuters columnist Andy Home reports on the impact of the coronavirus, COVID-19, on the supply-demand balance in China, the world’s largest consumer and producer of aluminum, and the ramifications steps taken to contain the virus could have for the market. Request a 30-minute demo of the MetalMiner Insights platform now….

The post China’s aluminum supply chain trauma on the heels of the coronavirus outbreak appeared first on Steel, Aluminum, Copper, Stainless, Rare Earth, Metal Prices, Forecasting | MetalMiner.

A recent article by respected Reuters columnist Andy Home reports on the impact of the coronavirus, COVID-19, on the supply-demand balance in China, the world’s largest consumer and producer of aluminum, and the ramifications steps taken to contain the virus could have for the market. Request a 30-minute demo of the MetalMiner Insights platform now....

The post China’s aluminum supply chain trauma on the heels of the coronavirus outbreak appeared first on Steel, Aluminum, Copper, Stainless, Rare Earth, Metal Prices, Forecasting | MetalMiner.

Hands-On With NVIDIA’s GeForce Now Streaming Game Service

Back in 2017, NVIDIA announced the launch of its GeForce Now streaming gaming service, which it made available in a beta capacity.

After years of testing, polishing, and refining, the GeForce Now service saw its official launch on February 4, so we thought we’d go hands-on with GeForce Now to see how it works on Apple’s Macs.

Subscribe to the MacRumors YouTube channel for more videos.

GeForce Now is a streaming gaming service that lets you play GPU and CPU intensive games on Macs that might not be able to natively handle the hardware requirements for a particular title.

All rendering and computing is handled by NVIDIA’s servers, where the games are installed. Gameplay is then streamed to your computer, so naturally, a robust internet connection is required to make sure there’s no lag.

There’s a free version of the GeForce Now service, which provides standard access and limits gaming sessions to one hour, but for $4.99 per month, gamers can get priority access, support for NVIDIA’s RTX graphics rendering platform, and longer session lengths.

The $4.99 per month cost (or the free service) does NOT include access to games. You still need to purchase games from supported game stores like Steam to be able to play them using GeForce Now, though there are some free ad-supported titles.

Even though GeForce Now has been in beta for three years, the game library is still a little bit lackluster. There are many newer games that are not supported, but games like Fortnite, League of Legends, Witcher 3, and Destiny 2 are available.

NVIDIA recommends a stellar internet connection, but even with 400Mb/s download speeds, we ran into some troubles. On a 12-inch MacBook Pro, which is certainly not powerful enough to play most games, titles would output at 30 frames per second maximum at a resolution of 1200 x 800, which was not a positive gameplay experience. The game was choppy, blurry, and frustrating to play.

Using GeForce Now on an iMac Pro with the same WiFi connection resulted in similar performance issues, but swapping over to an Ethernet cable for a hardwired connection solved all of our issues.

Playing Destiny 2 over GeForce Now with an ‌iMac Pro‌ on the wired connection resulted in no lag, a much higher resolution and frame rate, and no dropped frames. It was a smooth experience that was much like playing the game on a high-end gaming PC.

When trying a wired connection on the 12-inch MacBook, gameplay was also flawless, so NVIDIA is not kidding about the internet requirements. For the best possible experience, connecting over Ethernet is ideal.

GeForce Now is limited to North America and Europe at the current time, and the gaming library is limited, but as new titles are added, this may be a service worth checking out. It’s free to try, so long as you own the game you want to play.

Have you tried GeForce Now? Let us know what you think in the comments.

This article, “Hands-On With NVIDIA’s GeForce Now Streaming Game Service” first appeared on MacRumors.com

Discuss this article in our forums

Back in 2017, NVIDIA announced the launch of its GeForce Now streaming gaming service, which it made available in a beta capacity.

After years of testing, polishing, and refining, the GeForce Now service saw its official launch on February 4, so we thought we'd go hands-on with GeForce Now to see how it works on Apple's Macs.

Subscribe to the MacRumors YouTube channel for more videos.

GeForce Now is a streaming gaming service that lets you play GPU and CPU intensive games on Macs that might not be able to natively handle the hardware requirements for a particular title.

All rendering and computing is handled by NVIDIA's servers, where the games are installed. Gameplay is then streamed to your computer, so naturally, a robust internet connection is required to make sure there's no lag.

There's a free version of the GeForce Now service, which provides standard access and limits gaming sessions to one hour, but for $4.99 per month, gamers can get priority access, support for NVIDIA's RTX graphics rendering platform, and longer session lengths.

The $4.99 per month cost (or the free service) does NOT include access to games. You still need to purchase games from supported game stores like Steam to be able to play them using GeForce Now, though there are some free ad-supported titles.

Even though GeForce Now has been in beta for three years, the game library is still a little bit lackluster. There are many newer games that are not supported, but games like Fortnite, League of Legends, Witcher 3, and Destiny 2 are available.

NVIDIA recommends a stellar internet connection, but even with 400Mb/s download speeds, we ran into some troubles. On a 12-inch MacBook Pro, which is certainly not powerful enough to play most games, titles would output at 30 frames per second maximum at a resolution of 1200 x 800, which was not a positive gameplay experience. The game was choppy, blurry, and frustrating to play.

Using GeForce Now on an iMac Pro with the same WiFi connection resulted in similar performance issues, but swapping over to an Ethernet cable for a hardwired connection solved all of our issues.

Playing Destiny 2 over GeForce Now with an ‌iMac Pro‌ on the wired connection resulted in no lag, a much higher resolution and frame rate, and no dropped frames. It was a smooth experience that was much like playing the game on a high-end gaming PC.

When trying a wired connection on the 12-inch MacBook, gameplay was also flawless, so NVIDIA is not kidding about the internet requirements. For the best possible experience, connecting over Ethernet is ideal.

GeForce Now is limited to North America and Europe at the current time, and the gaming library is limited, but as new titles are added, this may be a service worth checking out. It's free to try, so long as you own the game you want to play.

Have you tried GeForce Now? Let us know what you think in the comments.


This article, "Hands-On With NVIDIA's GeForce Now Streaming Game Service" first appeared on MacRumors.com

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Mac Pro’s $400 Wheels Have No Locks to Prevent Rolling

Since launch, Apple’s Mac Pro has been the butt of jokes because of some of its expensive add-ons, such as the option to purchase wheels for an additional $400.


As pointed out by MKBHD in a review published this morning, those super pricy wheels have no locking mechanism, which could be major problem if a wheel-equipped ‌Mac Pro‌ is placed on a desk or a slick floor.

#protip don’t get the wheels if you keep this thing on your desk. There’s no locks. pic.twitter.com/NfkqQiNKYC

— Marques Brownlee (@MKBHD) February 26, 2020

In a demonstration video, MKBHD shows the ‌Mac Pro‌ rolling freely on a slick floor because of the lack of wheel locks.

Those who want to secure their wheeled ‌Mac Pro‌ models will need to use some kind of stopper to prevent accidents, though no lock won’t be an issue on many surfaces as long as the ‌Mac Pro‌ is on the floor.

.@MKBHD One More Thing… pic.twitter.com/ySZBJp2NCy

— ᴺᴼᵀ Jony Ive (@JonyIveParody) February 26, 2020

Right now, wheels have to be purchased as a $400 add-on when ordering a ‌Mac Pro‌ for the first time, but in a recent technical overview of the Mac Pro, Apple confirmed plans to begin offering feet and wheels as a “customer installable kit” in the future.

Related Roundup: Mac Pro
Buyer’s Guide: Mac Pro (Buy Now)

This article, “Mac Pro’s $400 Wheels Have No Locks to Prevent Rolling” first appeared on MacRumors.com

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Since launch, Apple's Mac Pro has been the butt of jokes because of some of its expensive add-ons, such as the option to purchase wheels for an additional $400.


As pointed out by MKBHD in a review published this morning, those super pricy wheels have no locking mechanism, which could be major problem if a wheel-equipped ‌Mac Pro‌ is placed on a desk or a slick floor.


In a demonstration video, MKBHD shows the ‌Mac Pro‌ rolling freely on a slick floor because of the lack of wheel locks.

Those who want to secure their wheeled ‌Mac Pro‌ models will need to use some kind of stopper to prevent accidents, though no lock won't be an issue on many surfaces as long as the ‌Mac Pro‌ is on the floor.


Right now, wheels have to be purchased as a $400 add-on when ordering a ‌Mac Pro‌ for the first time, but in a recent technical overview of the Mac Pro, Apple confirmed plans to begin offering feet and wheels as a "customer installable kit" in the future.

Related Roundup: Mac Pro
Buyer's Guide: Mac Pro (Buy Now)

This article, "Mac Pro's $400 Wheels Have No Locks to Prevent Rolling" first appeared on MacRumors.com

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Now-Fixed WiFi Vulnerability Left Apple Devices Open to Attack

A vulnerability in WiFi chips made by Cypress Semiconductor and Broadcom left billions of devices susceptible to an attack that allowed nearby attackers to decrypt sensitive data sent over the air.


The security flaw was detailed at the RSA security conference today (via Ars Technica), and for Apple users, the issue was addressed in the iOS 13.2 and macOS 10.15.1 updates that were released back in late October.

Dubbed Kr00k, the WiFi chip flaw caused vulnerable devices to use an all-zero encryption key to encrypt part of a user’s communications. When applied successfully, the attack let hackers decrypt some wireless network packets sent by a vulnerable device. As described by Ars Technica:

Kr00k exploits a weakness that occurs when wireless devices disassociate from a wireless access point. If either the end-user device or the access point is vulnerable, it will put any unsent data frames into a transmit buffer and then send them over the air. Rather than encrypt this data with the session key negotiated earlier and used during the normal connection, vulnerable devices use a key consisting of all zeros, a move that makes decryption trivial.

Chips from Broadcom and Cypress are used in many modern WiFi devices like smartphones, laptops, Internet of Things products, WiFi access points, and routers.

Our tests confirmed that prior to patching, some client devices by Amazon (Echo, Kindle), Apple (iPhone, iPad, MacBook), Google (Nexus), Samsung (Galaxy), Raspberry (Pi 3), Xiaomi (RedMi), as well as some access points by Asus and Huawei, were vulnerable to KrØØk. This totaled to over a billion Wi-Fi-capable devices and access points, at a conservative estimate. Further, many other vendors whose products we did not test also use the affected chipsets in their devices.

According to ESET Research, which published details on the vulnerability, it was disclosed to Broadcom and Cypress along with potentially affected parties. At this time, patches for devices from most major manufacturers have been released.

ESET Research recommends making sure all of the latest updates have been applied to WiFi capable devices to patch the vulnerability.

This article, “Now-Fixed WiFi Vulnerability Left Apple Devices Open to Attack” first appeared on MacRumors.com

Discuss this article in our forums

A vulnerability in WiFi chips made by Cypress Semiconductor and Broadcom left billions of devices susceptible to an attack that allowed nearby attackers to decrypt sensitive data sent over the air.


The security flaw was detailed at the RSA security conference today (via Ars Technica), and for Apple users, the issue was addressed in the iOS 13.2 and macOS 10.15.1 updates that were released back in late October.

Dubbed Kr00k, the WiFi chip flaw caused vulnerable devices to use an all-zero encryption key to encrypt part of a user's communications. When applied successfully, the attack let hackers decrypt some wireless network packets sent by a vulnerable device. As described by Ars Technica:
Kr00k exploits a weakness that occurs when wireless devices disassociate from a wireless access point. If either the end-user device or the access point is vulnerable, it will put any unsent data frames into a transmit buffer and then send them over the air. Rather than encrypt this data with the session key negotiated earlier and used during the normal connection, vulnerable devices use a key consisting of all zeros, a move that makes decryption trivial.
Chips from Broadcom and Cypress are used in many modern WiFi devices like smartphones, laptops, Internet of Things products, WiFi access points, and routers.
Our tests confirmed that prior to patching, some client devices by Amazon (Echo, Kindle), Apple (iPhone, iPad, MacBook), Google (Nexus), Samsung (Galaxy), Raspberry (Pi 3), Xiaomi (RedMi), as well as some access points by Asus and Huawei, were vulnerable to KrØØk. This totaled to over a billion Wi-Fi-capable devices and access points, at a conservative estimate. Further, many other vendors whose products we did not test also use the affected chipsets in their devices.
According to ESET Research, which published details on the vulnerability, it was disclosed to Broadcom and Cypress along with potentially affected parties. At this time, patches for devices from most major manufacturers have been released.

ESET Research recommends making sure all of the latest updates have been applied to WiFi capable devices to patch the vulnerability.


This article, "Now-Fixed WiFi Vulnerability Left Apple Devices Open to Attack" first appeared on MacRumors.com

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Some urBeats3 Customers May Have Been Denied Service Due to Serial Number Error

Some urbeats3 devices may have incorrect serial numbers that could lead to service being denied, according to information provided to Apple Authorized Service Providers.


Apple has informed AASPs that a “limited number” of urbeats3 were released with an incorrect serial number that results in an error when looking them up in the repair database.

A limited number of urBeats3 devices have the incorrect serial number printed on them that results in a ‘Serial Number Unrecognized’ error when looking up a device.

When faced with this issue, check whether the fifth digit of the serial number is an ‘E’. If so, validate proof of purchase and attempt to create the repair by substituting the fifth digit ‘E’ in the serial number with a ‘Y’.

To provide service to urbeats3 devices exhibiting this problem, Apple recommends Apple Authorized Service Providers validate proof of purchase by replacing the “E” located in the fifth spot of the sequence with a “Y.”

Apple introduced urbeats3 in September 2017, and has sold them since then. Priced at $60 and often available on sale for less, urBeats3 are Apple’s most affordable Beats-branded earbuds.

This article, “Some urBeats3 Customers May Have Been Denied Service Due to Serial Number Error” first appeared on MacRumors.com

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Some urbeats3 devices may have incorrect serial numbers that could lead to service being denied, according to information provided to Apple Authorized Service Providers.


Apple has informed AASPs that a "limited number" of urbeats3 were released with an incorrect serial number that results in an error when looking them up in the repair database.
A limited number of urBeats3 devices have the incorrect serial number printed on them that results in a 'Serial Number Unrecognized' error when looking up a device.

When faced with this issue, check whether the fifth digit of the serial number is an 'E'. If so, validate proof of purchase and attempt to create the repair by substituting the fifth digit 'E' in the serial number with a 'Y'.
To provide service to urbeats3 devices exhibiting this problem, Apple recommends Apple Authorized Service Providers validate proof of purchase by replacing the "E" located in the fifth spot of the sequence with a "Y."

Apple introduced urbeats3 in September 2017, and has sold them since then. Priced at $60 and often available on sale for less, urBeats3 are Apple's most affordable Beats-branded earbuds.


This article, "Some urBeats3 Customers May Have Been Denied Service Due to Serial Number Error" first appeared on MacRumors.com

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Apple Developing Over-the-Air Recovery Feature for iOS Based on Code in iOS 13.4

Code in the iOS 13.4 beta released this morning suggests that Apple is developing an over-the-air recovery feature designed for the iPhone and the iPad.


There are references to a hidden “OS Recovery” option in the update found by 9to5Mac, which appears to provide a way to restore an ‌iPhone‌, ‌iPad‌, Apple Watch, or HomePod without the need to connect to a computer.

Right now, if you have a malfunctioning ‌iPhone‌ or ‌iPad‌, a Mac or PC needs to be used to restore the firmware, which is inconvenient as some people no longer even use computers and Apple has made efforts to remove the need to operate iOS devices with computers.

Devices like the ‌Apple Watch‌ and ‌HomePod‌ don’t even have options to restore the software because there are no connectors, a problem that the OS Recovery feature could solve. There is a similar macOS Internet Recovery option that has been available for some time, allowing Macs to be restored with software downloaded over the internet.

It appears the feature will allow for a restore to be conducted over-the-air or by connecting a device to another ‌iPhone‌ or ‌iPad‌ using a USB connection.

Related Roundups: iOS 13, iPadOS

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Code in the iOS 13.4 beta released this morning suggests that Apple is developing an over-the-air recovery feature designed for the iPhone and the iPad.


There are references to a hidden "OS Recovery" option in the update found by 9to5Mac, which appears to provide a way to restore an ‌iPhone‌, ‌iPad‌, Apple Watch, or HomePod without the need to connect to a computer.

Right now, if you have a malfunctioning ‌iPhone‌ or ‌iPad‌, a Mac or PC needs to be used to restore the firmware, which is inconvenient as some people no longer even use computers and Apple has made efforts to remove the need to operate iOS devices with computers.

Devices like the ‌Apple Watch‌ and ‌HomePod‌ don't even have options to restore the software because there are no connectors, a problem that the OS Recovery feature could solve. There is a similar macOS Internet Recovery option that has been available for some time, allowing Macs to be restored with software downloaded over the internet.

It appears the feature will allow for a restore to be conducted over-the-air or by connecting a device to another ‌iPhone‌ or ‌iPad‌ using a USB connection.

Related Roundups: iOS 13, iPadOS

This article, "Apple Developing Over-the-Air Recovery Feature for iOS Based on Code in iOS 13.4" first appeared on MacRumors.com

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